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News Microsoft to launch Visual Studio IDE for Apple's macOS

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by Gareth Halfacree, 15 Nov 2016.

  1. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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  2. Paradigm Shifter

    Paradigm Shifter de nihilo nihil fit

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    Gareth, you've seen me write it before...

    Microsoft...? Office for Linux?

    I mean, if you can port Visual Studio to Mac...! ;)
     
  3. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    Aye, and you've seen my reply: don't reckon it'll ever happen. The vague support for Office 365's browser-based stuff is as close as I reckon we're going to see. Porting PowerShell and MSSQL to Linux was Microsoft admitting that it's lost the battle for the server market; porting Visual Studio to macOS is admitting that it's struggling with developers; porting Office to Linux would be throwing its hands into the air and saying "whelp, Windows is donezo."

    It also wouldn't make much financial sense: Linux has a huge chunk of the server market, so MSSQL for Linux makes sense; macOS has a surprising chunk of the dev market, so Visual Studio for macOS makes sense; Linux is, what, 1-2% of the desktop market? S'not worth it. (Although Android's a different matter - and you *can* get Microsoft Office for Android...)
     
  4. Paradigm Shifter

    Paradigm Shifter de nihilo nihil fit

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    Yep. Agreed.

    ...and yet, hope springs eternal. :thumb:
     
  5. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    If Microsoft did release Office for Linux, I'd probably still use LibreOffice 'cos I'm a massive cheapskate!
     
  6. azrael-

    azrael- I'm special...

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    Dumb question: Visual Studio for Linux? I know there's GCC and the like, but the VS IDE is just so luvverly... :)
     
  7. mi1ez

    mi1ez Active Member

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    I'd get it on the company 365, sure I'm not alone!
     
  8. Paradigm Shifter

    Paradigm Shifter de nihilo nihil fit

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    Excel does things that Calc does not (and the devs say never will). Reference managers can also be a little flaky with LibreOffice, which is a colossal PITA. My favoured one works, but sometimes goes a bit nuts for reasons I can't figure out. :( Never have the same problem in Word.
     
  9. theshadow2001

    theshadow2001 [DELETE] means [DELETE]

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    I wrote my thesis in Libre Office and it genuinely broke me. It is just awful. I had a large amount of diagrams charts and images and the formatting had a mind of its own. I would close the document then reopen and stuff would move around and some images even disappeared entirely. I eventually had to put images in hidden tables as a work around for the formatting issues the disappearing images was never solved. I had to keep the document open until I finished editing and exported the pdf. You can't have different styles on the same paragraph and so adding a heading on the same line as the content starts (as is required by some academic formats) is not possible without a slow manual work around. I also had a page numbering bug when messing with the TOC. The header and footer spacing controls are weird. I could go on and on.

    The worst thing is, it has the most insidious feature a piece of software can have. A veil of adequacy. When you start using it you believe it's good enough for the job only to find that it really isn't once you start stressing it. But the realisation only comes after a point where you have committed so much time to it that switching platforms isn't an option and so you just have to power through with it.

    I've since learned a bit about LaTex and if I were stuck on Linux again I would probably set up a template with it and use that.
     
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  10. Paradigm Shifter

    Paradigm Shifter de nihilo nihil fit

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    I agree completely. Except I actually need to put some time into learning LaTeX, but learning FORTRAN is currently higher on my list so I can fix some old code. :blush
     
  11. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    LaTeX is absolutely the way forward for professional layout, but by 'eck there's a learning curve. For what I do, LibreOffice is Good Enough{param}. I've written several books in it, and am working on a new one now - and any formatting glitches it may cause are the publisher's job to fix!
     
  12. theshadow2001

    theshadow2001 [DELETE] means [DELETE]

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    FORTRAN? Ah yes, the malt liquor:
    [​IMG]
    It's not too bad if you have a pre-written template. Starting from scratch would be difficult though. I like the programmery vibe to it, it's generally more predictable than a WYSIWYG editor and if it's not working it's something you can fix by tweaking and googling. Plus it means I can use Vim as a text editor which is also quite nice once you get your head around it.
     
  13. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    Vim represent! Emacs for the lose! (I've picked my side in the editor wars and am very happy with my choice - and it may go some way to explain why I loathe macOS so much, it being the Emacs of operating systems and all.)
     
  14. theshadow2001

    theshadow2001 [DELETE] means [DELETE]

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    I chose it over Emacs because vi comes installed with most linux distros. So it made sense to learn. I don't have the patience to learn another one.
     
  15. mi1ez

    mi1ez Active Member

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    Really ought to learn Vim some time.
    Rarely hit a CLI text editor except to make commits, and nano's just fine for that.
     
  16. Paradigm Shifter

    Paradigm Shifter de nihilo nihil fit

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    I use Vi as much as I can, but I still screw up occasionally. Sigh. Usually when I'm trying to do something really simple, and muscle memory gets ahead of me. :lol:

    I actually quite like FORTRAN, and it's a ton quicker than C for what the program is doing.

    It's fairly easy; just remember 'escape' is your friend, and colon-w-q. ;)
     

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