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Motors Motorcycle Mayhem

Discussion in 'General' started by RTT, 24 Feb 2009.

  1. Trance

    Trance Two steps forward, one step back

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    Rode a year on a 50cc, took my test and bought a 600cc Diversion, never crashed, had some near misses but thats generally due to people pulling out in front of me and what not. The fact is it was restricted to 33 bhp for 2 years, meaning it could just about pull 90 after a long run up, and the acceleration was mediocre at best. Now if you go out and buy say a 250 ninja which has 33 bhp as standard its going to be lighter, faster with smaller brakes, worse suspension and skinnier tyres. So not really seeing where you are coming from. Also you get a free upgrade after 2 years :) What kills newbie riders is when they think they they are Rossi or something, and living in central Bristol I've seen some outright suicidal 125cc riders.
    Best post test bike imo:
    Suzuki Bandit, Yamaha Diversion, Honda Hornet, Yamaha Fazer, Kawasaki Er6 (thats all I can think of atm...)
     
  2. boiled_elephant

    boiled_elephant Merom Celeron 4 lyfe

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    I think the point at which I diverge from most bikers is when they start talking about 90-100mph+ speeds as if they're normal and okay. I come down on the side of the police when it comes to stuff like that, even if it makes me Mr Buzzkill. This is why I'm blown away by the drop in demand for 250s and 400s - they can do 80-110mph. A 400 will happily cruise along in the fast lane of a motorway without stressing itself. Why get something that can do 70mph more on top of that?

    I appreciate that they accelerate more quickly and can get you out of tight situations, as well as making overtaking easier and safer. But that extra power also means that wheelspins and lowsides are more likely, especially in the less-than-ideal conditions we often face in the UK. And yes, they have fatter tires, but only to compensate for their larger mass; they aren't "safer" in the same corner at the same speed than a light bike with skinnier tires. I've had my CG leant over as far as the centre stand will allow without any traction problems; it's a fallacy to think that a huge back tire is going to make you safer, when in reality it'll just encourage you to corner more aggressively more of the time, increasing the chances of an accident.

    And have we mentioned fuel economy yet? I get that for some people, a motorbike is a large toy, and I respect that (because sports bikes are awesome toys). But if it's anything more than that - a primary form of transport, say - the mpg of large sports bikes is just a joke.

    Really, that's what it all comes down to. If your motorbike is just a weekend toy, then a huge, expensive, powerful fuel-guzzling machine makes sense. If you want to actually use a bike to get places, it's a dangerous, expensive and illogical choice.
     
  3. RTT

    RTT #parp

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    Absolutely no offence taken dude, you're entitled to your opinion, as we all are! My first bike was a 950cc fire breathing mad-machine, so you can see why I might say that big bikes aren't necessarily a bad idea; it's all down to the pilot :thumb: A mate of mine right now is learning and was considering a 1050 speed as a first bike - i'll admit I told him that was probably a bad idea, but I'd have no words of discouragement if he wanted, for example, an MT-07 as a first bike

    /voice of devils advocate

    My dad used to tour Europe and commute 100 miles a day on a K5 GSXR1000 *shrug* :D

    I agree, largely. Anywhere from 70-100HP is ideal in my mind as a first bike if you're getting a 'proper' bike - think Hornets, SV650s, even street triples and the like. Enough power to deal with any road you can imagine (and room to grow skills wise), but not enough to accidentally do 130mph in 3rd gear while overtaking things
     
    Last edited: 19 May 2014
  4. Fat Tony

    Fat Tony Minimodder

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    with one wheel in the air don't forget





    [but this is fun]
     
  5. julianmartin

    julianmartin resident cyborg.

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    Right, I'm getting to the position of being able to buy a bike again....I don't have bundles to spare.

    I'm thinking about £1-2k to start with, for a fun beater to do me for this summer, with the idea that I'll be saving for (maybe) a Diavel for next year.

    One caveat - I want inline. Tried the V thing, didn't enjoy it that much.

    Ideas?

    I've gone from ZXR400s to CBR600 FS, and everything in between. Cannot make my mind up. Something different would be cool...bearing in mind I have a fairly pokey car, whatever I buy will have to be pretty pokey indeed to satiate me. I don't think I really need a 1000 yet though.
     
  6. Rhydian

    Rhydian What's a Dremel?

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    You'll never be satisfied, you sound a lot like me! We could suggest bikes all day, and I guarantee you'll still go for the first bike that makes you tingle when you see it :p
     
  7. boiled_elephant

    boiled_elephant Merom Celeron 4 lyfe

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    I'm not very down with the big bikes (you might've noticed), but by universal consensus - every review, every customer description - the Diavel is the kind of bike that, once you've got it, you won't want anything else in your garage. It looks, and by all accounts is, legendary.

    My immediate thought is: there'll always be more summers. If you're going to have one of these sooner or later,

    [​IMG]

    why make it a month or even a day later than it financially must be?

    I mean, sure, it's summer now, but it'd be like postponing your wedding because a girl just offered to give you head in a club toilet.
     
  8. julianmartin

    julianmartin resident cyborg.

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    A fair point!

    I failed to point out though I intend to save for a Diavel in addition to this.

    Something about a supermoto has always attracted me. I've never ridden one though, and I'm pretty short...any owners here?
     
  9. RTT

    RTT #parp

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    I can't honestly think of any supermotos which have inline engines, unless you count a single as 'inline' somehow :D
     
  10. RTT

    RTT #parp

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    Spot the S1000RR owner :D
     
  11. Umbra

    Umbra What's a Dremel?

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    Build one, maybe not quite a supermoto but sure looks like fun, I learnt to ride on the dirt and rode MX and trials but never had R1 power :rock:
     
  12. TheDodoKiller

    TheDodoKiller Minimodder

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    So... I've been knocked off again.

    Heading round the North Circ to Kilburn, Got off the circ and went through neasden, because there was way too much traffic, to get the bike MOT'd at Southern Cross, and I'm filtering, roughly 15mph. There's a bus at a bus stop on the right side of the road, so I figured it's ok to filter with no-oncoming traffic; As I got to the gap with the bus and my lane, someone drove at me head on from a side road. I grabbed my front brake, endo'd the bike, landed on their bonnet with the bike pinning my legs down.

    The driver gave the excuse that the person in stationary traffic flashed them that it was ok to come out.

    Apparently there was damage to their car, caused by me, and potentially their bike. Police attended, Ambulance took me off, had some pretty bad pain in my knees. Hospital said my knee's were fine though.

    Ended up paying £20 for a cab ride back to the bike, then rode it 20 miles home. The rear panel is seriously messed up, cracked and everything else. clutch perch seems to be broken too.

    Not sure what's next, who's fault it is, and if I'll be able to afford a bike any time in the near future (If I have a claim against me)

    The woman said she was sorry, etc, it was a freak accident, all that. Surely saying sorry all the time is an admission of guilt?

    Does anyone know what I should be doing right now? Never had an accident involving another vehicle.
     
    Last edited: 23 May 2014
  13. boiled_elephant

    boiled_elephant Merom Celeron 4 lyfe

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    My one and only crash, we settled outside the insurance companies (me paying out for the repairs) because neither of us had protected NCB and neither of us wanted our premiums to go up. But in my case I was clearly in the wrong, whereas in yours it sounds like nobody's fault in particular but technically more hers (because you had right of way and she should have been looking).

    I'd treat insurance as a last resort either way, though, they're swines and between legal costs and increased premiums for years to come, it will probably cost a fortune no matter who wins. It might be worth talking to her about it and seeing what kind of agreement she might be willing to come to. She might agree to call it quits, which frankly would be a net gain and the best solution: since there's damage to both vehicles and it'll be a nightmare to prove either way in court, it might work out cheaper than any alternative.

    (edit - nitty gritty stuff: you need all her details - address, name, vehicle license, number of your insurance broker - and she needs all of yours, and the sooner you communicate and establish a course of action the better.)
     
  14. Fat Tony

    Fat Tony Minimodder

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    I'm not an expert - so this is just opinion - but ...

    Filtering is not illegal, being flashed out is no excuse, sounds like the person who came out on you made a dangerous manoeuvre.

    I'd be claiming on my insurance, stating that the other party was at fault.

    What did the police have to say about all this?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  15. TheDodoKiller

    TheDodoKiller Minimodder

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    Thanks for the advice, but I believe she has already contacted her insurance company; I've also spent a little time researching, and the consensus seems to be that as long as I was riding legally, ie not speeding, not filtering on a solid white line, then she's 100% in the wrong, since the side road has give way lines, and she obviously didn't give way.

    The police said to me when asked 'who do you think is at fault' replied with 'Well, obviously, you filter at your own risk, so you've got to take that into consideration. The insurance companies will decide whether you or her are at fault'

    Just about to call my insurance company now, so I'll be speaking, i'm sure in depth, with them about it.
     
  16. MrJay

    MrJay You are always where you want to be

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    Aye.

    If she'd have checked before she pulled out she'd have seen you. Imagine if it had been an emergency vehicle, a wide load, someone crossing?

    People are on autopilot unfortunately.

    I've just hit 10k miles and haven't been knocked off...yet. It's only a matter of time though, had some really hairy moments.
     
  17. RTT

    RTT #parp

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    I'm sort of thinking this biking lark isn't really for you:sigh:
     
  18. julianmartin

    julianmartin resident cyborg.

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    You've got a point :)

    I meant inline if I went for a sports bike.
     
  19. Lovah

    Lovah Apple and Canon fanboy

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    sold

    Sold my beloved supermoto last month. I always had a blast driving it around, but those drives were further and further apart. I'm fortunate enough to have a company car (Audi A4) so I always drive that to work and when me and the gf go somewhere on weekens we take the car.

    The only times I drove the bike was when she needed the car to go somewhere or just to bash about a bit. That happend only once a month, if that... so that meant my insurance and taxes divided by 10... adds up to expensive little rides.

    It was hard to see it go... but it's just didn't make sense anymore.
     
  20. Umbra

    Umbra What's a Dremel?

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    Maybe, biking is not for everyone, I've survived 37 years on the road without an accident involving anyone else and that is not all down to luck, it's about reducing the risks as much as you can, for instance, filtering may not be illegal but obviously it's risky as unfortunately you discovered, you didn't save any time by filtering, quite the opposite, it's too risky, don't do it just because you can and it's not illegal, you are uneccessarily placing yourself in a very dangerous situation, was it worth it?

    Biking is about learning and using survival skills,
    It's about planning your ride, what can we see, what we cannot see and what we can reasonably expect to happen and that the outcome we're looking for is to be in the right place at the right speed and to be there at the right moment, that's the Motorcycle Road craft that some of the best riders on the road use...the police riders.

    To me, riding on the road is a war and I need a strategy to survive, your in a war-zone surrounded by a majority of people who have virtually no driving skills beyond starting and stopping a vehicle, many road users are completely useless, but which ones, we can't know so we have to treat them all as totally incompetent, blind and utterly lethal, never trust anyone and that includes other bikers, you can wave me out or flash your lights but I'll do what I want to do, when I want to do it, not when you tell me and if you don't like that, I don't give a ****
    it's my life, I decide, if I get it wrong, it's my fault.

    Survival riding is partly about never assuming anything, "Vision is the art of seeing what is invisible to others." (Jonathan Swift) We see what we expect to see, one of the quickest ways to improve our chances of survival is to improve our perception of the road ahead so we can see the "invisible", hazard road signs are there for a reason, probably because others have got it wrong and crashed and burned, don't ignore them and assume you know better, act on the info they give you, if you ignore that info and crash, it's your fault, why did you ignore it?

    Yesterday, today and tomorrow, Don't assume the road won't change from day to day, just because your favourite bend was clear yesterday or even ten minutes ago, don't assume it will be the next time you lean into it, imagine going into a blind bend and suddenly being confronted with a bike and rider lying in the road, could you stop and not ride over them? Hold that thought for the next blind bend.
    Every time I go into a blind bend I expect it to get worse, that way I'm prepared for the worst, if the road is clear I live another day, that's survival, most accidents can be avoided.

    If your riding feels like you are lurching from one near miss to another than it might be time to evaluate your riding or get some survival training, we know there are a lot of appalling drivers on the road so we have to take responsibility to avoid them and not expect everyone to see and avoid us, that's a very dangerous attitude to rely on and if that all sounds too much like hard work then maybe biking is not for you, if you decide to stop riding then that could be the biggest survival decision you ever make.
     

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