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Motors Motorcycle Mayhem

Discussion in 'General' started by RTT, 24 Feb 2009.

  1. Ending Credits

    Ending Credits Bunned

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    Exams over, time to look at doing my CBT!

    Does anyone have any recommendations for places in the North East? (Preferably near Durham)

    EDIT: http://www.2wheelsmotorcycletraining.co.uk/ is cheapest, should I be worried about prices that low?

    EDIT2: I may need some gloves and boots as well (I'm presuming I can hire a helmet and that conventional legwear will be okay for a CBT). What are people's opinions on Scott Leathers?
     
    Last edited: 5 Jun 2014
  2. Rhydian

    Rhydian What's a Dremel?

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    It is a CBT, however! Coming off on a 125 at 30 hurts the same as coming off a 1000. You should try and bring your own gear, most places have helmets, jackets, and gloves. These will all meet the required standard for motorcycling at legal speeds.

    The minimum I would recommend is a good thick pair of jeans, perhaps wear leg warmers underneath because windchill factor is real pain. Choose good high top boots, not trainers! This is not only for protection but the thicker lining makes it easier to put a bit more pressure on the gear lever, this will most certainly give you an edge changing gears form 1-2.

    Gloves in my opinion are absolutely essential and a good pair are affordable. Your CBT training school should provide a pair if not slap them when you pass.

    Last note, check into a motorcycle dealer. Several in my area actually have deals on CBT gear sets, these are often a basic high vis jacket, hi-vis helmet, pants, gloves etc that is perfect for new starters in any weather.
     
  3. Ending Credits

    Ending Credits Bunned

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    I'll probably just go and get a full set of gear then. Sounds like the easiest option.
     
  4. boiled_elephant

    boiled_elephant Merom Celeron 4 lyfe

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    Typically, they will give you a highly patronizing lecture about gear, during which they'll gleefully point out any omissions in your gear setup (as though you're a moto GP rider who got unconscionably carefree, or something) and describe in detail what the lack of that particular piece of gear could do.

    This probably varies from instructor to instructor, though. The guy I had for my CBTs has something of a reputation in the area for being a condescending ass.

    In other news, does this piss anybody else off?

    CBF 600 (2008-current) - MCN

    'Gut feeling' reviews. MCN are really bad for this with middle-of-the-range bikes: they list everything that's great about a great bike, then go "BUT IT'S BORING, YOU WON'T HAVE FUN" and give it three stars. Such unprofessional bollocks.

    Best of all is this glowing paragraph:

    Oh, but by the way, it's a bit "on the dull side", so I guess never recommend it to anybody ever.

    :wallbash:
     
  5. Fat Tony

    Fat Tony Minimodder

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    Can you not borrow some from a friend?

    You'll end up getting some gear which is adequate for the CBT - and then, if you take it further to bike test and pass, you'll inevitably have learnt more about what gear you really need and want, and I'm willing to bet it won't be the stuff you bought for the CBT.

    If you're a small Arai fit, have size 42 feet, small hands and are 5ft10 and on the 'xlarge' side - and can make it to South Manchester (and back again please) - I have some stuff you could borrow.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  6. Ending Credits

    Ending Credits Bunned

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    I don't know anyone who bikes, certainly not in the surrounding area.

    Unfortunately, I don't think any of the stuff you listed there would fit me, but thanks for the offer!

    I'll probably give one of the schools a ring and speak to them about it.

    EDIT: They said they hire everything except trousers and boots.
     
    Last edited: 6 Jun 2014
  7. RTT

    RTT #parp

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    MCN is mostly a load of bollocks, yes, undoubtedly, but all they're saying is that it isn't going to be the most rewarding thing in the world if you're into spirited riding on a Sunday afternoon :confused:
     
  8. Umbra

    Umbra What's a Dremel?

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    I bought MCN for around 20 years until I read a review on a superbike (can't remember which one now) and MCN said something like, If you bought one new and spent a couple of grand on it and put some better brakes, decent tyres, exhaust, rear shock, have the forks re-valved and the ECU remapped, then it would be quite a decent bike, WTF, this is a road bike that very few riders, if any, will be able to ride to it's limits and let's not forget the public roads are not a racetrack, what a bunch of idiots.

    I've never bought MCN since but when I scanned through a copy that a friend had a while ago I saw that the attitude was much the same and they seem incapable of reviewing a sports bike without the obligatory wheelie pictures, also for a bike paper that thinks bigger and faster is better, MCN have not always been that enthusiastic towards riders rights organisations like MAG who have fought against BHP limits and machine type approval for many years and obviously if these laws where to be introduced, high BHP sports bikes and the fitting of aftermarket parts (not just tuning parts) would be illegal or if allowed parts would be very expensive, think Germany which has some of the most ferocious type approval laws around where even the smallest accessories and modifications must be approved, which makes them expensive, or they are illegal.

    If BHP and machine type approval laws are ever introduced MCN and some other mags with the same attitude will not have helped the cause but be partly to blame for it, biking is a minority sub culture which many people dislike intently and we know how the press react when some **** is filmed doing 180mph on a public road, a few press campaigns near voting time calling for "These hooligans bikers to be stopped!"with some choice videos and pictures of burnouts and wheelies on public roads and the political parties could be swayed to pass such laws, well done MCN, keep up the good work.
     
    Last edited: 6 Jun 2014
  9. EvilMerc

    EvilMerc Minimodder

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    ...and this is precisely why I read Ride magazine. Their reviews focus on things like how usable a bike is.

    One thing I've not yet got my head around though is all the reviews I've read on the KTM 690 Duke. I was lucky enough to ride one a few weeks ago and it's quite the machine, except for one absolutely crippling flaw. Never before have I had vibration become absolutely unbearable in the mid-range, yet I've not read a single review slating this. Sure the handling is brilliant, the engine punchy and the ergos supremely comfortable, but the vibrations make the damn thing unrideable without every single body part in contact with the bike going completely numb!

    It really hit home the value of test rides to me, and how much I love having an inline four.
     
    boiled_elephant likes this.
  10. RTT

    RTT #parp

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    Crikey, nothing beats a good old rant eh? :D I largely agree. Journos (especially in a testosterone fuelled niche) generally lose the bigger picture.

    I wanted a 690 originally but was put off by the same issue. Very vibey - however it does come with the territory, unfortunately. The 690s were/are very difficult to get running right (in general) with dealers struggling to understand them themselves, especially in the electronics department. In the end I went with a 950 which was a much smoother, much more sorted (and much more fun) bike
     
  11. The RAM

    The RAM Minimodder

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    So here's a question. Is there a universally accepted biker signal that police are around? I've seen flashing, slow down wave and tapping the helmet but I've never quite known which. I ask because I discovered yesterday (in a petrol station, not the road thankfully!) that West Sussex Police have an S1000RR in their fleet! Wouldn't be any escaping that! If you're in the area and see a black and yellow RR, be suspicious. It's probably plod!

    I tapped my lid at one guy flying towards me just after I left the petrol station and saw him slow white quickly in my mirror. Thoughts?
     
  12. julianmartin

    julianmartin resident cyborg.

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    I've never seen a standard one....tapping helmet would make me think though.

    Bear in mind, you can get in trouble for doing this, I'm sure I've heard about car drivers going to court for flashing.
     
  13. Rhydian

    Rhydian What's a Dremel?

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    In my opinion tapping on the helmet is a very well known sign. However this is not me condoning speeding or participating in any actions that may well be illegal.

    Also Police are awesome and I'm glad they now have an s1000rr in their fleet...this has nothing at all to do with my pending application with the police service.
     
  14. RTT

    RTT #parp

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    Tapping on your helmet or just flashing is what i've seen/done
     
  15. Ending Credits

    Ending Credits Bunned

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    So, just finished my CBT! :clap:

    Still don't feel too comfortable with the slower maneuvers though. Did it on a 50cc scooter (their 125 was being repaired) and I really didn't feel like I had any control from just using the back brake alone. Probably just need practice. (Managed to end up on the wrong side of the road while turning out a junction, which is obviously not ideal.)

    Wasn't a huge fan of the instructor either. Nice guy and he knew what he was talking about, but I didn't really feel like I was always getting a clear set of instructions and he was quite harsh in a benign sort of way. Nothing wrong with that, but it could be quite stressful at times, particularly for me since I tend to struggle driving under pressure.

    Will probably go back and do a geared introduction course there. But trying to work out if I want to go straight for the full license or if I want to try a 125 for a while.
     
  16. The RAM

    The RAM Minimodder

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    Yeah. I saw the case about the car driver in question. It was very interesting how it played out, especially given that sat-navs can warn you where they are but if you warn another motorist then it's not legit. If the law says it's wrong, then I'll go with that, but I was also sympathetic to the guys point of view that he was trying to prevent an accident. Sure, he could have just pulled that out as an excuse - I don't know his motives, but the incident below on Saturday also shapes my view. I don't think it's particularly concrete either way. Hmm... :sigh:

    Yeah. I'd never condone anything stupid, but when I see a guy bombing towards me at well over 100 I want to do something so he doesn't kill me or someone else in the future, let alone if there's the police about. I don't mind the police at all, they do what's necessary. I was just amazed to see they had an RR! Was pretty cool. Still, they scare the crap out of me when I talk to them, despite having never done anything wrong!! Talk about fear of punishment, eh?!

    Also, in reference to my above spiel, how would they prove your motive in a 'flashing-to-warn/tapping-helmet' case? Surely it's word against word. Would they be able to prove that's what I was doing beyond reasonable doubt? Could I not be telling a fellow biker to just 'think and slow down a bit'?

    Just musings really. Oh, and congratulations Ending Credits. Welcome to the journey that never ends! :D
     
  17. EvilMerc

    EvilMerc Minimodder

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    A twist and go won't respond to your inputs like a geared bike will, I've no doubt you'll feel more at home with the back brake on one of those providing you have no issues with the gears.

    If you already drive I'd recommend a restricted license, or at least restricting yourself after DAS. Big bikes are more responsibility, but they also have far superior road holding ability. If you reckon your mindset is up to the temptation of going really fast really easily then a 600cc with around 60-100bhp is not unreasonable.

    If you don't drive then it becomes a more tricky question. You won't have the benefit of the training for your full test on your CBT, but doing training whilst riding around on a CBT is a bit pointless as you may as well take your full bike test.

    At the end of the day it's all down to what you feel comfortable with, pushing yourself beyond your limits with motorbikes tends to only end one way.
     
  18. boiled_elephant

    boiled_elephant Merom Celeron 4 lyfe

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    Well, personally I went for DAS (which I passed the Mod 2 of yesterday, by a strange coincidence - go bit-techers!) on the logic that once you've got it, you've got it for life. Besides the extra cost of vehicle hire for the lessons and tests, it's not a very different experience, since they usually put you on something docile like a CB500 (I think these are DAS?) or an ER-6n. I was on the latter and found it a doddle after riding a 125 for several years.

    Ending Credits, I'd stick on the CBT for a little while to get used to the various situations and weather conditions you can encounter on the road, get a feel for what the whole lifestyle involves. There's no need to rush on - but as I said, once you do, you may as well DAS. Saves you paying for two tests in the long run - life is long if you ride properly, and who knows what you'll want to be riding/be able to afford in 20 years' time?

    Also, I told my insurance company about me passing my license and they automatically added £9 to my pemium - same bike, still a CG125, still 6 years' no claims. I just...have no ****ing idea.

    Also, tapping the helmet is what I always see, and what I always do. Even though it tacitly approves speeding (by telling bikers when not to do it), in pragmatic terms it makes total sense. You save somebody getting points on their license. As Top Gear and others have previously observed, speed cops tend to bunker down on roads that have a lot of speeding, not necessarily roads that are particularly dangerous, because they want to catch as many people as possible, justifying their job and earning a fair bit of money for the councils in speeding fines. They're a revenue stream and a show of principle more than a real force pushing for safe roads, which is exemplified by the fact that most speeding fines you hear about are for very marginal infractions - 80mph on motorways, 70mph on 60mph roads (for some of which this is a perfectly safe speed), etc.
     
  19. Rhydian

    Rhydian What's a Dremel?

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    Was with MCE after just passing my full licence. Told me the huge price increase (several hundred ££s) was because I hadn't held my licence for more then 6 months.

    Turns out the guy I registered my insurance with didn't actually register I had a licence at all, and that wasn't the worse of the mistakes they made. When I found out and tried to cancel they upped my premiums to over £250 a month and then to add insult to injury the finance company tried making me pay the rest of the year or face debt collection immediately.

    There really should be no increase unless you change your address.

    Top tip: financial ombudsman do help always give them a call if you feel something is not right.
     
  20. julianmartin

    julianmartin resident cyborg.

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    Okay I'm properly in the market now for a bike, looking to buy next week. After a 600 sports bike, 2-3k. Anyone know of anything?
     

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