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Motors Motorcycle Mayhem

Discussion in 'General' started by RTT, 24 Feb 2009.

  1. Krikkit

    Krikkit All glory to the hypnotoad! Super Moderator

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    I think this has been covered in this topic before, but a sports bike is not necessarily a good idea for a learner - they're not just ridiculously fast, but pretty twitchy and sensitive too.

    [edit] This is the new version of something I'm sure has been posted before. Sage advice, in my opinion. You wouldn't buy a mid-engined supercar to drive straight after you got your car licence, would you?
     
    SeT likes this.
  2. Fule

    Fule The letter D

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    Agree with just about every word in that article. I can sometimes forgive the exuberace of youth when seeing these questions on bike forums, but what pisses me off the most are dealers who know better but prefer another sale. Scaring off / killing your customer base is morally reprehensible and not a particularly great business model.

    Get a real learner's bike and learn. R6 = :nono:
     
  3. Moriquendi

    Moriquendi Bit Tech Biker

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    Good link there Krikkit.

    Not much I can add to that really, don't buy a sports bike (R6) or a supersports bike (R1) as your first bike, you will crash it and if you're lucky you will be alive to cry about it. Buy something in the 400-700 capacity band, second hand, without a fairing. Your wallet will cry less when you drop it (and you WILL drop it) and the less twitchy handling will help you when you barrel into a corner too fast (and you will).

    My advice, go and do your CBT, that way you will get some idea of what you're dealing with and talk to the instructors about what kind of bike to get.

    Moriquendi
     
  4. SeT

    SeT What's a Dremel?

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    heh, thanks for the advice, funny that link directly mentions the R6. I've been reading a lot lately and I'm scheduled for the basic classes in October. The R6 I had pretty much already decided against, not sure why I even mentioned it but for the lol. The guy that suggests it got lucky and his wife has money... An R6 is his first but he's also dropped that bike plenty of times.

    Anyway, getting excited and hoping for a smooth transition/learning curve. Hoping it helps that I've only ever driven manual trans cars so I've got a feel for shifting and I've spent a good portion of my life on 2 wheels on bmx and mountain bikes, though it has been several years since I've ridden either so hoping the breaking difference don't screw me up too much.
     
  5. Krikkit

    Krikkit All glory to the hypnotoad! Super Moderator

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    Well good luck, whatever you pick, I just thought that link might bring into perspective something which I feel very passionately about, not just on two wheels either. I'm deeply annoyed every time I see a nice hot hatch written off because some 18y/o with plenty of money oversteps his ability and crashes.
     
  6. Tec_

    Tec_ What's a Dremel?

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    my friend with a heart condition had this bike and dumped it on its side 2 years ago and the resulting road rash prevented him from having one of his operations. this caused him to loose interest in riding

    Condition when i bought it:
    all scraped up, no power, and two year old gas

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    i rented a trailer and called up my uncle (the mechanic with a SUV) we shoved it on the trailer and dragged it back to my uncles place he has 3 motorcycles and has been working on cars, motorcycles, and trains for ever

    His place and situation
    there are 3 bikes buried in there a Honda, a Yamaha, and a suzuki

    [​IMG]

    Motor from his Honda

    [​IMG]

    the work:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    we dumped a ton of carb cleaner in to it. threw a new bat in it. replaced the spark plugs that needed it. oil change. Fuel filter. uhhh some other thinks im missing cause its late and i cant think of them.


    But i got it HOME!!

    [​IMG]

    it still is running quite rough but the seafoam is doing its work.
     
  7. Xir

    Xir Modder

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    Hmmm, i have the Pilot Road 2 on my big bike (Aprilia RST1000).
    Bike handles a lot lighter than with Metzler Z4 or Z5, wear is slower. Bike is getting twitchy now, I like it, but some people think the Pilot Road 2 make their bike oversensitive.
    On my smaller bike (Ducati 750SS) I have Bridgstone BT21's...the front tyre is actually wearing faster twice as fast as the rear one. I hope that's fixed with the BT23 replacement.

    Grip and feel is fantastic on both tyre types, wet grip is much improved on both bikes.
     
  8. aradreth

    aradreth What's a Dremel?

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    Why is it that every time you find a bike you'd be interested in looking at they are bloody miles away? :wallbash: [/rant]

    @Silver
    Nice choice, I've put several thousand miles on an er6-n and it's great fun so I doubt you'll be disappointed.

    edit:
    I'd add that for your first bike get some good crash bungs for when you do drop it.
     
    Last edited: 11 Aug 2010
  9. Ternix

    Ternix What's a Dremel?

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    Just thought I'd put my words in, been said a thousand times and learners have been warned by several people of the danagers of a sports bikes. I have been riding for less than a year and got my license over 2 years ago. I bought a 1996 Bandit 600 which is still running and a fantastic bike to learn the mechanics which you will want to know so you can service your own bike.

    Heres my Advice to young learners.
    Many of you are looking for massive sports bike (600cc+) but for those of you with restricted licenses are just buying alot of engine which can't be used. In some engines this long term can be damaging to the engine (dependant on restriction method). Simple maths showing the comparison of power to weight ratio.

    Power Weight Ratio
    Motor Bike
    388 hp/tonne = 2006 Bandit 650cc
    819 hp/tonne = 2006 R6

    Car
    82 hp/tonne = Peugeot 206 1.4 16v
    446 hp/tonne = Bugatti Veyron 16.4

    Now of course the above is subject to conditions but what you have to understand is potential power to weight of an R6 been very popular is more powerful than Veyron. Many don't realise this weight ratio and just think about comparing BHP to cars. I know everyone is going to argue on the above specs but the simple fact is bikes are extremely light with revy powerful engines.

    Price
    Lets say you are going to spend 7k on new bike now no matter what you think you WILL drop the bike at least once. With this in mind do you think you like to show off a bike with damage since you can't afford the replacement of fairing been in the hundreds. You are better off buying a bike for under 1k, that way when you drop it your not left out of pocket to fix or replace it.

    Don't Care
    You're one that doesn't care or has parents that own several cars and you just want to show off. Although I've been riding for less than a year on a big bike I've been using it every day to work clocking 120km's each day. There is nothing more funny that seeing some idiot who thinks they look cool then come to a corner and drive slower than the micra infront. The simple fact is buying a big bike although it may look and sound cool when you drop it other bikers will help you out but call you an idiot for riding big so soon. Lets say you pass you car drivers license at 18, are you going to go out and buy a top of the range BMW or EVO?

    Advice for "Adult" Riders
    I'm probably younger than you (21) so I can't give sound advice like 20y experienced riders can but I can assume you have gained enough common sense that the above advice I don't have to say again. I've been riding a 96' Bandit 600, its a great bike and I think very fun as a first big bike. If you want smaller look around 450 mark as this is still very powerful but good to get those skills needed that aren't taught. Remember just because a scooter will look small doesn't mean you can't learn ALOT from them and I would say they can be more fun sometimes, throw them around like a little toy.

    I don't need to advice you on pricing but I can tell you buying a pre 2000 bike means cheaper insurance and value. After a year or two and more confidant upgrade to a newer bike but keep the size the same. From there then take your own path, many have said a new 600 is more power than they will ever need.

    Like to end this by saying ride safe and although the biking community is only some 3% of all road users we are very close community willing to help out any fellow rider. Also go easy on the gas and remember a helmet is only as good as it fits, also don't go out without protection, if your hot then buy summer gear.

    Ride Safe.
    Ternix
     
  10. [ZiiP] NaloaC

    [ZiiP] NaloaC Multimodder

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    I've actually been offered a 1996 Bandit 6 for €550. Actually kind of tempted :D

    Problem being that I still have my car to pay off at the moment and just received my final scholarship payment from my PhD. Crud.
     
  11. Ternix

    Ternix What's a Dremel?

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    If you can get it but check the engine runs smooth and is able to start without difficulty. My bike has developed a fuel problem in which the delivery is not working correctly as such the engine jerks which is annoying. Another problem I know of is the speedo cable can go and although cheap its an annoyance. If you can take it for a test ride and make sure you fill out legal sign document stating during the ride you are responsible. Also have the guy follow you so you don't get losed :D

    If you tick all them I would highly recommend this bike. Great bike and goes on forever if well maintained. Just this week mine passed 70k mark with no big problems.:clap:
     
  12. [ZiiP] NaloaC

    [ZiiP] NaloaC Multimodder

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    It's from a friend on my girlfriend. The guys wife has stated that it has to go and he has no time to ride it any more.

    My problem being that I don't have a licence yet.... or any experience at all :D

    Still a tempting offer. I had been looking at a Yamaha XJ6 naked.
     
  13. Ternix

    Ternix What's a Dremel?

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    Learning for a license can be costly especially if the new motorbike test is in action in Ireland too. Reason for this is the test has become so hard to pass and special new test grounds have had to be built for it.

    I think I spent between 600 or 700 which includes the test before the changes to the test were made.

    If it runs well it maybe a good investment but it could also take months to pass as in south UK waiting list for practical test can be as long as 8 to 12 weeks, then add CBT, theory and lessons.
     
  14. Ljs

    Ljs Modder

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    Damn, DAS courses are expensive or I would consider taking one.

    Glad I got my drivers license before Feb 2001 though :D
     
  15. aradreth

    aradreth What's a Dremel?

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    Part 1 of the test isn't that hard and if you are struggling with it then riding on the road without an instructor on a large bike is dangerous (it basically covers two things you can't ride safely without, especially on big bikes, slow control and emergency manoeuvres).


    The practical test wait is actually shorter than that you just need to go through a training school as they book them in advance and then fill them (there was a 10 week wait on the DSA site when I booked mine but the through the school I had to wait less then a month).
     
    Last edited by a moderator: 20 Aug 2010
  16. [ZiiP] NaloaC

    [ZiiP] NaloaC Multimodder

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    I am not too sure what the situation is here in Ireland with the licences, other than the usual rubbish theory test and then a waiting period. Certainly some lessons would be an idea, but I doubt I will bite at the offer and leave it slip through my fingers.

    These country roads around here are lethal enough. I like the shell of protection that I get in my car.
     
  17. Xir

    Xir Modder

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    The old series or the new ones?

    The old ones are a very forgiving breed, yet comfortable and long distance capable.
    The fairinged diversion looks a lot more mature than it's former pricerange (GS500 and CB500s)
    A good starter, I'd say!
     
  18. [ZiiP] NaloaC

    [ZiiP] NaloaC Multimodder

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    The new model (2009 /2010). Never gave a damn about bikes until I saw a picture of the new model last year. Stunning.

    Shame it's so pricey.

    The way things are going at the moment, I'll be lucky if I get to hold onto my car :(
     
  19. BentAnat

    BentAnat Software Dev

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    I am glad that I am in this country, with regards to licenses.
    It's relatively easy here:
    1) Pass a theory test, and you get a Learner's Livcense. This is valid for 6 months, and entitles you (on a bike) to ride and purchase.
    2) Pass a practical test. This will give you a license. unrestricted, provided you're over 18. Under 18 you may only drive something like a 50cc bike.

    The trick seems to be (i don't have a license, mind - I am holding off on it to make it more difficult for me to buy a bike spontaneously) that the practical test is impossible on most big bikes. BMW GS's cope, little dirtbikes are the choice for most riders. Anything street-y (i.e. your superbikes and sport bikes) can't turn hard enough at the speeds required without throwing you off, apparently.
     
  20. Xir

    Xir Modder

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    For a new bike it' rather cheap...:eyebrow:
    As you were talking about a 550€ bike before I thought you were looking at the old ones.
     

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