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Case Mod - In Progress My first time : Project Orange

Discussion in 'Project Logs' started by Mike Shep TTW, 31 Aug 2018.

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If orange wasn't your colour, what would you pick?

  1. Red

    1 vote(s)
    50.0%
  2. Blue

    0 vote(s)
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  3. Green

    0 vote(s)
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  4. Yellow

    0 vote(s)
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  5. Purple

    1 vote(s)
    50.0%
  6. Pink

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  7. Grey

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  8. White

    0 vote(s)
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  1. Mike Shep TTW

    Mike Shep TTW New Member

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    Hi & Welcome.

    Quick intro, I'm new here. My name is Michael this is my first build log, case mod & watercooling venture. May seem small to you guys but this is just the beginning for me.

    So the idea of this case mod is just something i missed from the core p3 by thermaltake, after using it for a few months with an overclocked haswell; It missed airflow.

    So the plan was to orientate a 360 radiator or 420 on a 90 degree to direct airflow to motherboard, Graphics card, VRM heatsink & chipset etc.

    The main goal for this project is to give me confidence towards my future goal, to say I can mod & I can watercool, what better case to use than an open air P3.

    Part picking was easy, as the parts will be used in a rebuild of the same system once i moddify the case. (it was started but then put on hold).

    I wont spoil anything but there will be a clue in this build. :p

    So i knew i needed a MATX motherboard, i Decided on the z370 by asus the Gaming G wifi model.

    16gb of ram, which had to match a Grey theme, i went for the team group Vulcan.

    Graphics card i already had was the Asus GTX 1070. (big bump from my 960 2gb).

    Power supply i was spoiled for choice, as i am no stranger to custom cables, making for clients, friends and SI's.

    Decided on the shortest one i had, with adequate wattage, the Corsair AX760.

    Then drop in the 8700k.

    So lets have a quick look at the layout i had in mind.

    [​IMG]IMG_1230 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Idea is to use the standard layout / orientation but rotate the radiator.
    I needed some form of bracket which wasn't too much trouble off the shelf.

    Also the chassis was never inteded for an ATX PSU mounted verticaly with an MATX motherboard along with the vertical graphics card. So some challenges were up ahead.

    So after mounting the board, i knew i wanted the cables to come out of individual holes from the chassis and soon to be acrylic sheet to hide all the cutout holes.

    I wanted the 24 pin 8 pin and not to sure yet PCIE power to be parallel with the board connector. I used a housing to mark this and used a comb to mark the centre holes.

    [​IMG]IMG_1239 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1240 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    I had a hexgear comb that i planned to use for the 24, so i eyed up the connector to the underside of the board and sketched around the comb to mark the holes. Used the convenient tapped hole as my starter for Pin 1 :p

    [​IMG]IMG_1242 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1245 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1246 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    With the cable points marked in, time to assemble the radiator, fans and brackets.

    [​IMG]IMG_1294 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Once they were together i offered them to the chassis and tried to use the original case cutouts to use a threaded screw and nut. I planned on using the case cutouts to thread the fan cables through also. I marked the locations with some sticky dots.

    [​IMG]IMG_1301 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Now the PSU.

    I didnt want to be drilling some 50 + holes by hand to thread the PSU cables through the chassis. so decided to make "to scale" a mirror of the PSU face to mark out what i would need to cut out of the chassis. Then i would use the same mirror scale measurement to drill the holes only through the acrylic.

    [​IMG]IMG_1250 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1303 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    So with that marked up, I applied the factory acrylic window making sure it was square at all edges. Decided to drill through the acrylic with a 4mm wood bit and step up with the radiator bracket.

    [​IMG]IMG_1304 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Stepped up to a sharp 5mm bit to better fit the hardware I had, quick test fit and i was happy so far.

    [​IMG]IMG_1306 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1307 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Next was the fan cable locations after mounting the radiator fans. I turned to the rear of the case and marked where the cables come out from the fan corner.

    [​IMG]IMG_1308 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    This next bit i found hard but came out good with some patient filing. Started at the top of the round cutout on the chassis and drilled several holes to the bottom.

    [​IMG]IMG_1310 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Looked hideous but, some filing later; came up great.

    [​IMG]IMG_1312 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    EPS 8 Pin power.

    [​IMG]IMG_1316 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    I thought only 8 holes, i would start of easy; picked up the 4mm wood bit and used a cut out of a to scale diagram. Plunged the bit into the centre of the marking stopped once i got to the metal. Swapped to a 2mm bit for a pilot hole, then upped to the 4mm metal bit once the 2mm came through.

    [​IMG]IMG_1318 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Metal was thick here, bits are hardly used and sharp took a little time.

    [​IMG]IMG_1323 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Was very happy with this 8 pin, came out perfectly.

    Dreading the 24 pin, I dove straight in; trying to use the same technique. Was going well until i ran into metal, then became tricky. Once i was done it looked so messy, some filing, much filing was needed.

    [​IMG]IMG_1325 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1329 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Taking what i learned i moved over to the PSU side of things.

    [​IMG]IMG_1332 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Placed down the diagram of the face of the PSU, marked which connectors i didn't need, then drilled the rest with the 4mm wood bit.

    Done what i could and skipped the metal this time. Done some little tiding and decided to cut some metal away with the dremel and cutting tool. Took the chassis outside, cut out the large portion of the PSU area and the hideous metal catastrophe that was the 24 pin. Did a little grinding on the 8 Pin with a round grinding stone i had, perfect for the hole, was nice and smooth for a cable routed through.

    [​IMG]IMG_1338 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    2 Cutting wheels later, the PSU side was out, took some cutting, very thick case & strong.

    [​IMG]IMG_1341 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Went back in and finished the hole drilling PSU side & filed to my hearts content to get this looking as good as i can.

    [​IMG]IMG_1347 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Once i was happy, next was mounting the motherboard to the acrylic. Friend recommended me the tap and drill bit style.

    I practiced on the tray behind the motherboard which would be getting cut out at some point. Did a straight tap no issues, also a 2mm pilot hole followed by a tap.

    I opted for the 2mm pilot then the M3 tap, for greater accuracy. Used a torque setting of 15 on my old XRP dewalt drill, some 20 years old, inherited of course and a little wd40 for lubricant. I found this was the best setting, it hit too much resistance at 13/14 setting. Speed 1 setting to have consistent speed of a tap, then simply pop in reverse after all the way in.

    [​IMG]IMG_1364 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Marked up which Standoffs i would need then got to work, tested the alignment with a dummy motherboard. Wasn't 100% perfect but enough to leave a little wiggle room to get it square.


    [​IMG]IMG_1358 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Last thing before i test fitted was the PSU brackets, using the factory holes with the tap i just cut out the acrylic, enough to pass a longer screw into the chassis. 4mm hole again after identifying the correct holes.

    [​IMG]IMG_1363 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1365 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Next was the Vertical GPU Bracket.

    Lined up after mounting the dummy motherboard.

    [​IMG]IMG_1401 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    decided which holes were needed

    In the end, had to drill 3 fresh holes which i decided to nut & bolt to the chassis.

    [​IMG]IMG_1404 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Quick mounting i lined up the PCIE Cover bracket. marked the holes for tapping.

    Couldnt nut and bolt here as it was too close to the chassis edge.

    [​IMG]IMG_1405 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1406 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1407 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Quick trial fit & then move on to wrapping.

    Ordered some 750 x 750mm white matt vinyl wrap.

    Simply laid over and trimmed the edges with an hobby knife.

    Cutting the holes was easy, quick circle motion and the fine needle file took up any excess.

    [​IMG]IMG_1419 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    So next was to test fit all the hardware. So loaded the wrapped acrylic with the standoffs.

    [​IMG]IMG_1423 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Mounted the motherboard, next was radiator brackets and radiator.

    [​IMG]IMG_1425 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Then to the GPU Support bracket.

    As i never had the mobo on standoffs there was some clearance issues and some of the vertical bracket had to go.

    [​IMG]IMG_1427 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1430 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Then had to cut 4mm or so from the PSU Bracket to get the central bracket to fit on top of the vertical GPU bracket.

    Touch up with some nail varnish from the mrs. Perfect.

    Got the bracket installed, PSU Tied down along with the motherboard i would be using.

    [​IMG]IMG_1442 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr


    So a little blip in planning with some extra holes being drilled as i new this case wasnt fit for MATX and vertical PSU.

    Got the Grapics

    Thanks for reading, will drop a new log soon.
     
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  2. AML_customs_pc

    AML_customs_pc Member

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    I like all the detail, looking froward to see what you will be doing next. Great job.
     
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  3. ADmodz

    ADmodz Go hard or Go home

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    nice detailed logs buddy.and good to see you finally modding.i can see your modding is going to be perfect like your cables.following closely.
     
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  4. Mike Shep TTW

    Mike Shep TTW New Member

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    Thanks for the feedback buddie. You defo inspired me to get in the mod scene. No looking back.
     
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  5. Mike Shep TTW

    Mike Shep TTW New Member

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    Grandmaster Adam. *bows*

    Much love. <3
     
  6. Mike Shep TTW

    Mike Shep TTW New Member

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    Welcome back, thanks for coming back to check out my current project.

    So after some thinking, after intending to have the radiator and the inlet outlet at the bottom of the case. I now decided to mod the bracket to have the ports at the top of the case.

    This should be much cleaner for longer and less radial runs.

    So a quick mark on the brackets as there was about 4mm clearance from the screw holes matching to the radiator mounting threads. A small ) shape was needed which i grinded out with the dremel after marking.

    [​IMG]IMG_1444 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1445 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    After mounting all the hardware that would be in its final location the last thing was the res / pump combo by alphacool.

    I removed the 120 / 140 bracket and used the bare hardware that was included. I used the rear of the case to line up as close as i could towards the motherboard.

    [​IMG]IMG_1446 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Marked holes which i could get to with the drill.

    [​IMG]IMG_1447 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Drilled 2 with a 3mm wood bit, then nut and machine screwed it to the acryllic used a small spirit level then drilled the 3rd hole from the front.

    [​IMG]IMG_1449 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Mounted the Pump reservoir combo to this then lined up the lower bracket.

    [​IMG]IMG_1451 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Same again, drilled 1 hole this time. Nut and machine screw used the spirit level marked holes 2 and 3 then checked for clearancnces.

    [​IMG]IMG_1454 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    After closer inspection, i decided it was too close to the radiator.

    Dismounted the hardware from the acryllic and moved the brackets 4mm to the left away from the radiator. Did this by eye, any more and the holes would be visible and acrylic ruined.

    Much better clearance this time.

    After the res combo was mounted, i knew how much space was left for the SSD.

    Decided i wasnt going to remove any more chassis as you never know how much integrity was left, strong it may be.

    So i used a spare 15 pin power housing by molex. Used a light under the acrylic to show where the chassis was.

    Once i had it in position 5 4mm holes were drilled for the Power cables.

    [​IMG]IMG_1471 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Then it was gauging the Sata III. Thought drilling a T Shape where i could slot the straight connector in, thread the cable in then twist to fit the housing into.

    Used an 8mm bit, grouped close together and then used square and straight needle files to a snug fit.

    [​IMG]IMG_1489 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1493 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1492 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    After the SSD res was mounted i decided to put the 8 pin power for the GPU in a small vertical gromit through the acrylic. It would surfice and avoid going through more steel.

    Same principles as before, 4mm wood bit as a pilot then 4mm all the way using the stencil i made.

    [​IMG]IMG_1467 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1469 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Once happy i moved to the drain part of the res combo.

    used a 28mm hole saw after measuring from the bracket centre screw down and guessing a fitting size from the web as i didnt have my hardware at this point.

    [​IMG]IMG_1456 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1510 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1511 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    The next headache was the front io usb 2 3 corsair hub to USB header.

    Decided to run them behind the motherboard, i knew i had a difficult task as the gauge of the wires were thick.

    used a 12mm wood bit through an existing gromit.

    [​IMG]IMG_1506 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1512 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Quick Test fit, i felt as though there was too much flex or interfereance from cables. I decided to cut out as much acrylic as i could.

    [​IMG]IMG_1517 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1519 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1520 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Took the jigsaw to it. Covered most of the rear of the motherboard, i didnt want any gaps on show so about an inch within the standoffs would surfice.

    [​IMG]IMG_1523 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1522 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    A Full reassemble and then it was on to cables.

    [​IMG]IMG_1527 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1529 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1530 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Im no stranger to cables. Done them in every system i have built. Which isnt many, 9 or so; for my self, family or budget system from old hardware to other people in the community.

    Aswell as an ebay shop for some time then to custom extensions / modular cables for 5 years.

    Decided to start small doing the PCIE and the EPS 1st.

    Using a spare wire i ran from A to B then measured where it ended up.

    i didnt repeat this for all the cables, they wouldnt be on show, so cut 8 wires, crimped on end, sleeved and then crimped the other & melted the paracord to the connector.

    [​IMG]IMG_1536 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1535 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1537 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1538 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    used a comb to keep the cables together and used one once through the acrylic to not lose track of the wire grouping.

    [​IMG]IMG_1539 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1542 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Then pushed through the appropriate hole PSU side and pushed into the connector plugged into the PSU trained the cables that were on show. Tied the rear down if possible.

    [​IMG]IMG_1543 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1544 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Exact same principle for the PCIE Side.

    Exept the Double wire which was inserted last.

    [​IMG]IMG_1545 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr
     
  7. Mike Shep TTW

    Mike Shep TTW New Member

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    24 Pin was challenging, again found a length that worked, connected all the wires that were not double wires.

    [​IMG]IMG_1547 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Getting all 19 or so to stay in place was a challenge, decided to use a comb sandwich between the acrylic, worked best to keep the cables in the correct hole.

    [​IMG]IMG_1548 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1550 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1553 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1555 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Once they were all in, i put the double wires in. Then labeled each individual wire 1 to 24.

    [​IMG]IMG_1556 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Then same principal as before, to the corresponding 10 pin or 18 pin PSU Side.

    [​IMG]IMG_1558 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    As you can see its getting there and the orange really pops.

    [​IMG]IMG_1561 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    I discovered i made an error and drilled the ground and 3.3v not 12v so i made this to a sata power. Then another to the other side and then the 12v from the peripheral connector on the PSU for the Pump.

    [​IMG]IMG_1595 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1596 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    The pump would be powered directly, not via molex or other means.

    I Simply removed the 4 pin from the housing, snip and crimp with the female mini fit jr connector. Then directly to the PSU. I used black as GND and orange and 12v.

    [​IMG]IMG_1581 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1584 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Sata Power i needed 3, SSD and the corsair HUBs.

    Same idea. Measure cut crimp sleeve and plug up.

    [​IMG]IMG_1546 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1592 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1594 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    didnt have to be too clean, just get the job done.

    Final Touches.

    The SSD previously modded for an initial case mod. I Added some orange wrap to the I as i will remove later for the initial red theme.

    [​IMG]IMG_1615 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Mounting i used 3m tape, which came off after clamping on for 24 hours.

    Moved to double sided hook and loop tape.

    Was manoverable and good clearance from the Acrylic.

    [​IMG]IMG_1619 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Leveling out the vertical GPU mount.

    I used some PETG tubing cut to size and wrapped in the matte white wrap between the PSU bracket. Level job done.

    [​IMG]IMG_1652 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1654 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1655 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Watercooling drain.

    Simple plan, had to use an extension for clearance through the acrylic to a fitting to a simple cheap BSP 1/4 tap. Some sites were out of stock or wanting some £12 for a ball drain valve. Crazy.

    Some Mayhems tubing between. Perfect.

    [​IMG]IMG_1679 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1680 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Next Log will be watercooling.

    Quick tease for you.

    [​IMG]IMG_1674 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Thanks for reading.
     
  8. AML_customs_pc

    AML_customs_pc Member

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    Great up date, I like all the photos. I am looking forward to see how you run the loop
     
  9. kim

    kim Active Member

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    Great start :thumb:, very clean work on the cables...following too
     
  10. DÈF¥âÑt¸.·´¯`¤

    DÈF¥âÑt¸.·´¯`¤ Active Member

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    Very clean work and some cool ideas :rock:
     
  11. Vault-Tec

    Vault-Tec Green Plastic Watering Can

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    Nice work man.
     
  12. Mike Shep TTW

    Mike Shep TTW New Member

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    Thanks for the great feedback. Your a great audience.
     
  13. Mike Shep TTW

    Mike Shep TTW New Member

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    Welcome back to part 3,

    So everything is wired up, appart from the fans & some leds which i will be looking to add to the cavity & GPU mount once completed.

    So i had a basic idea where i wanted to run the loop.

    Pump to GPU to CPU to Rad to Pump.

    I started with the CPU to Rad 1st. As i thought it would be the most challenging and would be best to get it out of the way.

    [​IMG]IMG_1633 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1635 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    A few lengths and bubble formed tubes later i gave up and moved to the RAD to PUMP.

    Straight length to a short bend.

    Got this one 1st time. I just did by eye, no fancy tools or bending templates.

    [​IMG]IMG_1636 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Went from the Pump to the GPU and got it there abouts and perfected the bends and degree over a few goes.

    [​IMG]IMG_1637 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1641 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    the GPU to GPU was slightly off, unsure wether this was due to me not lining up the GPU mount as from the factory.

    but either way, short run with a little heat and a wiggle.

    Loosened of the GPU then sandwiched in then tightened the GPU down. Nice fit.

    [​IMG]IMG_1640 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Back to the bend i started with.

    I just couldnt get the angle right the way i originaly inteded it to be.

    As it had some Z travel

    So decided i would use the fitting at a right angle. made it easier for me to do a bend before the fitting and not on it pretty much.

    Happy how this one turned out.

    [​IMG]IMG_1675 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    After some lining up, getting happy, trimming mm off here and there, i removed all the parts and gave them a little wash in DI.

    Overall im pretty happy with myself.

    Ruined a few O rings from not deburring as much as i should have. Over heating. I found a slow pace was best, took alot of time to warm up. Moving it too much i thought.
    But confident to do it again.

    Then i prepared the RAD for a mayhems blitz.

    I know it was new, but was informed that mayhems pastal loves clean rads.

    As instructed, did blitz one and 2.

    after some soaking and PH checking, several rinses.

    [​IMG]IMG_1670 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1669 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1671 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Hooked everything back up to the loop and did a test leak with DI water.

    [​IMG]IMG_1672 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1673 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1674 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Used a secondary PSU to run the pump only.

    Used some jerry rigging with some spare cables lying around, the black tape was the GND.

    [​IMG]IMG_1685 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1686 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1688 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1690 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1692 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Leak free, i drained the loop, best i can, i feel as though there was some in the rad, but this thing was heavy, was like playing a game of screwball scramble to get the last DI out.

    [​IMG]IMG_1693 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1694 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1695 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Quickly popped in the mayhems and watched in awe at the gorgeousness that was mayhems pastel.

    [​IMG]IMG_1696 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1697 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Again let it run just to further leak test.

    Cycled the pump a few times to get some air out once it was all topped up.
     
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  14. Mike Shep TTW

    Mike Shep TTW New Member

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    Part 4 will be the fan threaded through the acrylic, some lighting behind the acrylic LED strip on the GPU mount.

    Will take some glamour shots once all the lighting is sorted out :)

    Happy reading.
     
  15. AML_customs_pc

    AML_customs_pc Member

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    Nice update, the orange just pops with the white, looking forward to the next update.
     
  16. Mike Shep TTW

    Mike Shep TTW New Member

    Joined:
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    Welcome back.

    So threading these fans invloved using the 4 pin removal tool, to remove the molex KK type housing. threading them through, re pin the housing side.

    Using a small PCB fan splitter i applied the 3 fans and kept the pump on the board.

    The RGB side was a little more difficult.

    I used one side of a ATX removal tool, to push the pin tab in, then remove then re bend the tab up and re insert once threaded.

    repeated this 3 times for each fan. Routed best i could.

    [​IMG]IMG_1698 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1699 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1702 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1703 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1704 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1706 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1707 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1708 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1712 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1713 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1721 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Glass window to finnish,

    had a grey laminate glass window made up by a local glazer.

    Made a copy of the acrylic before the mods.

    I had to make a small bush from some 8/10 ID OD tubing i had around. cut a small O made a C shape as it was too big slightly.

    Cut it flush to fit the 8mm hole to hold the m6 thread i beleive on the mounting hardware of the chassis.

    [​IMG]IMG_1717 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1718 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1719 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1720 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1722 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1724 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    LED Strip on the GPU Side.

    Measure and cut to size a white LED Strip.

    Solder 2 wires to + & - I marked the - with a black mark.

    Crimped with Molex KK type fan header pin and plugged up to the appropriate point on the housing.

    Sleeved before hand in black paracord.

    Sticky flexible magnets were applied to the back to hold it to the metal bracket.

    [​IMG]IMG_1761 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1763 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1764 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Helping hands and Pre "blobbing" :D

    [​IMG]IMG_1764 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1766 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1769 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1771 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1774 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    Last thing was to had some ambient lighting to the rear mobo tray / acrylic sheet.

    I modified a current typical RBG strip you get from ebay just converted to run on DC from the PSU over DC from an AC outlet.

    Currently it was set up to run on a different PSU.

    So made an extension from the PSU.

    2 holes added for 12v and ground. PSU Side Small 8 pin to 6 pin female.

    Sleeve to match.

    [​IMG]IMG_1821 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1822 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1823 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1824 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1825 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1827 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1829 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1835 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1832 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1830 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1834 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr




    Some Pictures before boot up.

    [​IMG]IMG_1841 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1838 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr

    [​IMG]IMG_1836 by Michael Sheppard, on Flickr
     
    Cheapskate and AML_customs_pc like this.
  17. Cheapskate

    Cheapskate Insane? or just stupid?

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    That back end wiring looks like some of my work. :lol:
     
  18. AML_customs_pc

    AML_customs_pc Member

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    Looking good buddy.

    Cheapskate it will be ok once you get the back panel on out of site of of mind.
     

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