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Storage NAS drives

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Sky_wolf, 9 Dec 2016.

  1. Sky_wolf

    Sky_wolf What's a Dremel?

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    I am locking to invest in a 2 bay NAS a Synology.
    now to the HDD. I now that the best is a NAS drive
    but what would you recommend
     
  2. IanW

    IanW Grumpy Old Git

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    I've been running a 16-bay server full of WD Red 3TB drives without issue for a couple years now.
     
  3. Votick

    Votick My CPU's hot but my core runs cold.

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    WD Red's are always a good choice.

    Welcome to Synology :)
     
  4. IanW

    IanW Grumpy Old Git

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    I heard the 4TB ones had "issues", so I'm slowly replacing my 3's with 6's as funds allow.

    ( 2 down, 14 to go! :eeek: )
     
  5. meandmymouth

    meandmymouth Modder

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    I've got three WD 4TB Red's and they've been fine for me. One is sat in a Synology NAS at the moment. I had a couple 2TB Greens in a NAS for a while and they were fine.

    I think the Seagate NAS drives are cheaper than WD so worth a look.
     
  6. Mighty_Miro_WD

    Mighty_Miro_WD What's a Dremel?

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    Hi @Sky_wolf!

    I have 4x2TB WD Red drives in my NAS, so I'd suggest them as well.

    As for the NAS drives, I absolutely agree with you - they are the best option for NAS devices because of their firmware. They are optimized to use less power, cause less vibration and a specific build-in feature called TLER, which stops the hard drive from entering into a deep recovery cycle. For instance, a desktop drive will try, try and try again to get your data back if a sector's not reading properly and this will result in timeouts, etc. A NAS not be dropped from a RAID array since it will enter in deep recovery cycle to attempt to repair the error, recover the data from the problematic area, and then reallocate a dedicated area to replace the problematic area.

    Hope this helps and have awesome Holidays! :)
     
  7. noizdaemon666

    noizdaemon666 I'm Od, Therefore I Pwn

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    I have a deep, deep dislike of WD hard drives in general, but especially their more targeted drives. I've seen so, so many Reds fail and take all the data with them. It's similar with Seagate HDDs, though they seem to have got better recently.

    I'd personally recommend Toshiba drives. After seeing hundreds of them go past, their failure rate is much lower.
     
  8. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Lover of bit-tech Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    Man who works for Western Digital in recommends Western Digital products shock! Film at 11! ;)

    I'll just chime in here with my usual recommendation of splitting your NAS between models at worst and manufacturers at best. There have been cases in the past of manufacturing or firmware faults which take drives out in bulk; I was still a sysadmin when a bunch of Seagate drives were found to have a firmware bug which completely killed the drives when they hit X number of power-on hours. Lots of very angry people with RAID arrays that were now completely empty 'cos the drives all failed at once. Not a happy time.

    Split your NAS between manufacturers: get one WD and one Toshiba, or whichever brands you like. Also, make sure you've got a tested backup plan in place: 'cos (say it with me, now) RAID is not a backup.
     

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