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Windows New Sandy Bridge with old XP = BSOD!

Discussion in 'Tech Support' started by davey_wavey, 6 Apr 2011.

  1. davey_wavey

    davey_wavey New Member

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    Hey Guys,

    Hope you can help...

    I've just upgraded the CPU, Motherboard and RAM of my computer and (naively) thought I could just uninstall the previous chipset drivers and everything would be hunka-dory. Unfortunately that isn't the case. (I removed the previous nVidia chipset drivers using Driver Sweeper.)

    Upon a successful POST the computer will display the Windows XP loading screen, the bar will move back and forth for ~5seconds but then a BSOD will flash up for a millisecond and the computer will reboot. I managed to make a video and pause it to read the STOP notice which is 0x000000078. In safe mode it does the same: after all the drivers have loaded it will BSOD / reboot.

    Old computer specs are in my signature. The new parts I'm having problems with are the Intel i5 2500k, ASUS P8P67-M + Dominator DDR3 8GB.

    Is there a way I can keep my current XP build with my new CPU, Mobo + RAM?

    Many thanks in advance

    David
     
  2. IvanIvanovich

    IvanIvanovich будет глотать вашу душу.

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    no there is no way to keep your old xp install on entirely different hardware. besides that why are you still using an 11 year old os? that hardware is completely wasted with xp. enjoy using 3gb out of your 8gb of ram? you really should be installing windows 7 x64.
     
  3. murraynt

    murraynt Well-Known Member

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    +1

    It's nicer to look at, easier to use, More secure, faster, utalises all your ram, better memory management.

    OH i could go on...

    Trust me when I say this.
    The upgrade from Xp - Windwows 7 is a bigger upgrade than your old Q6600 to the 2500K

    You best option is just a clean install TBH. I had to do it when I got my 2500k.
     
  4. RichCreedy

    RichCreedy Hey What Who

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    have you tried a repair install of windows from the xp disk?

    boot from windows cd/dvd, go through the process as if your going to install windows again

    when it asks about recovery console, ignore that, and get to the stage where you are going to install windows

    tell it to install on the partition thats already there, it should check, and ask if you want to repair the current install

    yes to that, and hopefully when its finally done, you should be able to run windows again, you will be asked for your license key again, and you will need to do all the windows updates again.


    but you should really upgrade to win 7 :)
     
  5. NethLyn

    NethLyn Member

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    Backup your files whether in normal or safe mode then if you really want to use XP just reformat and let Windows redetect the lot, Rich has had better experiences with XP repairs than I have, it's never bleedin' worked for me.

    But bribe a handy student and get Win7 for even less, or see if there's any Easter offer on the retail versions in a couple of weeks.
     
  6. thelaw

    thelaw New Member

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    Bear in mind with Win 7 if your a heavy gamer that alot of your older favorite Win XP games will not work on windows 7...that is what i found
     
  7. azrael-

    azrael- I'm special...

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    Contrary to what some of the previous posters have said it's perfectly possible to upgrade your hardware while still running your existing copy of Windows XP. You just need to make sure to uninstall *every* driver pertaining to your old hardware and then keep the latest service pack as well as all necessary new drivers handy. Although of course a clean install would be best.

    As for your current predicament, you wouldn't by any chance have been running some sort of RAID or just AHCI hard disk setup with your previous hardware? If so, that might be the root cause of your problems and it's pretty hard to fix. Or perhaps it's the other way around and your UEFI is set to AHCI and/or RAID mode by default. That won't work with XP unless it already has the correct drivers.
     
  8. RichCreedy

    RichCreedy Hey What Who

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    which ones, as i have most games working on win 7 64bit, you might have to tweak things, am sure we on here can help
     
  9. GoodBytes

    GoodBytes How many wifi's does it have?

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    Never use a legacy OS, with modern hardware.
    Yes XP is sooo old, it doesn't even know half the technologies in your computer. Therefor it's a legacy OS. You should consider it as if you are installing Windows 95 on your old system. Sounds ridiculous, but that exactly what you are doing now.

    Please install Windows Vista or 7 (I recommend 7).

    I provide no support to XP system installed on a new system, because it's like solving a huge puzzles with missing peaces which appear and disappears every now and then.
     
  10. davey_wavey

    davey_wavey New Member

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    Thanks a lot for all the replies.

    The original reason to keep the XP build was so I could play a few newer games for the next week or so then rebuild it with an SSD and Windows 7.

    I've gone ahead and purchased them now and everything is working.

    Thanks again
     
  11. GoodBytes

    GoodBytes How many wifi's does it have?

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    Before installing Win7, be sure to set HPET mode to 64-bit in the BIOS, and set your SATA controller to AHCI (or RAID if you have one). To get the most of our of your computer (and TRIM support for your SSD with AHCI/RAID)
     
  12. AstralWanderer

    AstralWanderer New Member

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    You do realise there is software for XP that can use memory above 3GB via PAE? (4 ramdisk utilities and a couple of caches come to mind). And that PAE can manage 4 times more memory (64GB) than the 64-bit version of Windows 7 Home Premium?
     
  13. GoodBytes

    GoodBytes How many wifi's does it have?

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    And you battle with the GPU memory reserved by Windows.. not smart.. not smart at all.
    Home Premium limit is artificial. Beside few people has more than 16GB of RAM in their system.
    Pro and up has a 192GB limit, and no one knows if it's another artificial limit or a "we don't support Windows 7 more than that as we did not do any tests above 192GB" type of limit.

    PAE is not to be touched (with a 32-bit CPU/OS). This feature severely reduce system performance (splitting/merging instructions as the CPU only take 32-bit long instructions at a time). This feature is designed for specific cases where memory is more important than anything else. And your software is limited to 32-bit. Also Microsoft reports of possible drivers problem, which is also mentioned on the wiki page you provided.

    Don't be try to be a smart-ass. If it was advantageous, than no OS would put the 4GB limit for their 32-bit version (which is also a CPU limit). I think the OS developers knows a bit more on that domain than you. And you should follow their recommendations.
     
  14. N17 dizzi

    N17 dizzi Well-Known Member

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    GoodBytes...

    I upgraded to an ssd without really looking into what settings I should set (stupid I know)

    I haven't got hbet 64bit or achi mode enabled on my rig which is running Win 7 Home Premium 64bit

    How much performance am I losing?

    Feel like a total nub lol
     
  15. GoodBytes

    GoodBytes How many wifi's does it have?

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    I believe you can set HPET after you installed Windows. Well if you get a BSOD at startup.. you know you can't do it after Windows is installed (you can put it back safely, and Windows will boot as before)

    HPET is a Intel CPU feature that assures better timing. I don't know the performance drop
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Precision_Event_Timer

    AHCI (and RAID) provides:
    > eSATA support
    > Hot swappable feature to any drive
    > Native Command Queue (very beneficial for HDD's, could help SSD's but unsure.. in fact I don't know if SSD's even support that as they are so fast now).
    > TRIM support (Win7 or newer required), which prevents fast diminishing of the life span (well I should say, performance reduction, to be correct - I assume a slow SSD being a dead one, like a rechargeable battery that doesn't hold a long charge anymore, despite still functioning) of an SSD
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TRIM
     
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  16. AstralWanderer

    AstralWanderer New Member

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    Not an issue with recent motherboards (such as the Gigabyte UD3R) which map GPU memory above the 4GB level.
    The fact that this limit exists should suffice - and systems exceeding it will be commonplace in a couple of years.
    It's artificial also - Windows Server 2008 supports up to 2TB.
    Have you done any research into PAE? There's no instruction splitting at all since it only changes memory access (see MSDN: Physical Address Extension for details) and has to be enabled for DEP/NX to function.
    And these issues apply to 64-bit OSes running 32-bit software also...
    Then I guess that the likes of Windows 2000 Datacenter (16GB limit with PAE) and Windows Server 2003 Enterprise/Datacenter (64GB limit with PAE) didn't exist then?

    And since I have been using PAE for several months (VSuite ramdisk containing the pagefile and temporary files folder) I have actual experience to draw on, rather than guesses and theories.
     
  17. N17 dizzi

    N17 dizzi Well-Known Member

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    Thanks GoodBytes...

    I guess what I am trying to ask is, is it worth the annoying effort of reinstalling win 7 to get trim?

    Baring in mind, our SSD doesn't have much written to it hardly... paging file, hibernation and system restore are all switched off and I have every program on it we use with about 33 GB left

    Is it worth it?
     
  18. AstralWanderer

    AstralWanderer New Member

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    Try running Crystal DiskMark - the fourth test (which uses queue depth) should show what performance difference AHCI can make on your system.
     
  19. GoodBytes

    GoodBytes How many wifi's does it have?

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    No it doesn't. you still have 4GB - GPU memory. This is a Windows thing.

    Yup that is why Windows 8 will come out well before, and like previous "Home Premium" editions, that limit will increase as well. So no worries.


    Doesn't mean that its Server 2008 is based on Windows 7 or vise versa that it's supported by Microsoft. If they choose to not test or support more than 192GB of RAM, as they think that no one at home or office desktop computer has more than that, than well it's untested, therefor not supported. Same story with software in a few years back. Notice, if you remember that many software company never says that their software is Windows Me supported, even some put in red bold that Windows Me is not supported by their software. Yet it still works fine. It's just mean, that if you have any problem... you are on your own.

    We won't know for sure until you have a computer with more than 192 of RAM to test this.


    Ah, but you are assuming that the CPU of the computer a 64-bit one. Sorry but if you have a 64-bit CPU, it's just silly to use a 32-bit OS. If you wanted a 32-bit CPU.. then go buy a 32-bit CPU. Don't spend money on a 64-bit one if your not going to use it.


    Datacenter is more memory intensive than CPU wise, and could afford this feature.
    Also Server 2003 is available in 64-bit and every 64-bit OS for our x86-x64 (our 64-bit CPU's in our computers) architecture has it, as the CPU supports it, and allow, on paper, 16EB of RAM.

    Good for you. It's not my computer.

    I like to take full advantage of my computer power, don't like to trow away my hard earn money. So I install 64-bit OS with my 64-bit CPU to take full advantage of it, even though 99% of my programs are in 32-bit. Just having the OS in 64-bit (ignoring the RAM) it well worth it, as I believe it even benefits 32-bit programs as well a bit, and also this is a fact: be able to sue additional security systems.

    Unlike some people, I don't buy a Ferrari to drive it in school zooms where the limit is set to 30km/h.
     
  20. AstralWanderer

    AstralWanderer New Member

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    I've been running an SSD RAID on WinXP for several months (discussed here) and not seen any performance degradation (using CrystalDiskMark to check periodically).

    I'd suggest in your case, having the paging file enabled (as Microsoft caution against disabling it) ideally on a Ramdisk (if you have RAM to spare) or on a non-SSD drive. Also consider moving the Temporary files folder off SSD (and ensure you update the TEMP/TMP Environment variables to point to the new location).
     
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