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News Obama sides with Cameron on cryptography stance

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by Gareth Halfacree, 19 Jan 2015.

  1. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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  2. David

    David RIP Tel

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    If they can prove they can be trusted not to abuse the ability to break commercially available encryption, people might not be so anti. Unfortunately, thanks to a Mr Snowden, they've all been caught with their hands in the till and it is incredibly unlikely they'll be able to recover what little trust we had in them.

    I think they realise this and this why why they're suddenly being so bold about it - they've used up every last shred of public goodwill in this arena and have decided to brass neck it.
     
  3. IvanIvanovich

    IvanIvanovich будет глотать вашу душу.

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    I think they might as well just get it over with and do what they really want... to implant thought control devices in everyones (of course the 1% wealthiest, and other select persons will be excluded) brain.
     
  4. Corky42

    Corky42 Where's walle?

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    These two don't seem to know if they're coming or going, in one speech they go on about taking steps to improve cybersecurity, and then complain about encryption.
     
  5. adam_bagpuss

    adam_bagpuss Have you tried turning it off/on ?

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    even if they ban encryption the bad guys will still use one that doesnt have a back door. The only people this would hurt is yet again the companies, entities and people on the street who are not doing anything wrong
     
  6. Nexxo

    Nexxo Queue Jumper

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    I hear they're saying that in the UK there are whole cities that are pirated and only hackers live there any more and for anyone who isn't a hacker it's a no-go area. Not even the police go there. The whole place is ruled by Open Source and normal DRM law doesn't apply... It's them radicalist cyberhacker types man! :p
     
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  7. Pookie

    Pookie So this is permanence, love's shattered pride.

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    Just as I start using my new protonmail address :)
     
  8. Dogbert666

    Dogbert666 *Fewer Staff Administrator

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    Awesome.
     
  9. David

    David RIP Tel

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    Are you trolling Fox News? ;)

    Apparently, someone tweeted that muslim extremism is on the rise in the Scottish highlands, due to the increasing influence of the radical cleric Mullah Kintyre.
     
  10. Nexxo

    Nexxo Queue Jumper

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    ^^^ I chuckled. :lol:
     
  11. schmidtbag

    schmidtbag New Member

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    Reminds me a lot of the gun ownership issue, but that's a topic for another day.


    I really can't believe how idiotic Obama and Cameron are. The sole purpose of encryption is to NOT get hacked. Having a proven hackable encryption defeats the purpose of it. Might as well just tell people "yeah go ahead and take my stuff, but could you just wait a few hours?"

    Also - where you do draw the line? If hackable encryption is legally required everywhere, that means the government needs it too. If the government CAN be hacked, what protects them from the enemy? But if they happen to have something that can't be hacked, what gives them the right to be the exception to the rule?
    How are they going to enforce this on a worldwide scale? By enforcing such a law, they're basically telling the entire world "hey with a little bit of your time, you can have anything you want in our countries".
    What prevents any corporation from just hacking their competitors and stealing information?

    This is truly one of the worst ideas governments have ever come up with.
     
  12. Cheapskate

    Cheapskate Insane? or just stupid?

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    ...And as soon as we find this place Da' Man will hold up his Nobel Peace Prize to signal the carpet bombing.
     
  13. Corky42

    Corky42 Where's walle?

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    If an election was just around the corner it could be seen as one of the best.
     
  14. Anfield

    Anfield Well-Known Member

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    A very high price to pay to keep Milicreep and Farage at bay though.
     
  15. Corky42

    Corky42 Where's walle?

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    Yea because politicians always follow through on what they say don't they.
    Cameron probably knows what he proposes is never going to happen, it's simply electioneering.

    A good 90% of the population is going to hear what he said about encryption and nod in agreement, they will think he is being tough on terrorists and to be keeping us safe.
     
  16. Locknload

    Locknload Jolly Good Egg

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    Ok Dave mate!.

    This encryption lark has never been about terrorism, it is about control.
    The government is whoring your information to corporations, insurance companies, in fact anyone registered at companies house basically, or any human that needs air in order to live.

    They are using the snooping to beat down any government detractors, look what happening with the plebgate scandal . They wanted all the information from personal calls and emails so they could decide how to discredit all those that sided against the politicians...then apply the pressure so they change their mind and give up.
    Everything is manipulated.
    They included income from porn and prostitution for the first time in the GDP calculations, which is comical, then tried to ban porn on the internet..

    The tories are a complete sham, Davey is a snake oil salesman with the morals of a sewer rat.

    THE TTIP will bring this country to its knees and are irreversible.

    Please don't let this happen!
     
  17. edzieba

    edzieba Virtual Realist

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    Regardless of any moral issues, this would be technically impossible to implement. Public/Private key encryption (particularly key exchange), the system on which effectively all net-based encryption relies, cannot have a backdoor without fundamentally compromising the encryption system itself. Mathematics does not change for political convenience.
     
  18. Corky42

    Corky42 Where's walle?

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    Wasn't it the EU that included prostitution in their calculations of GDP ?
     
  19. Locknload

    Locknload Jolly Good Egg

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    NO IT WAS INCLUDED IN THE CHANCELLORS EXTENDED BUDGET REVIEW, GEORGE OSBOURNE ADDED IT.

    He also included in his GDP projections the "income" from illegal drug use (heroin, cocaine, methamphetamine etc).
     
  20. Corky42

    Corky42 Where's walle?

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    I thought it was the ONS (Office for National Statistics) that calculated GDP, and that they only included illegal drugs and prostitution because they were falling in line with EU rules.
     
    Last edited: 20 Jan 2015

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