1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Case Mod - In Progress Oceanus [Water Cooled ITX]

Discussion in 'Project Logs' started by Grym, 14 Feb 2012.

  1. Grym

    Grym New Member

    Joined:
    21 Nov 2011
    Posts:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Chapter 1 - Introduction
    Note: I learned a lot about upgrading my computer system and custom cooling from only a few forums. Bit-Tech.NET is one of the very few that I kept revisiting time and time again.

    With that being said, I just wanted to share with you a modding project I undertook a few months ago. Comments, and suggestions are always welcome as I may/can help when I decide to take this project to another level entirely.

    I wasn't sure how it would end since I was just working on an idea.

    I fell in love with ITX systems ever since I helped my girlfriend build one. At that time I was able to sell my personal computer to a friend. That left me with just enough cash to get a new bare [unmolested] gaming system together. So i thought "Hey, how much power can you cram into a small computer?"

    While mulling that thought over, it also occurred to me that it would be a great time to get into water cooling. I knew I had to save more money to gather the water cooling parts, but I could buy the PC components almost immediately. So this is what I came up with:

    CPU : Intel Core i7 2600 [I'm not an overclocker... yet!]
    MOBO : Gigabyte GAH67N-ITX
    RAM : G.Skill 4GB DDR3 1333 Mhz X 2 Dimms
    GPU : Sapphire HD6950 1GB
    PSU : Silverstone ST45SF [This PSU impressed me when it powered my previous gaming systems]
    CASE: Antec VSK 2000.

    I never had the chance to take pictures of the case [pre-molestation] because I didn't think I would be posting here.

    I managed to get this budget case at a 2nd hand price! The money I saved from the transaction will go a long way towards completing the cooling setup.

    It took me a few agonizing months to settle for this case.

    Here are some photos of its stock form from the Antec Website! ​
    [​IMG]

    Buttons, Ports and LEDs on TOP!​
    [​IMG]

    Roomy interior. Great budget-midtower for an ATX system. Let's make it ITX friendly! ​
    [​IMG]

    Top mounted PSU. Something I was watching out for! ​
    [​IMG]

    Chapter 2 - Micronization
    Using the term from the old Macross series, Micronization is a miniaturization process where a Giant race called the Zentraedi reduced their size to normal human levels. For this build, i wanted to romanticize and use the term since I'm reducing an ATX case into an ITX case.

    With my trusty marker, ruler, drill, angle grinder, dremel and a lot of cutting disks I cut a lot of excess material and reversed the motherboard tray and PSU placement.

    A cut and folded length of illustration board to mark where I'll be placing an acrylic mid-plate. ​
    [​IMG]

    2 PCI Slots for the HD6950 I'll be using! ​
    [​IMG]

    Bottom mounted PSU, top mounted Video Cards! ​
    [​IMG]

    Chapter 3 : The internals
    So this system has been with me for a month by this time. Components were slapped together fast since I was lacking a PC to use at home. ​
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Cooling parts that I've bargained for and collected from local PC enthusiasts and friends! [it's so hard to get good retail water cooling parts in my country]

    CPU Waterblock by Danger Den [flown in by a friend] ​
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    RAM Waterblock... Stick... Thingie! by Koolance! [along with a U-Connector / flown in by a friend] ​
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Chipset Waterblock by Koolance! [flown in by a friend] ​
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    MCP355 Pump by Swiftech with Pump Top by EK [bargained with locally] ​
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    150 Reservoir by Bitspower [purchased locally] ​
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Small army of Compression Fittings [1/2" 3/4"], Angle Fittings [45 and 90] and other Fittings. This army will grow in time. ​
    [​IMG]

    Mix of XSPC, Bitspower and Thermochill. I got these on a bargain! ​
    [​IMG]

    Chapter 3 - Plumbing
    Last week, I wanted to start leak testing so it was time to turn into a plumber! ​
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Things I learned on my first day plumbing:
    1. Double check all fittings and tubes. Make sure they're all tight or else...
    2. Good supply of wide-ply paper to detect leaks AND soak up water.
    3. A small bucket goes a long way to making sure my table does not turn into a pool! ​

    Tangle of Tubes. ​
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Chapter 4 - Sizing things up
    I did some test fitting just so I can eyeball certain measurements.
    Here's a view of the internals with all the 1/2" tubes. The clear tubes were given for free along with some of the compression fittings. Since it's impossible for me to find replacement clear tubes, I decided to use them for test fitting and such. The white tubes are more plentiful and easier to get too. So my build will be done with all white tubes. ​
    [​IMG]

    It's a pretty snug fit with the Sapphire HD6950 on top. But I do know that it will get better with the full coverage GPU waterblock! ​
    [​IMG]

    Here's a mockup I did using leftover illustration board. This will form the midplate that separates the lower section [psu & rad] from the top section [mobo, gpu, res, pump, hdds, etc]. It's still a rough template and I was just playing around. I am dead set on having a midplate in the build, but I'm not so sure how it'll be made/done. ​
    [​IMG]

    Holes for cables to pass through. namely the 24pin power connector, the sata cables, the front headers, usb headers and the 4 pin power connector. Hmmmm! needs adjustment. ​
    [​IMG]

    View of how the midplate should separate the 2 sections. ​
    [​IMG]


    Chapter 5 - More Parts and a Facepalm
    The good news:
    [/INDENT]My friend looked over the mockup I gave him and he said he'd make it out of acrylic for me. It'll take a week since he has to sneak it in to his full schedule and he's doing it as a favor. I left the case with him so that he can make the necessary adjustments to make sure it fits perfectly. [/INDENT]

    I visited a pc parts specialist in another city and snagged a Bitspower T-Block.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    Eyeballing measurements in the case and test fitting certain parts, I was trying to figure out how i was going to fit my pump and reservoir. The res was too tall and I wasnt sure if I'll need to bore a hole through the top of the case for a fillport. If i placed the reservoir outside I wanted to keep the pump inside to take full advantage of the acrylic top on the pump and LEDs it could hold.

    I'm still debating if I need to fabricate a platform for the pump to rest on the acrylic midplate and feed water to the RAM or if it will be placed on that vacant place to the side of the mobo and below the GPU.

    Either way, the T-Block is too useful to pass up.

    I also managed to snag an XSPC Razor 6970 full coverage block! ​
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    The bad news:
    My HD6950 is not a reference design and the XSPC Razor 6970 won't fit. Luckily a friend decided to buy my HD 6950 so I have the cash for a new one. In the mean time I'm running off a GT210. a back up video card i have lying around.
    More bad news:
    There's a shortage of reference PCB HD6950s in my country. A retailer told me to wait a week, he'll see about hooking me up with one. :(

    So for now it's a waiting game for me. I can work on the Midplate and the color scheme that I want for the case. The water block is undergoing a leak test [no leaks so far!] ​
     
  2. Grym

    Grym New Member

    Joined:
    21 Nov 2011
    Posts:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    continued post

    Chapter 6 - Typhoon & Piecing things together
    Work on the computer slowed down the past week due to a typhoon that just visited my country! :eek:
    1.) My brother's PSU blew out when our electricity fluctuated throughout the house! His computer is pretty important since a lot of the pictures I upload were taken from his camera. Sadly, with his computer down, i won't be able to upload any pictures until his unit is up and running.​

    2.) Faced with the dilemma of replacing the HD 6950 with a reference model or replacing the waterblock, I decided to sell the video card and get a reference model. I found someone nearby selling a reference PCB HD 6950, 2GB for just under $230. with warranty [even when I told him I'm slapping a water cooling block on it, too cool!!] ​
    Pictures of HD6950 2GB with XSPC Razor 6970 to follow.

    3.) The acrylic midplate and the VSK 2000 were delivered just a few days ago.​

    Initially, I was excited because it seemed everything was perfectly aligned. It was too perfect! The midplate was cut to the inside length of the case exactly. I can't help but scratch one end while sliding the plate in. ​

    View of the videocard! ​
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Testing it out. ​
    [​IMG]

    I tried out the video card for a good amount of time. Satisfied with the performance and stability i decided it was time to get it ready.

    Mmmm, let's get it out of those clothes! ​
    [​IMG]

    Lining up the XSPC Razor water block with the HD6950. ​
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Q: Oh Grym! what wonderful stand are you using to keep everything elevated from the table?
    A: First thing that was in reach! lol​
    [​IMG]


    Lining up the fittings! ​
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Tube it! ​
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    The Video Card is too near the RAM water block. I had to use some carbon fiber sticker to insulate it. ​
    [​IMG]


    Leak Testing! ​
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    The Acrylic Mid Plate
    [​IMG]

    Fitted into the case​
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Midplate + Radiator + Everflow Fans​
    [​IMG]


    I almost cried tears of joy when all the holes aligned perfectly with the fans! ​
    [​IMG]


    Aligned perfectly on the front end. ​
    [​IMG]


    Midplate + Radiator + Everflow Fans + Case​
    [​IMG]


    Experimenting with mounting the rad + fans to the midplate. Those are leftover mounting screws from a Zalman GPU block that I will never use. ​
    [​IMG]


    At the tighter front end of the computer case, I used left over mounting screws from a Xigmatek Battleaxe GPU Cooler that was salvaged for a previous project. ​
    [​IMG]


    Checking bottom clearance... looks just about right! ​
    [​IMG]


    Glad my friend did not forget to put that hole for my cables to pass through! ​
    [​IMG]

    With the PSU installed at the back [Silverstone ST545SF; I was planning to get a regular-sized PSU but after I saw the remaining distance I may have to stick with the smaller one] ​
    [​IMG]


    Fittings on the radiator. ​
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    Pretty snug fit! ​
    [​IMG]

    The other fitting on the open-side of the computer case. Just about right! ​
    [​IMG]
    Complications!
    It turns out I did not take into account the resistance of the cables to be forced through tight corners and angles. I had to remove the left and right stands of the midplate.
    After some more fitting, I removed the midplate entirely just to cram everything into the case temporarily.

    Cabling is a RAT's NEST at the moment! ​
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Temporary placement of pump. I'm still trying to figure out the best place to put the pump. ​
    [​IMG]

    Temporary placement of the reservoir. ​
    [​IMG]

    Filling and Air-Bleeding the loop was such a pain... ​
    [​IMG]

    The PC will stay as it is for now as I figure out the rest of the cuts and other parts that will need fabrication and modification. ​

    Chapter 7 - More Cutting
    At this point in time my brother brought his camera with him when he went to a family outing. I only used my LG Cookie to take some pictures... and a majority of them were corrupted in the memory card.

    Mini Grinder Action! marked out the top of the case with pen over masking tape. Used a larger wheel on the mini grinder to make straight cuts. All of the time spent on old-cheap cases paid off! ​
    [​IMG]

    That hole will give me access to the video card water block
    Also, I'll be putting a clear-acrylic window so it looks nice and pretty! ​
    [​IMG]

    After all of that was done, I had to fit everything into the case temporarily to eyeball a few more measurements and modifications that have to be done.

    Here's the midplate installed! all the holes are populated with leftover button-head screws [i have no idea what they're called!]. ​
    [​IMG]

    I did some basic calculations and 25mm X2 [fan thickness] + 35mm [radiator thickness] + 15mm [Zalman water block screws = 100mm. I did a rough check and the plate could fall anywhere between 100mm to 110 mm and it would be a perfect fit! And it is a PERFECT fit!
    i only need to secure the radiator assembly on 3 screws to make it very stable. As it turns out, there are exactly 4 places where I can secure the Zalman mounting screws and I have exactly 4 Zalman mounting screws! ​
    [​IMG]

    So it looks like it will be a push-pull configuration with the radiator and no shroud. That's fine since, again, this isn't a system for overclocking. I just wanted better temperatures in my hot country! ​

    Since the cable access hole on the midplate was too constrictive, I had to route the thicker cables through the outer edge. I do not intend to keep it this way, but I need to have a working computer! ​
    [​IMG]

    Looking through the top, we can see the Video Card and the water block! It will look better with an acrylic/plexi water block, but I can't find any in my country. ​
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    Here's a very rough view of what the system looks like. Please forgive the bad resolution and shaky hand. ​
    [​IMG]

    Work has to slow down for a bit while I researched the necessary parts to complete it internally. I also accidentally lacerated my left hand while drilling a piece of metal that I did not secure to the table. It'll take some time to heal, but it won't stop me from continuing work or from using power tools. If anything, It's a reminder to always always be careful. ​


    Some more test fitting of components inside the case.

    Here's a shot of the internals. Please forgive the usage of a phone camera. My brother has not returned from the beach and I must make do with what I have. A male-to-male connector is holding the reservoir in place. ​
    [​IMG]


    i removed the acrylic midplate to work more on the holes at the side for cable and tube routing. Also, the Bitspower Multi-Z 150 reservoir was in the way. It seems to make this build work, I will have to get a shorter reservoir. But I wanted to check how everything would fit together. And by assembling it with what I have, I can better catalogue what other fittings I may need to bring it to that stage where it's really neat and clean. It's an absolute mess right now. ​
    [​IMG]


    I completed the temporary assembly with a spare Enermax Apolish 120mm RED fan. That is not the final fan i'll be running with. Hmmm... The inside of the res is covered with bubbles. Maybe that'll clear up over time. ​
    [​IMG]

    I turned off the rest of the lights in my room to take this shot. ​
    [​IMG]

    So pump and reservoir are mounted inside the case, but not at the best placement inside a water cooling loop. I'm not solid with the idea but it'll do for now​
     
  3. Grym

    Grym New Member

    Joined:
    21 Nov 2011
    Posts:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    continued post

    Chapter 8 - More work
    Note 1: A few things happened at this point of the build. The Gigabyte ITX Mobo got busted up and i had to replace it with the only available ITX Mobo I could get my hands on. An ECS H67H2-I.
    Note 2: The MCP355 Pump died... It seems that no one else was selling that pump so i had to grab a Laing D5.

    I have started cutting up the side-panels and plotting out the rest of the acrylic pieces for the top and side window.
    P.S. : hand is healing well! I get to keep all my fingers! :p

    We begin with the radiator. a sandwiched XSPC RS240 with 2 x 120mm Everflow fans. The fans are running through a 7v connector which cuts down on their speed and noise. ​
    [​IMG]

    With the mid-plate installed as well as a Koolance pass-through fitting, it all looks pretty clean. ​
    [​IMG]

    Here's a close up of that interesting part. The top compression fitting is by Bitspower and the bottom one is made by XSPC. When working with a strict budget, it's better to just go with the bargains. And these fittings were pretty cheap to get [albeit not as many as I'd like] ​
    [​IMG]

    Radiator + fans + mid-plate installed into the case which already has the mobo + videocard + psu​
    [​IMG]

    One of the remaining obstacles in this build... a worthy opponent! The cables need to be tidied up! Running down the side are the 2 6pin connectors for the videocard, the 24pin motherboard connector, the front headers, and some proxy cables for the 2nd phase of this project build. ​
    [​IMG]

    Since this case does not have a lot of space behind it for cable management, I had to come up with another way to hide the cables. I crafted an "L" plate out of acrylic and covered it with carbon fiber sticker. Held in place with 3 stainless steel signboard stand offs that were on sale! Now it's nice and clean! ​
    [​IMG]

    near the top of the mobo... Just below the videocard. I like how the 24 pin motherboard power connector twists just as it disappears behind the "L" plate! ​
    [​IMG]

    Just below the "L" plate, I have enough space to view the cables snaking. I can probably hide that entirely, but I do take some comfort in seeing some of the cables. ​
    [​IMG]

    The "L" plate's bottom terminates just above the ports of the HDD. This allows me to plug in the important cables of the HDD... and it looks neater this way. ​
    [​IMG]

    The Swiftech MCP355 pump died a few weeks ago and this was only replacement I could get. the Laing D5 comes with a speed controller at the bottom. Also since it was on sale, I was able to snag an EK Top to make it look good. a T-connector fitting was installed on top so that I can fill the loop through a fill port. ​
    [​IMG]

    I have to redo the cable sleeving on the D5 Pump when time permits. But for now that cables snakes down the back of the case and it disappears after the midplate... NEVER TO BE SEEN AGAIN! BWAHAHAHAHA! ahem... sorry about that. ​
    [​IMG]

    Here's a view through the rear fan grill. It's the only way to see the white XSPC Silicone tube sliding up from the mid-plate to the top of the Pump T-connector. ​
    [​IMG]

    Here's the Top fillport. I drilled a 5/8" hole and installed the 2nd Koolance pass through fitting. ​
    [​IMG]

    The stop fitting matches the 2 others on the GPU block. ​
    [​IMG]

    developed serious finger cramps fitting all of the tubes in tight spaces! but it was all worth it. The long white tube facilitates the dump of the heated water from the GPU waterblock and into the radiator through the mid-plate​
    [​IMG]

    White tissues ties around the fittings... Oceanus is now undergoing 24 hour leak testing. ​
    [​IMG]

    With a scrap piece of clear acrylic and some carbonfiber sticker, I was able to make a side panel for the midplate which makes it look very very neat and clean. Sadly it snapped. Oh well, I'll just make a new one. ​
    [​IMG]

    Chapter 9 - Cleaning up
    Right, so this build is hurtling towards its conclusion. For January, while waiting out the quarantine in my house [Chicken Pox >_>], I did some work on the PC. Mainly I wanted to experiment with flipping the radiator over and trying to find a way to install the reservoir.

    Having the radiator holes pointed up cuts down on the amount of angle fittings. BUT I'm not keen on lining up new holes on the midplate just for that.

    The T-line is great and all, but for lack of a flow meter, I end up paranoid about the watercooling setup. I keep asking myself "is the pump running? did my pump die? oh noes! is my system overheating?!" I've learned that reservoirs are not only great for holding water [which they should] but as part of the loop, they're great flow meters as well.

    I used my trusty tape measure and rulers and did a lot of calculations on my head. All of that thinking led to the same conclusion, the reservoir would fit [or not fit], by the smallest of margins, inside the case.

    NZXT Sentry Mix. ​
    [​IMG]

    Lots of Purdy Sliders! ​
    [​IMG]

    I like how it looks with the front panel! ​
    [​IMG]

    Redid the acrylic plate that covers most of the cabling. I also flipped the radiator so that the holes were pointed upwards.​
    [​IMG]

    Made the acrylic sheet "L" shaped so that I can mount the pump on it. I was basically eyeballing a lot of measurements. Formerly, the pump was towards the opening of the case. This way it's as far back as possible. ​
    [​IMG]

    As you can see the rear end of the GPU is covers the Laing D5 completely. This is important because... I'm not satisfied with just a T-line for providing water. ​
    [​IMG]

    Here's the T-line as it was in the previous post. I would eventually replace this with a 90 degree angle fitting. I like how the braided cables part to accommodate the fittings on top of the pump. ​
    [​IMG]

    Yes! I've managed to fit the Bitspower Multi-Z 150 Reservoir into the build! all 170mms of total length + 30mm of angle fittings underneath + 15mm of fittings on top to accommodate a fillport! ​
    [​IMG]

    Only 1-2mms of clearance between the fan grill [Radiator] and the 90 degree angle fittings [Reservoir]. That was close!!!!
    [​IMG]

    This area is very busy to the eye. Tubes going into the radiator, reservoir, in-and-out of the Koolance RAM33 modules. ​
    [​IMG]

    At the back of the case you can see that I used some scrap acrylic to make another midplate. I'm not giving up on that idea! By flipping the radiator over, I've had to put away the previous midplate. ​
    [​IMG]

    How Oceanus looks with the temporary midplate... I'm liking everything else but that midplate. -.-​
    [​IMG]

    1. I've flipped the radiator back to before [holes facing down] and bought a few more 90 degree angle fittings.
    2. I've thrown out the new midplate and put in the old one.
    3. The reservoir fit too perfectly that I'm still stunned at how close the measurements were.
    4. Everything is pieced together and completed a 24 hour leak test. Side panels were mounted as well.
    5. Added a DVD RW to the drivebays and an extra hard drive [on brackets]

    It all looks pretty neat except for the leatherette finish peeling at certain places. I've decided to leave the faulty finish as is. I'll add it to the list of things to do for Phase 2. ​


    Chapter 10 - Epilogue
    Throwing up some photos of the completed rig. My fingers are soooo cramped from cramming everything inside and all those compression fittings.
    That's it. This build is done until i have the time to do Phase 2. Thank you so much for the privilege of sharing my build log here!
    Video Link Here

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: 14 Feb 2012
  4. bulldogjeff

    bulldogjeff The modding head is firmly back on.

    Joined:
    2 Mar 2010
    Posts:
    8,403
    Likes Received:
    634
    Very tight and very neat..nice work dude.:thumb:
     
  5. Sutura

    Sutura Member

    Joined:
    23 May 2011
    Posts:
    65
    Likes Received:
    1
    Congratz on the rig. Can you post some temperatures with Hwinfo32 or whatever application are you using>? I am just curious to see how this performs on the cooling side :D
     
  6. Cheapskate

    Cheapskate Insane? or just stupid?

    Joined:
    13 May 2007
    Posts:
    10,721
    Likes Received:
    810
    Epic self-torture!:D I understand your hand pain and respect you for not making compromises.
     
  7. Grym

    Grym New Member

    Joined:
    21 Nov 2011
    Posts:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Replies & Explanation

    The pleasure was all mine, Mr. Cheapskate. I am very much in awe of your ingenuity and creativity. A lot of your work [and in the Modmen show] taught me to make distinct choices in a build and sticking to them.​


    Thank you so much, Bulldogjeff! Your PSU cover for your Heatwave was one of your creative ideas that I drew upon for my midplate! It just makes everything so tidy at the bottom. And we do love tidy bottoms, don't we! :D


    Thank you, Sutura! Sadly I won't be able to accommodate your request for a screenshot. Phase 2 started fast and in a bad way. Allow me to explain:

    Phase 2 started when someone was asking to trade for my HD6950 2GB. He was offering us his GTX460 and EK-FC460 waterblock. Personally, I wanted the GTX460 because it was an Nvidia video card. The CUDA cores are very helpful with my learning new skills.

    I agreed to the trade because he added a whole bunch of EK 3/8" 1/2" Compression Fittings [Around 12 pieces].

    After the physical trade, I went home to find out that the GTX460 was suffering from artifacts on the screen as soon as the BIOS pops up. This being the first time for me to encounter an error of this sort, I spent a day and a half tearing through my system and reinstalling everything before I reached the conclusion that the video card was a lemon. :eeek:

    When I explained the situation to the person who initiated the trade, he lamented that the HD6950 I traded to him suffered a mishap when his daughter dropped it to the floor accidentally. While I do understand that the likelihood of that happening is very small, I am cursed to always look for the best in people.

    I pretty much chalked it as a lesson taught by experience and moved on rather than harangue him for a return of items. The thing that breaks my heart is that the HD6950 was still covered by a full warranty clause while the GTX460 had none. :waah:

    As for the temperatures
    Ambient: 24-27C
    CPU idle : 36-38C [NZXT Sentry Mix set to lowest]
    GPU idle : 39-40C [NZXT Sentry Mix set to lowest]
    CPU load : 45-52C [NZXT Sentry Mix set to highest; screaming Everflows]
    GPU load : 49-55C [NZXT Sentry Mix set to highest; screaming Everflows]

    Currently, I'm running off my GT210 [Backup video card] until the month ends. I've also swapped out a lot of the bigger compression fittings thus beginning Phase 2.

    When the next month begins I can either look for another 2nd hand GTX460 so that the waterblock is not wasted. Or, I can look for a GTX 560 Ti and then see if I can get my hands on a waterblock for that in my country.

    Again, my apologies, Sutura. :(
     
  8. Gentleman_Dingo

    Gentleman_Dingo New Member

    Joined:
    30 Aug 2007
    Posts:
    444
    Likes Received:
    18
    I love the work AND Gaunt's Ghosts. This is win/win for me.
     
  9. Guest-16

    Guest-16 Guest

    Lovely work and natural modding is great to see :D
     
  10. Sarakon

    Sarakon The German

    Joined:
    11 Feb 2011
    Posts:
    824
    Likes Received:
    28
    Awesome little mod...very original...and good use of the carbon film :D
     
  11. Sutura

    Sutura Member

    Joined:
    23 May 2011
    Posts:
    65
    Likes Received:
    1
    WOW, Grim that's quite an "adventure" you have gone through. I haven't hoped for such a detailed answer. :). I know GT210. It's in my parents computer now. I had a similar experience but a loooong time ago. I bought a second-hand GF440 128mb from a guy. 15min after the trade off I saw the cooler wasn't rotating. But the guy never picked his phone up. Later on in thorough examination it turned out that the card had far more serious problems than the simple cooler. Anyway. Mod on, to the next phase :)
     
  12. peteski

    peteski long live the pc

    Joined:
    8 Jun 2011
    Posts:
    384
    Likes Received:
    8
    nice smart build mate :rock: :rock: :rock:
     
  13. Grym

    Grym New Member

    Joined:
    21 Nov 2011
    Posts:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm glad you liked it! And yeah, did you ever volunteer your name for Dan Abnett to kill? People have been doing it on his facebook page. There's no guarantee that he'll use it, but it's worth the try! [I threw my name up there last year! :p]​

    Thank you so much, Bindibadgi! your kind praise is deeply appreciated. ^_^​

    Thank you for noting the "littleness" of the build. I love a good challenge and having to cram everything in a small package is something I would love to do again. The carbon film was a great way to keep things black internally. It's also great at hiding blemishes. I'm not even sure, till today, if i want to keep it black inside. My girlfriend recommended a white and chrome interior and I am quite open to the idea of it.

    Phase 2 of this build has a lot to do with how it looks. That means redoing the finish of the exterior. I didn't highlight it too much because it's such a strain on the eyes. I was hoping that March 2012 would be the month when I would clean it up but sadly, my need for a video card takes precedence.:(

    in light of our joint pains with broken deals, I propose a level 5 bro-hug. Bro-Hugged

    Thank you, peteski!​
     

Share This Page