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Motherboards Opinions on Asrock

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Woodstock, 7 Sep 2013.

  1. Woodstock

    Woodstock So Say We All

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    Hey,

    Looking to build a new pc, main uses will be gaming, programming (from Linux). I do a lot of work with virtulisation, so im after a motherboard that runs Haswell and VT-d (IOMMU and various extra passthrou options), which if im looking the spec sheats right, I need a motherboard that has the Q87 chipset. Two problems im struggling to find good reviews, and I can only find two models for sale in NZ, so short of buying from overseas options are limited to either the Intel DQ87PG or ASRock Q87M vPro.

    On paper the ASRock looks quite a bit better, but I have never used ASRock myself or know of any friends who have in the past, is there quality any good?

    Overclocking is not a concern, I don't intend to do any.
     
  2. Woodstock

    Woodstock So Say We All

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    In the past I have mainly used Gigabyte and Asus, I am a normally a fan of when all else is equal, returning to brands that have given me few issues, hence my slight caution at going with a company I don't know at all
     
  3. Burnout21

    Burnout21 Is the daddy!

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    There was a time and place when Asrock boards were nothing but cheap sh*t. However they've really turned things around in the last 4-5 years (has it really been that long...).

    Personally I just stick to gigabyte boards, they seem completely bulletproof, but it's much to do with pure luck than anything else, and my luck with Asus boards sucked, 6 DOA's, and 2 dead with in 6 and 8 months respectively. Across multiple platforms, and from different retailers.
     
  4. Darkwisdom

    Darkwisdom Level 99 Retro Nerd

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    Yeah, Asrock have really gone up in the world. Some of their enthusiast OC really well. I'm quite fond of their Mini-itx boards; they have great features and don't cost an arm and a leg.

    I'm the other way, i always stick to ASUS as i've never had a problem. I don't mind using other companies; but I always seem to go back to ASUS.
     
  5. faugusztin

    faugusztin I *am* the guy with two left hands

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    VT-d was once, in Sandy Bridge era a speciality of Q67 and C20x chipsets, plus some random ASRock boards (my Z68-ITX had it too). In Ivy Bridge era, this line became blury and many boards have it, for example even my Gigabyte B75N board i bought yesterday (at least the option is there in the UEFI).

    So technically it is down to - do you want VT-d on the officially Intel sanctioned boards, then get Q87 or one of the server chipsets for Xeons (C22x or whatever will be their name). If you want to pay less, then you should look around for boards from others than ASUS and check the manuals and reviews if there is the VT-d option. Why non-ASUS boards ? Well because i have yet to see an ASUS board with VT-d on other chipsets than Qxx or Cxxx :).
     
  6. Kovoet

    Kovoet What's a Dremel?

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    I used one as a stepping stone a while back as they were just cheap boards at one stage. But over the last 3 years they have improved massively. But me I'm an ASUS man through and through and have never had a problem with them
     
  7. Ljs

    Ljs Modder

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    ASRock are good quality products, I would pick them over an ASUS alternative anyday.

    *runs for the hills before he gets covered in fanboy saliva*
     
  8. Cerberus90

    Cerberus90 Car Spannerer

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    Aren't AsRock a sort of subsidiary of ASUS? I'm sure I read that on here at some point, whether it's true or not I'm not sure.


    I've had Gigabyte boards back in Socket 754 days, my Asus P5K premium is still going strong 5 years on, I had one AsRock board which I thought was causing problems but it may have been the CPU, and I've built a few systems with MSI boards that haven't had any problems.

    Basically, I think you pay your moneys and take your choice.
     
  9. PocketDemon

    PocketDemon What's a Dremel?

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    Whilst not an opinion about ASRock, ttbomk you can also look at the C226 chipset for both Haswell & proper vt-d support...

    So, for example, if you wanted to go Asus, there's the P9D series... ...& there's various Supermicro boards, who are renown for making solid products for workstation & server use, plus ASRock & others... Don't think there are any Gigabyte ones though.


    Yeah, i can't really give an informed opinion on current ASRock. Well, back when they were a direct subsidiary of Asus then they were certainly cheap tat - i know my father had a machine with one in for a while & it was awful - but the ownership changed 3 years or so ago & they've been getting better & better reviews, so...???

    As with many people though, i buy the same brand over & over again with mobos as it's about having trust in what's being bought for, normally, £200-300(+) a piece - the one time, since the early-mid 90s when it was largely a free for all on no name brands, when i bought something from another major brand for personal use then had nothing but problems with the board.
     
  10. faugusztin

    faugusztin I *am* the guy with two left hands

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    Originally yes, but they got completely separate few years ago, when Pegatron got separate from ASUS.
     
  11. AlienwareAndy

    AlienwareAndy What's a Dremel?

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    I've been using Asrock on and off for years and I've loved every product of theirs I've had.

    I used a ALiveXfire board (AM2+) for nearly two years with my Phenom 2 940 and they were £35. Full X8 X8 Crossfire support.

    I used a 478 board for my Celeron D and it was also good, and now I have the 990FX Extreme3. It's a great board the only thing I can really complain about is the 4+1 power stages which limit my overclocks. However, it was £78 delivered so I can't complain too much. It got my 8320 to 4.2ghz which is more than enough for my day to day use.

    Their support though IMO is legendary. I have been talking with a lady who works there for years now and they've always treated me well. For example, when I bought the Extreme3 they offered to send me a bios chip if the board wasn't 8 core ready.

    So overall? yeah, definitely a great company IMO.
     
  12. mrbungle

    mrbungle Undercooked chicken giver

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    Asrock make some ok stuff.

    Also make a fair bit of stuff which looks ok but when you look into the build of it such as the power phases etc they aren't quite the bargain you would may think.

    Edit Andys post above underlines this, the board looks great but has budget power phases with the name "extreme". For some reason that erks me somewhat.
     
  13. Elton

    Elton Officially a Whisky Nerd

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    They're thoroughly rather nice. Some of their products end up on the garish or cheesy side, but they've really gone up in quality since the LGA1155 days.

    I'm still using the P67 Extreme4. Don't expect them to have the most updated of drivers, but their motherboards are generally still pretty great.

    Their support is still miles better than Asus for sure.
     
  14. Neogumbercules

    Neogumbercules What's a Dremel?

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    I've used 2 asrock boards recently. A z68 gen3 and the A75 M-ITX. The Z68 had faulty legacy PCI slots and the A75 seems to have faulty USB3 ports. I might just be unlucky but that's been my experience. Overall the boards seemed OK but I'd rather spend the few extra bucks for a gigabyte or asus board. I have a Sabertooth Z77 now and it's flawless.
     
  15. Elton

    Elton Officially a Whisky Nerd

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    Asus' support was awful enough to convince me otherwise.

    I would buy gigabyte boards though, they're wonderful wonderful things. The AsRock boards tend to be solid but then sometimes get weird issues. For example, my Extreme4 for some reason runs the top PCI-E slot at 2.0x4 instead of x8..
     
  16. Neogumbercules

    Neogumbercules What's a Dremel?

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    Asrock support is pretty good. I had to get a new biis chip for the Z68 and I was promptly put in touch with a knowledgeable person who knew exactly what I needed. A new bios chip was mailed out immediately and it worked great.
     
  17. TheGreatSatan

    TheGreatSatan Member for 17 years!

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    I like Asrock boards and have used 3 of them, even really low end ones, and they're fine. My go to board is Gigabyte though
     
  18. Woodstock

    Woodstock So Say We All

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    With the power phase limitations mentioned above, are they an issue on a system running at stock speeds? I have no intention to overclock it
     
  19. Neogumbercules

    Neogumbercules What's a Dremel?

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    There's no issue running at stock speeds, should be fine.

    This discussion got me interested in trying to get the USB3 ports to work on my A75. Turns out no matter how many times I tried to install the all in one AMD drivers it wouldn't work unless I did a "custom" install, selected only the USB3 drivers, and install that way. Lo and behold, it worked that time, so I retract my statement about faulty USB ports.

    Their BIOS fan control options still suck though :D
     
  20. imersa

    imersa Parvum Princess

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    Used a small haswell board in project ITX. Great board no problems.
     

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