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Photos Photo Essay - Peru (Image Heavy)

Discussion in 'Photography, Art & Design' started by Ligoman17, 21 Feb 2011.

  1. Ligoman17

    Ligoman17 New Member

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    Greetings,

    I recently returned from an amazing vacation to Peru and I wanted to share some of my favorite photos taken during the trip. My GF and I started in the capital city of Lima, made our way up to the mountains to visit Cusco and Machu Picchu, toured villages and Inca ruins in the Altiplano, then spent a few days relaxing in the town of Puno on Lake Titicaca. The Altiplano and Lake Titicaca presented endless opportunities for landscape and portrait photography, and the majority of the pictures below are from these two locations. Before I move on to those pictures though, I'll quickly summarize my background and equipment list.

    I have been interested in photography for about 18 months now, with the goal of eventually becoming a competent Travel Photographer. In this set I've tried to capture the "feel" of the various regions of Peru, and though I know I fell short (the set definitely lacks cohesion in my mind), I learned many valuable lessons that I'll take with me on my next journey. On to the gear...

    Canon EOS 5D Mark II - Main/Only body (no backup)
    Canon EF 17-40mm f4 - Ultra wide zoom for landscapes
    Canon EF 24-105mm f4 - Wide to telephoto zoom, "walkaround" lens
    Canon EF 85mm f1.8 - Prime lens for portraits
    Canon Battery Charger - Stolen by baggage handlers at San Francisco airport
    Extra Battery - Same fate as charger

    Random Notes on Gear:
    The 17-40 never left my bag. All my landscape shots were done with the 24-105 at either 24mm or stitched from multiple shots. At a few locations I wished for my 70-200 f4. The 85mm prime was purchased just before the trip and the learning curve was high. I definitely "missed" a lot of portrait shots below f2.0. Must learn to tame autofocus... Finally, don't ever check your spare battery and charger with your luggage, unless you want to cram your entire vacation into a single charge. Thankfully the 5D has amazing battery life!

    Below, in no particular order, are my 10 favorite shots from the trip. Your thoughtful feedback is greatly appreciated. Enjoy! :thumb:

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    Detail, Machu Piccu by Ligoman17, on Flickr

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    Elderly Woman in Traditional Dress, Peru by Ligoman17, on Flickr

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    Rolling Hills and Mountains in Fog, Peruvian Altiplano by Ligoman17, on Flickr

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    Farm Boy with Sheep, Peruvian Altiplano by Ligoman17, on Flickr

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    Farm Girl and Llama at Market, Peruvian Altiplano by Ligoman17, on Flickr

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    Train and Mountains, Peruvian Altiplano by Ligoman17, on Flickr

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    Rolling Hills, Peruvian Altiplano by Ligoman17, on Flickr

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    Woman in Traditional Dress, Peru by Ligoman17, on Flickr

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    Dog on Cathedral Steps, Peru by Ligoman17, on Flickr

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    Puno and Lake Titicaca at Dawn by Ligoman17, on Flickr
     
    Cthippo and stonedsurd like this.
  2. Guest-16

    Guest-16 Guest

    <3

    I want to go to Peru.

    Thank you for sharing these fantastic shots!
     
  3. supermonkey

    supermonkey Deal with it

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    The photo of the elderly woman and the photo of the farm boy with the sheep are ace. Both photos are very good on a technical level, but they also work very well on an emotional level.

    To offer a bit of critique, I think the photo of the boy with the sheep could have had a bit more depth of field to bring the sheep's wool into focus, and I wish you had zoomed out just enough to get his hands in the frame. However, those are minor details that don't necessarily take away from an otherwise winning photograph.

    I wish you had captured more of Machu Picchu, especially the surrounding landscape. The surrounding area is one of the things that defines the location. You photo, while not bad at all, is at just the right focal length that is neither wide enough nor tight enough.

    Thanks for sharing the set! Looks like it was a great trip, and you got some wonderful images while you were there.
     
  4. stonedsurd

    stonedsurd Is a cackling Yuletide Belgian

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    Awesome. Envy/gratitude in this post.
     
  5. Threefiguremini

    Threefiguremini New Member

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    Amazing thanks for sharing ;). The first shot is particularly striking. For some reason it doesn't look real to me. Sort of looks like a painting or computer graphics to me which is cool.
     
  6. memeroot

    memeroot aged and experianced

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    great shots!

    wonderful country
     
  7. Cthippo

    Cthippo Can't mod my way out of a paper bag

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    Awesome pics, thanks for sharing and have some rep! :thumb:
     
  8. Ligoman17

    Ligoman17 New Member

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    Thank you all for the very positive feedback. Peru truly is an amazing country, and if anyone has plans to go there I'd be more than happy to share the good and the bad from my experiences.

    Supermonkey - I really appreciate your critique. My challenge to myself in shooting Machu Picchu was to find something striking, unique and different from the usual touristy photos. I decided to isolate the lower right corner of the "money shot" (the classic composition facing Huayna Picchu). I think the vertical-ness along with the shear granite cliff in the background gives enough impression that you're in a severe mountain environment, but in the end I probably agree with you that a wider or tighter crop would improve the composition. The tree and grass in the lower left corner don't add much, and I think the focus is better kept on the architecture anyway. As a fairly inexperienced photographer, I often find myself later cropping photos that appeared in the field to be strong compositions. I'm an engineer by training and don't have much of an artistic inclination, but I hope to gain that eye for composition with time...

    The shot of the elderly woman is also one of my favorites among favorites. I'll never forget her mannerism, after asking in broken spanish if we could take her picture - she gave us a slight nod, adjusted her blouse ever so much, then sat up straight and stared right into the camera. It was so dignified and humbling. I'll never forget that encounter.
     
    Last edited: 24 Feb 2011

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