1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Other Plumbing Advice

Discussion in 'General' started by Hitman, 5 Nov 2018.

  1. Hitman

    Hitman Minimodder

    Joined:
    18 Oct 2002
    Posts:
    1,698
    Likes Received:
    29
    Some pictures for reference - https://imgur.com/a/n3ThLIL

    I've been trying to work out why we have terrible water pressure from our shower. This is on the first floor of our house and is the only shower in the property.

    We have a three story house, with a bedroom in the loft space. There is an airing cupboard in this room which contains a hot water tank. In the small loft space left above this room sits a water tank and a F&E tank for the central heating.

    At the top of the hot water tank is what appears to be a surrey valve. The bottom outlet of the surrey valve has a straight pipe which eventually curves up and out of the ceiling of the airing cupboard (with an isolating valve with blue handle just before it leaves the cupboard). The top outlet of the surrey valve has a straight pipe which then comes to a T junction, from the top of the T junction a pipe goes up and out of the ceiling of the airing cupboard. From the bottom of the T junction a pipe runs down and into the floor (with an isolation valve with a red handle halfway along it).

    I'm assuming that the top outlet of the surrey valve is supplying the hot water to all the taps in the house and at the T junction the pipe running up is the vent pipe up to the water tank in the loft, and then down to the taps. Which I guess means the bottom outlet of the surrey valve is feeding our shower.

    Tonight when I get home I'm going to try turning off each isolation valve and see what happens with the taps and shower.

    So coming finally to my question for any good DIY'ers or plumbers - Is it usual for a surrey valve to be installed if there is NO shower pump installed? From my research a surrey valve is only installed when you need to feed a shower pump, but we have NO shower pumps installed :oldconfused:

    If the bottom outlet of the surrey valve is supplying our shower, could I add a pump to this pipe to fix the pressure issue?
     
    Last edited: 5 Nov 2018
  2. Corky42

    Corky42 Where's walle?

    Joined:
    30 Oct 2012
    Posts:
    9,648
    Likes Received:
    388
    Seeing as there's not been an answer yet I'll give it stab from defiantly not a plumber but DIY point of view. The lower of the two pipes coming from the top of the tank should be the surrey flange take-off and normally they'd only be used to feed a shower pump so at a guess maybe there used to be a shower pump on that line?

    If you take the cladding off that pipe has it had a section soldered in?
     
  3. Hitman

    Hitman Minimodder

    Joined:
    18 Oct 2002
    Posts:
    1,698
    Likes Received:
    29
    Thanks for chipping in and sorry my pictures aren't great, it's a bit of a tight space.

    The pipe in the picture with the cladding is coming from the top outlet of the Surrey flang (this is the one with the T in it). The pipe coming from the bottom of the Surrey flange doesn't have any cladding on it, and I can see along the whole length it's not been cut.

    I've been reading and watching YouTube all day trying to work it out and apparently you can run off a Surrey flange like this to a shower without a pump, but it's odd to not add a pump as the pressure is terrible. I guess the previous owners didn't really care and wanted to save money? :oldconfused:

    Has anyone tried a Shower Power Booster - https://www.showerpowerbooster.co.uk?

    I'm wondering if it cut the pipe from the bottom of the flange after the isolation valve and stick it in there.
     
  4. jon4tron

    jon4tron Administrator Administrator

    Joined:
    25 Feb 2014
    Posts:
    48
    Likes Received:
    3
    Assuming you've got about 1m of head pressure, the vertical difference between your hot and cold tanks. I've got the same - but 22mm pipe to the bath from the tanks, and a good fat shower hose, so although the pressure is very low, the flow rate isn't too bad.
    It does sound like you should just get a plumber in to fit a shower pump
     
  5. Hitman

    Hitman Minimodder

    Joined:
    18 Oct 2002
    Posts:
    1,698
    Likes Received:
    29
    I managed to get this sorted, the issue was actually due to blocked filters in the mixer shower bar. I turned off the cold and hot feeds to the shower and unscrewed the mixer bar from the wall. In each inlet is a mesh filter, both of which were almost completely blocked by gunk and what I assume was lime scale. After a good clean of the mesh filters and the unit itself we are back to a 'good enough' shower and a happy gf. Many thanks for the input guys :thumb:
     
    Arboreal, Corky42 and liratheal like this.
  6. ferret141

    ferret141 Minimodder

    Joined:
    18 Oct 2010
    Posts:
    1,314
    Likes Received:
    40
    What does your shower bar look like?
     
  7. Hitman

    Hitman Minimodder

    Joined:
    18 Oct 2002
    Posts:
    1,698
    Likes Received:
    29

Share This Page