1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Point of View and Tagan co-operate in high-end stream

Discussion in 'Industry News' started by Tim S, 7 Feb 2007.

  1. Tim S

    Tim S OG

    Joined:
    8 Nov 2001
    Posts:
    18,881
    Likes Received:
    78
    Eindhoven, The Netherlands – 07 February, 2007. – POINT OF VIEW, well known for its range of nVidia based Graphics cards and IT products and Tagan, the widely known manufacturer of world renowned Power Supply Units, starts a co-operation together.

    The manufacturer of NVIDIA based Graphics Cards and computer peripherals Point of View enters the IT market together with Tagan and therefore generates a completely new and exciting partnership to be reckoned with for 2007.

    Point of View, established in the year 2000, started communication with Tagan in November 2006 and now has teamed up on a dual partnership to be called Point of View/Tagan. These Power Supplies will be available in retails stores across Europe in February 2007.

    This is an exciting further development and personal achievement for Tagan as fellow manufacturers are convinced that Tagan technology is the way forward in the high-end market today and for the future.

    According to NVIDIA, Tagan`s SLI ready technology has proven to be the best unit to run high-end systems which include the G80 hardware. Optimal and efficient performance is essential to the gaming world and Tagan have the finger on the pulse when it comes to such required technogy. Both Point of View and Tagan strives to meet the ultimate technological requirements and therefore, such a partnership is the best solution for those who need the best.

    The first available model of this cooperation will be the Point of View / Tagan 650 Watt Power supply. The Dual Transformer Technology (DTT) assures fantastic performance stability and is equipped with State of the Art 6 pin PCU-e cables with special (EMI) sleeving on all connectors.
    With an 80% performance ratio, the Dual Engine belongs to the elite choice for ultimate gaming systems.

    This is just the start, in the coming months more power supplies with the brand Point of View / Tagan will hit the market.

    These power supplies will be available at your local Point of View Distributor / retailer across Europe.

    About TAGAN:
    Tagan provides core technology, designed and manufactured for excellence.
    For more information about Tagan, please visit these web sites:"
    www.Tagan.com www.Tagan.de www.nanopoint.co.uk www.nanopoint.fr or www.maxpoint.de

    About Point of View :
    Point of View, established in the year 2000, has quite simply been a success story. Since its inception, the sales of Point of View graphics cards have grown exponentially and our brand can now be seen in more than 40 countries. We are based in Holland with a European, multi-lingual sales team. However, our company includes Point of View Taiwan, Point of View China, Point of View Hong Kong, Point of View France and Point of View Miami. Point. For more information about Point of View Graphics, visit the company’s website: www.pointofview-online.com.
     
  2. DougEdey

    DougEdey I pwn all your storage

    Joined:
    5 Jul 2005
    Posts:
    13,933
    Likes Received:
    33
    If only they could make graphics cards 80% efficient
     
  3. mclean007

    mclean007 Officious Bystander

    Joined:
    22 May 2003
    Posts:
    2,035
    Likes Received:
    15
    On what metric? They already are (more or less) 100% efficient at turning power into heat - a card (or CPU etc) chewing 100W of power will pump out 100W of heat.

    You can give % values for the efficiency of PSUs, by looking at the power going in one end vs the power coming out the other, because the unit of measurement (the watt) is the same. The input power of a GPU is measured in watts, but its output power might be measured in terms of triangles/sec or pixels/sec. This is why the move towards talking about performance per watt - a GPU that uses 60W to pump out 60fps in game X at res Y with whatever graphical goodies turned on is more efficient than one that uses 150W to do the same. You can't just slap a percentage figure on it, though.
     
  4. DougEdey

    DougEdey I pwn all your storage

    Joined:
    5 Jul 2005
    Posts:
    13,933
    Likes Received:
    33
    If a card produce 90C temperatures then thats a lot of energy being converted to heat. Heat isn't useful energy in this case so it's waste.
     
  5. mclean007

    mclean007 Officious Bystander

    Joined:
    22 May 2003
    Posts:
    2,035
    Likes Received:
    15
    But the temperature is purely a function of the power use and the cooling. An item like a CPU or a GPU effectively turns ALL the power it draws into heat (apart from a very small amount required to drive the outputs). Where else could it go?

    In order to bring temps down, you either need to improve cooling or reduce power draw. There is no way to convert the energy into anything other than heat.
     
  6. DougEdey

    DougEdey I pwn all your storage

    Joined:
    5 Jul 2005
    Posts:
    13,933
    Likes Received:
    33
    But it's wasted energy! That's heating up metal a 100% efficient car wouldn't need a radiator. Same thing with a graphics card.

    Considering CPUs now run at 35W with the same power as a 65W or even 95W processor, I stand by my point.
     
  7. mclean007

    mclean007 Officious Bystander

    Joined:
    22 May 2003
    Posts:
    2,035
    Likes Received:
    15
    Yeah but (effectively) ALL the power going into a GPU is 'wasted' in that it all comes back out as heat. In a car engine, you can measure its 'efficiency' based on how much mechanical power it develops over the rate of consumption of chemical energy. The unit is the same (watts). The useful output of a GPU (unlike, say, a car engine, a pump, a lightbulb, or a PSU) is generally not measured in watts (or something readily reduced to watts), so the concept of pure 'efficiency' in a GPU is nonsensical, until we get towards the theoretical maximum processing capability per unit energy consumed (as a consequence of the second law of thermodynamics - entropy can never decrease), which is a LONG way away.

    As I said before, in contrast to a PSU, which at 80% efficiency would waste 20W for every 100W consumed and 80W of useful power produced, a GPU essentially converts all of its input energy to heat. There are only two logical ways of measuring its energy efficiency:

    (1) If you disregard performance, look at the raw energy consumption. This might be the metric used in, say, a server farm situation, where a small saving in the power consumption of each server can result in a big change to the bottom line. Someone speccing out a server would likely go for the least power-hungry gfx card (if one were used at all - many servers are 'headless' and can be fully remotely administered), because graphical performance is pretty irrelevant.

    (2) Look at the ratio of performance to energy usage (analogous to Intel's much vaunted 'performance per watt' metric) - this is where most enthusiasts should be looking. By this metric, a GPU that pushes more pixels while using the same or less electrical power is more efficient.

    Neither of these can be reduced to a percentage figure, so I stand by my point! :D
     

Share This Page