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Case Mod - Complete ⭐ Project: I.S.A.C - Thermaltake 2020 Case Mod Challenge

Discussion in 'Project Logs' started by The_Crapman, 29 Mar 2020.

  1. Cheapskate

    Cheapskate Insane? or just stupid?

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    Google 'dremel 4000 (or whatever) parts'. 99% of Dremel failures are the switches.
    The gpu cover is fantastic. The big circle helps the water block and fan hole blend in. I'd leave the bumpy bit. You could cheat and add a strip of black plastic across the edge to cover it.
    Edit: :lol: Adding decorations that are 10 times sturdier than the case.
     
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  2. The_Crapman

    The_Crapman Don't phone it's just for fun.

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    I had considered putting alu angled down it, but I was already thinking of adding small piece of alu angle to the corners and making that a sort of 'theme' through the build on other parts.

    I've already got a new one. Had a base model at the local hardware store I could afford. If I had the money I'd have got a proper pendant Bobbie (and an angle grinder for cutting fun), but money is really tight and I needed it asap.
     
  3. Jean R built

    Jean R built Active Member

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    You could technically fill the gap with welding and then grind it.
    As for the battle scars sometimes it's not worth it to remove them unless they are really bad looking, you could end up having to thin the metal a lot.
    The project looks good :dremel:
     
  4. The_Crapman

    The_Crapman Don't phone it's just for fun.

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    Thanks :happy: Thats a good shout on the welding, might have a go with the soldering iron, see if I can bridge it :thumb:
     
  5. Defyant Mods

    Defyant Mods Well-Known Member

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    Leave em ! it's what makes it and you a true artisan work :thumb: That GPU cover is one of the coolest original mods ive seen in a while :rock::rock:
     
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  6. adidan

    adidan Guesswork is still work

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    Dude. Looking frickin awesome.
     
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  7. kim

    kim hardware addict

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    You're kidding:jawdrop:, that GPU shroud is a masterpiece, your accuracy with metal is outstanding :wallbash:
     
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  8. 4LIEN

    4LIEN Active Member

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    I really like your work with metal sheet! Very clean results!
     
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  9. The_Crapman

    The_Crapman Don't phone it's just for fun.

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    I'm not sure about artisan, but thank you :blush: Other than filling the corner gap, be it with fake welding using solder or with a piece of alu angle, the rest is pretty much safe. lol

    Thanks mate. Was so happy how it looked when I put it together I did a fist-clench and almost caused an injury :hehe:

    Thanks :grin: I think they key is patience (which given my usual temperament is even a surprise to me :winking:) and going slowly.

    Thanks :thumb:
     
  10. adidan

    adidan Guesswork is still work

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    [​IMG]
     
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  11. The_Crapman

    The_Crapman Don't phone it's just for fun.

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    Ahoy hoy techerinos!

    Time for an update already?
    [​IMG]

    Yes Ralph, in the first attempt at mini updates (that may or may not be mini in size - sorry Doge), yesterday’s work seemed as good a point as any to pop in some progress.

    The original plan was to measure and drill out all the pass-through holes before bending, but having seen from the GPU shroud how much difficulty a hole added to bending I thought it best to get that done first. So first up was scoring a bend line in, which was really hard work in the "mild" steel. I was almost tempted to get the Dremel out, but the chances of cutting right through would be too high. After a few little sessions I got what I thought would be deep enough, it's only 0.9mm thick after all.
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    Dodgy Bending Break Mark1. I have 1"x1" aluminium angle in the workmate jaws, quick-grip clamps holding 2 galvanised steel angle pieces onto the sheet as well as acting as arms to bend. It got a small bend in but the clamps quickly hit the surface of the workmate and it would go no further. :rollingeyes: This is why I had originally wanted a Black and Decker one where you could make one of the pieces vertical for clamping on top of the other. Would have made this so much easier.
    [​IMG]

    I also hadn't positioned the steel pieces very well and the bend hadn't formed on the score line properly, with the tray bending with it. To correct this, I clamped the 2 steel angles to it, making sure they were right on that line, then used a G clamp to force them together and straighten it out. Actually worked very well :thumb:
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    [​IMG]

    Dark clouds drew in and started emptying on the shed, so I had to close the doors to. This left it very dark inside so I had to come up with a lighting solution to get more of the shed lit up.
    [​IMG]

    Dodgy Bending Break Mark2. Sheet flat on the workmate, but the workmate bows in the middle so a flatter piece had to be put on top, steel angle over the edge to strengthen it. Then another steel angle over the top of the sheet with a piece of wood across to try and make the pressure more uniform. Then a piece of steel angle either side of the part to be bent up, secured with 2 grip clamps and the G clamp holding it in the middle. But the steel angle just isn't thick or strong enough and the sheet I'm bending start deforming where there's no clamping as soon as I start putting pressure on it. :duh:
    [​IMG]

    Dodgy Bending Break Mark 2.1.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    It surprisingly worked ok, but again the score line didn't really assist the bend much. You can see there's a decent amount taken out, so :oldconfused:
    [​IMG]

    Part 1 of 2
     
    Last edited: 9 Jul 2020
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  12. The_Crapman

    The_Crapman Don't phone it's just for fun.

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    Part 2 of 2

    Thankfully the old G clamp squeeze came to the rescue and flattened it out nicely.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I got the file back into the groove to take out a little more material, see if we couldn't get the bend to behave and then lay it down to contemplate my next move. And then it hit me :idea: use the jaws of the workmate to put the squeeze on it and get it bent that last bit.
    [​IMG]

    Dodgy Bending Break Mark 3. Aluminium angle on the jaws (I know it's softer than the steel but it has a nice sharp clean edge), sheet placed with groove on the edge of the alu, 2 steel angles and a wood beam clamped over the top. I slowly turned the screws and got it evened up and slightly tensioned, then began tightening them up properly.
    [​IMG]

    It went ok at first. When it started getting really tough, I’d have to do one handle at a time with both hands, it required the kind of strength I just don't have at the minute so took a while with having to break often. I'd tighten it as much as I could, then slack off a little, then tighten it back up, sometimes offering a little "encouragement" from the hammer on either the beam across the top or the sides of the workmate. Eventually it was pretty dam closed and just wouldn't budge.
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    The piece was really good and squished in the jaws, the top was a little rounded and not properly flush, so with a small piece of wood and the hammer I beat the edge into it as best I could.
    [​IMG]

    Ended up pretty decent :thumb:
    [​IMG]

    And fits nice and snug with room for the thick 360.
    [​IMG]

    Short(ish) and sweet today, but be sure to catch the next episode. Same Crap time, same Crap channel.
     
    Last edited: 9 Jul 2020
  13. Cheapskate

    Cheapskate Insane? or just stupid?

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    Wood block and hammer is the best way, But I guess you noticed. :D
    -But dang... doing that with a little tack hammer. Ow. The end result is great at least.
    Cat: "I heard you yelling, "GET BENT!" are you OK?"
     
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  14. Jean R built

    Jean R built Active Member

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    Good job, hammer is the way to go for the corners, unless you have a really big press :thumb:.
     
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  15. The_Crapman

    The_Crapman Don't phone it's just for fun.

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    I don't have anything in between that 20oz claw hammer and my 2kg (4.4lb) lump hammer and I'm not really in a state to be wielding that. That's how I got into the mess I'm in :hehe:

    I managed to get it there or thereabouts before resorting to the hammer, but it definitely helped get it sharper.
     
  16. Vault-Tec

    Vault-Tec Green Plastic Watering Can

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    As I said elsewhere that's some truly amazing work there dude. You actually inspired me today. I was having headset issues with my bike build (couldn't get the right pre load bolt) and all I had was some manky stainless bolt with letters on the end. I thought "Oh just go buy a allen bolt" but then found out it's some weird American size and I can't get any bolt for it. Not a problem ! I did a Crappy and filed it off, polished it and then fine line taped it and painted the top.

    [​IMG]

    I'd actually forgotten how amazing files are.
     
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  17. Vault-Tec

    Vault-Tec Green Plastic Watering Can

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    That's exactly why I have a B&D Firestorm. I have had it for ten years and it's still going. I had a Dremel way BITD but within a month the bolts on the body kept coming bloody loose and it rattled like a snake. I replaced it with a B&D FS in 2006, then got a 240v one when I got home. And I am still ripping with it (used it today !).
     
  18. The_Crapman

    The_Crapman Don't phone it's just for fun.

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    Nice. looks OEM mate :thumb:
     
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  19. The_Crapman

    The_Crapman Don't phone it's just for fun.

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    Ahoy hoy modderinos

    Back once again for the renegade master, wait, no, for another episode of Project ISAC.

    You know how I should the tray fit nice and snug? Yeh well a little 2 snug, it needed a few mm trimmed off the edge as well as a couple of notches put in for where to top rad hole has a lip. This took far longer than I thought, even with the rough cut file, it's likely down to me not having very good technique as I'd do a couple of strokes that would take a lot off, then apparently nothing would be removed for the next 5 mins :rollingeyes: Probably made harder by the difficulty in clamping it to something solidly.
    [​IMG]

    Also had to take a smidge out the corner to go over where the rad mount is fixed to then floor.
    [​IMG]

    With the tray now sitting properly flat I could get to work on planning, measuring and marking out where the pass-through holes for the water and main power cables. This took quite some time as things didn't quite line up as I'd previously thought, so the loop needed a re-think. What I'd previously been planning for the power cables got scuppered when covid dried up my supply and 'plan b' turned out to not be viable either. Rather than passing the cables through holes I'll be using aviator connectors, this will separate the front and back nicely though and their different styles/themes.
    [​IMG]

    Even once the overall layout and design was set, it took quite a while to get everything exactly right, particularly with the aviator connections as I'd have to make sure the thin hex nut that fixes them in place has room to turn, while also trying to get them as close together and lining up with the connections on the motherboard. As they're quite small and light they'd have a tendency to shoot off at the slightest nudge. In the end I had to stick them down with blu tack, but that made adjusting their positions harder. A lot of faff, but it was important to get these positions and measurements spot on.
    [​IMG]

    Ever seen a GPU backplate with a 6-pack? Well now you have :hehe: I had planned on getting into those lines with a wire brush wheel, but when I saw how awesome it looked after the initial pass with the abrasive wheel, I had to keep it.
    [​IMG]

    I punched and then drilled out all the holes with a 4mm bit to start off with. Once they were done, I took the tape off so it didn't interfere with the next steps and marked what size hole was needed next to them. I also put a cross through the motherboard mounting holes, just to make sure there wasn't a mix up, as that's exactly the kind of cock-up I'd make :worried: :hehe:
    [​IMG]

    Particularly for the 24pin holes, I wouldn't be able to get the drill in from the back of the sheet because it would bump into the bent-up section, so I had to do it from the front. Took an age to get a configuration that worked, trying different combinations of my odd bits of wood propping it up trying to get it to rest on top of the workmate, when all it took was hanging it over the edge and 1 piece on the rails. :rollingeyes:
    [​IMG]

    First I widened them all the just under half an inch with a step bit with lots of increments, which helped keep them all in check and in line. Then It was time for the big boy :naughty: I'd be taking it up to 5/8", so marked the 11/16 in red so I knew when to put the brakes on.
    [​IMG]

    Like a glove :thumb:
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    I was using cutting lubricant to stop the step bit trying to grab on and dig in too much, kept the swarf fairly neat for the clean-up.
    [​IMG]

    Part 1 of 2
     
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  20. The_Crapman

    The_Crapman Don't phone it's just for fun.

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    Part 2 of 2

    Pretty happy with the first set. The last hole has strayed off a little, but you can only really notice up close and once it's got the connectors and wires over them it won’t be noticeable. People probably wouldn't have noticed if I hadn't pointed it out :eyebrow:
    [​IMG]

    After drilling out the holes for PCI and EPS power, now it was time for the G1/4 pass-throughs, for which I'd bought this 20mm hole cutter specially.
    [​IMG]

    Get some interesting patterns of swarf in the saw after cutting. One looked like a christmas tree!
    [​IMG]

    After that I deburred and cleaned up and holes and then had to cut some out of the bottom of the case. Now I always where my safety specs, but I hadn't been wearing any other face protection while cutting and sanding most of the time and had seen some horrid sights while blowing my nose, so I'd been careful today and worn a mask. While cutting with my jigsaw something shot out, hit the face mask and ricocheted under the safety glasses and into the corner of my eye :eeek:

    Luckily, it was one of those moments where everything seems to slow down (like some sort of danger activated Max Payne-esque bullet time) and I'd seen whatever is was flying towards me and managed to get my eye shut in time. Still stung like a bugger though. I rushed off to the house and checked my eye for any damage or debris which there didn't seem to be. I thought my contact lens out and rinsed my eye with the contact lens cleaning drops I have. Seems I had very lucky escape, especially as it was the left one, which is my dominant eye.
    [​IMG]

    With my eye cleansed and calmed, I grabbed the goggles from my mayhems blitz kit and quickly finished off the cut and tidied it a little. My reaction to being struck in the eye had caused the cut to go a deeper than intended, but it shouldn't matter too much. I'd had just about enough and my nerves were still pretty shook as I hastily filed and sanded any rough edges from the case and called it a day. Really please how the holes came out, all bang on bar that one, which is really tricky with a hand drill and an aggressive chunky step bit, especially in such a tough material.
    [​IMG]

    Obviously there still some more to come out of the case for the PCI and EPS power cables, but that can wait till my hands stop shaking. :worried: That's all for now folks. Be sure to stay tuned for another episode of "What Andy maimed next" :hehe: Same Crap time, same Crap channel.
     

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