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Case Mod - In Progress Project Thief -Completed 11-2014 -2 CPUs,8 GPUs,4 Loops,6 Pumps,50 Fans,2TB SSD

Discussion in 'Project Logs' started by stren, 20 Dec 2011.

  1. Mizugetsu

    Mizugetsu New Member

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    i'm sorry to say this but i feel like i'm developing an irrational hatred of you STREN so much awesome TECHY goodness makes me want to punch you in the face because i have to wait before i can begin my project

    but in all serious-ness it's looking great and the little mini projects keep everything moving

    P.S I hate you
     
    Last edited: 17 Jun 2012
  2. stren

    stren New Member

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    Haha well I'm glad you're enjoying it even if it's in a love/hate way lol :) Here's another update:

    I also had ordered a crystalfontz setup so that I could monitor temps accurately, although the aquaero is more of a system, it doesn't support the dallas temp probes that can be calibrated to <0.1C accuracy. This setup should let me do that. The package arrived while I was away:

    [​IMG]

    More packaging:

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    Taking it out of the bag - it's the 635 module with the 4 line LCD:

    [​IMG]

    They'd pre fitted the SCAB module which enables the temp sensors to be hooked up:

    [​IMG]

    Not quite sure what was with the stray spray paint:

    [​IMG]

    Decided to mount it on the top of the test bench:

    [​IMG]

    However the right side couldn't be screwed down so I added some support so I could at least push the buttons if needed:

    [​IMG]

    The test bench came with extra extrusion pieces so you can add on extra devices, I decided to use my RD30 pump for the cpu block test:

    [​IMG]

    I'd also ordered a King Instruments flow meter (similar to the one Martin uses):

    [​IMG]

    It's more accurate and less restrictive than the impeller types. However it's large - here it is zip tied to the case next to the 400mm EK res:

    [​IMG]

    And now the final setup waiting for the 2nd R4E/3930K to arrive:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  3. stren

    stren New Member

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    Time for a belated update:

    I used the nice quick release thumb screws to remove the EX 560 radiator from the TX10. I used two extra pieces from the tech station to build a support beam for it:

    [​IMG]

    Then used some of the accessories to grip it either side so it was stable, but yet also quick to remove:

    [​IMG]

    Then the 2nd R4E board came in:

    [​IMG]

    And a 2nd cpu:

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    Installed the motherboard - I learned I should loosen the standoffs from the tray a little as they holes have enough movement that the standoffs may be mispositioned. After screwing everything in I want back and tightened it. Then added the cpu:

    [​IMG]

    Then some ram:

    [​IMG]

    Then removed the ram in order to fit the DT 5Noz using the Sniper thumbnuts:

    [​IMG]

    Then put the ram back in:

    [​IMG]

    Added a gpu (9800 gt is enough for the cpu test) and that's it for now!
     
  4. stren

    stren New Member

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    Photo update:

    [​IMG]

    Box was huge, almost as wide as a 560 rad! The dac/amp is large too, much bigger than it seemed from photos:

    [​IMG]

    Deep too:

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    Time to get the test bench up and running:

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    The flow meter needed some barbs, I got these 1/2" brass barbs from home depot:

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    I forgot that with no o-ring, you need teflon tape, that would bite me later. Clamped it down:

    [​IMG]

    Matching one for the bottom input port:

    [​IMG]

    Hooked up the Iwaki RD30 pump fed directly from the 400mm reservoir:

    [​IMG]

    I had the return come in the bottom and used the longest internal tube to direct the flow to the top of the res in order to help bleeding. Then connected the CPU:

    [​IMG]

    Hooked up the rad, and ran out of clear tube, had to use some of the leftover pink:

    [​IMG]

    Time to fill it up:

    [​IMG]

    2.55GPM while bleeding with the Iwaki at 19V, at 29V it was pushing a smidge over 3.5GPM:

    [​IMG]

    Ready to start overclocking:

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Nutman

    Nutman Never stuck with stock

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    LOVE that test bench!
     
  6. stren

    stren New Member

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    :):)

    Alright - while I haven't made progress on the project, I have made progress on the CPU water block review. Here's how I did the temperature sensors (some of these photos are repeats but are included for completeness as a how-to guide):

    For this I was following Rubidium's excellent guide with some modifications. His guide is a must read if you're planning to copy this.

    Dallas one wire temperature sensors are much more accurate than the standard 2 wire thermistor type sensors that are used in current water temperature probes. However they need to be water proofed and mounted in the loop which means some work on my part.

    So here's what I ordered - the temperature sensors and the crystalfontz USB interface- there are many options here, the one I chose was not the cheapest but gives a good amount of screen space:

    [​IMG]

    The package came in:

    [​IMG]

    In addition to the main screen display, you'll need a SCAB module that enables the sensor monitoring, plus a USB cable, plus the temperature sensors too.

    [​IMG]

    Here's the break down of how to plug it in

    [​IMG]

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    We also needed some other parts to build the temperature sensors into, the bitspower rotary q fitting is very flexible but has more ports than you'll probably need so you'll need to order some stop fittings or a different t adapter:

    [​IMG]

    Here's what I ordered from mcmaster-carr at the top and at the bottom is a sample order for enough parts for one temp sensor from sidewinder (I had some parts already so only ordered what I needed). If you clean the stainless steel syringe well you may be able to reuse it, I ordered two just in case. The parts arrived:

    [​IMG]

    I ordered the brass metal brush, I probably should have ordered something else though - maybe a steel one? Eitherway it seems to have worked for me. Brass barbs make life easier because otherwise you have to remove the nickel plating from the fitting.

    [​IMG]

    First off rough up the surface of the temperature sensor, I used 220 grit regular sand paper:

    [​IMG]

    Then rough up the interior surface of the barb using the metal brush (fit it in a drill and spend a few minutes doing the old in and out). I also sanded the end of the barb and it's chamfer with 220 grit. I then cut some small neoprene washers to fit around the temp sensors and hold it centered in the barb:

    [​IMG]

    I bought the smallest I could find from home depot. If you can find something that's a perfect fit (any rubber grommet or washer that fits would be fine) then it would be better. You want to make the fit as perfect as possible otherwise the glue will leak past and it could ruin all your efforts. Fit a 2nd washer to keep the wire centered at the back of the barb. Now we're going to mix up the glue. Get your glue mats together:

    [​IMG]

    I found about a quarter of the 1.7oz size would fill 2-3 3cc syringes. One 3cc syringe's worth is probably enough for 2 fittings. I mixed it in a disposable plastic shot glass that I had laying around.

    [​IMG]

    Then take the plastic syringe, dip the end in and start sucking up the glue:

    [​IMG]

    Stop when you have enough and wipe off the tip:

    [​IMG]

    Attach the needle by screwing it on while pushing it in. Be careful to catch the glue that comes out while you do this:

    [​IMG]

    Fill up around the temperature sensor slowly avoiding making any bubbles. You will want to fill up just above the edge of the fitting as the glue will shrink down a bit. As the glue will run you need to secure it so that it doesn't run out. I put mine loosely in a vice:

    [​IMG]

    Here they are after drying for 24 hours:

    [​IMG]

    You can see the glue is lower than the edge of the fitting. If your washer/grommet wasn't a good fit, a good amount of glue may have leaked past. If it's too low you can always top off later.

    [​IMG]

    Now you're going to remove the grommet/washer and fill the other side of the fitting all the way to the top. Again take it slowly and avoid bubbles, keep going around and around the wires and try and keep the wires centered. Leave to dry in an upright position so that it doesn't run out the side:

    [​IMG]

    All done:

    [​IMG]

    You can then mount them in the bitspower q fitting:

    [​IMG]

    I then added on my VL4N QDC's (along with g1/4 g3/8 adapters):

    [​IMG]

    You can then add stop fittings and mount to your favorite waterblock and then leak test:

    [​IMG]

    Looks kinda frankenstein, but hopefully the performance will be worthwhile :thumb:

    I also made a video of the test setup here:

     
  7. stren

    stren New Member

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    I did get a little bit of time to work on the main build:

    [​IMG]

    I decided to simplify my linux disk system. I had bene using a raid card, 4 ssds and 4 HDDs and now that large SSD prices were coming down it seemed like a good time to consolidate.

    So I picked up a 512gb SSD to replace my 300 gigs worth made up of 4 drives:

    [​IMG]

    As well as a 3TB drive to replace my 3x1TB drives

    [​IMG]

    With linux drive if you're atuomatically mounting the drives then the order they get plugged in can matter. Going down to only 2 + an occasional backup makes life a lot easier when changing out motherboards.

    [​IMG]

    I normally buy WD drives, but as they hadn't released a 7200rpm 3TB sata drive I went with Seagate

    [​IMG]

    So I took out the side mount HDD system:

    [​IMG]

    And started taking out drives:

    [​IMG]

    The 512gb is actually smaller - 7mm tall while the older 128gb is 9mm:

    [​IMG]

    Spare drives:

    [​IMG]

    Nearly done:

    [​IMG]

    And done - the right drives will be for the gaming rig - 128gb boot, 2x128gb raid 0 for games, 32gb SLC for swap. The left drives are 512gb for boot/home of linux workstation, 128 temporary ssd that was left hooked up to transfer files, 3TB backup drive and 1TB old file storage.

    [​IMG]

    Now to sell the old stuff:

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Hanoken

    Hanoken O.O

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    [​IMG]

    What kind of screws did you use here may I ask? I'm looking for em and I cant find them XD, I love this build, reminds me of a giant simplistic tank... Something you can use to hammer someone with :D loving it!

    John
     
  9. KoSoVaR^

    KoSoVaR^ Professional Sleever & Modder

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    Do you sell the Black discs ? Could they be sent to sweden securely?
     
  10. stren

    stren New Member

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    You mean the intel SSDs?

    Coming soon:

    [​IMG]

    Oh and just to prove I'm still working on this project:

    [​IMG]

    Meanwhile I've also been busy working on this:

    [​IMG]
     
  11. Mizugetsu

    Mizugetsu New Member

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    Irrational hated rising,rising

    Looking good
     
  12. Phyonics

    Phyonics New Member

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    That EVGA PSU looks cool. The fans look great too, very clean.
     
  13. Parge

    Parge the worst Super Moderator

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    WELL looking forward to the waterblock roundup!

    Good work on the case too!
     
  14. stren

    stren New Member

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    Thanks everyone :):)


    So when the inlaws came I moved the water cooling test rig off of the floor. The TX10 makes a convenient stand and also protected it from my niece.

    [​IMG]

    The whole thing makes the 30" monitor look small

    Now that the august weather is here though I may have to move it to a different room - the extra heat is making it intolerable in here!
     
  15. TeenGeek

    TeenGeek Worst touch typing ever.

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    looking good! haha, if i had a case like that, i wouldnt know what to do with it... lol, mabe i would use one side as a computer modding/ bike repair tool shed lol!
     
  16. stren

    stren New Member

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    Yeah it makes it hard to decide haha!

    Another update:

    Finished up the gtx 560 - here are some pics. Getting ready to start:

    [​IMG]

    Chopping some heatshrink:

    [​IMG]

    2 fans done - ignore the yellow wire - I'm not actually hooking up the tach wire to the 12V, I just reused the yellow wire for the 12V line:

    [​IMG]

    One thing I learned is that you don't have to join the wires all in the same place, in fact it's easier and less bulky if you join the 12V wires at one point, the 0V wires at another point and do the sleeving join at another point. This way you don't get one big lump. So don't do it like this is what I'm saying:

    [​IMG]

    One side done - you can see the difference between the lumpy connection on the 3rd and 4th fan from the left, and the cleaner one on the 2nd/3rd:

    [​IMG]

    Now we have to move those fans on to the other (push) side of the radiator. So we have to add the 140mm adapters to the other side of the fan, and remove the adapters from the original side:

    [​IMG]

    All done with that side, now let's go do the same thing again for the pull side:

    [​IMG]

    Attaching the fans for the pull side:

    [​IMG]

    Nearly done - but the last piece of sleeve pulled out of the heatshrink:

    [​IMG]

    Replaced that section and all done:

    [​IMG]

    Installed - as you might be able to see, the section above with the low speed yates/HDDs still needs to be done:

    [​IMG]

    As you can see there's still a ton to do in the bottom compartment:

    [​IMG]

    This side that's open right now will house the ex560 that's currently being used for testing waterblocks, and the gtx 360 that I'm going to go wire up and sleeve right now :)

    I have some ideas for lighting too that I'm going to test out also :)
     
  17. stren

    stren New Member

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    Did a quick edit on the photos from yesterday's competition prize that came in:

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    [​IMG]

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    More to come later of it going in...
     
  18. TeenGeek

    TeenGeek Worst touch typing ever.

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    nice! btw, are you still going to use the monsoon fittings?
     
  19. stren

    stren New Member

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    Yes - they only just released the rotaries to resellers, so I'd been waiting for that before Gene sends me anything :)

    Some of the pics from the last week's adventures:

    Fitted the sniper to the 990x and installed some of the samsung superOC ram. Corsair promised to sponsor me some ram, but it never showed up and after 3 months of my emails being ignored I've officially given up on them :rolleyes:

    [​IMG]

    I want to make a custom waterblock for the RAM anyway, but that's still a gleam in my eye right now :thumb: Time to get to leak testing on the motherboard loop:

    [​IMG]

    After leak testing got done, I swapped the painted fan for one that worked and installed the motherboard tray into the *empty* chamber.

    [​IMG]

    I need to swap out the circuit board from the broken GT fan for a good one and then swap back in the painted one. Now it's time to start hooking everything back up:

    [​IMG]

    Plugged in the PSU cables, but the PSU is not yet there:

    [​IMG]

    The sleeving is the stuff that came with the evga psu, that will be replaced with mdpc-x later:

    [​IMG]

    Finally with a PSU:

    [​IMG]

    Those extra 6 pin headers are annoying but the nice thing is that most of the PSU cables can be flipped so you can hide some of the extra unwarted parts by plugging them in the other way round :)

    [​IMG]

    Tidying up a bit:

    [​IMG]

    There's still so much to be done, and so much of this is still temporary e.g. fittings/sleeve/loop layout etc etc. But for now I'm just glad to be finally getting this rig up and working after 8 months!
     
  20. Phyonics

    Phyonics New Member

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    Looking very smart! As always, these things take time to come together. Especially large builds such as this. As always, take your time and do it right :)
     
    Last edited: 29 Aug 2012

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