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Education Qualifications and Employment

Discussion in 'General' started by m0o0oeh, 18 Nov 2010.

  1. m0o0oeh

    m0o0oeh Well-Known Member

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    OK, so I'm looking into getting a few IT qualifications, and need some advice cause I've gone to two training providers and I'm getting conflicting information from them.

    TP1 wants to sign me up for the COMPTIA N+

    TP2 wants to sign me up for an MCSA, MCSE2010, and CCNA

    The price difference between the 2 is about 40 pounds a month

    TP2 says the N+ isn't worth the paper its written on, and won't get me an IT job.

    TP1 says to be careful of TP2 because they "guarantee" me a job interview.

    What I want to know is, who do I listen to?

    Do I go for the N+ because its more affordable?

    Or do I go for the Microsoft/Cisco courses and struggle to pay the course fee as well as any other bills I have to pay.

    Basically,

    HELP!!!
     
  2. liratheal

    liratheal Sharing is Caring

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    I've.. Never even heard of the COMPTIA N+.

    Then again, I've only been looking at what certain job listings ask for.

    What is it, exactly, you want to do?

    I'd probably ignore most of the guff the two providers say about the other, because they're interested in getting your money, and will try anything they can to sway you to their camp.

    To me, MSCA/MSCE2010/CCNA is more valuable in the IT world (In that most of the IT job listings I look at require at least one of them) than whatever that COMPTIA N+ is.

    Might be worth checking the open university, if you haven't already.

    Edit: Just read some bumph on CompTIA Network+, and I quote:

    "Microsoft includes CompTIA Network+ in their Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator (MCSA) program".

    I'd do the MSCA/MSCE2010 and CCNA, since that covers this CompTIA thing anyway, and gives you more recognisable certificates.
     
  3. nightblade628

    nightblade628 Member

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    May I just say, I'm an A+ qualified tech and NOWHERE will employ me based solely on that qualification - my passion and job goal is PC repair, and that is the defacto standard for that particular profession, yet nobody is interested unless you have experience.

    Network+ isn't a bad qualification, but it's incredibly basic and won't get you hired anywhere. Go for TP2's MCSE/CCNA, but be prepared, those qualification are long, incredibly hard and unless you're obsessed with that profession, will bore you to death very quickly. It's up to you in the end, you may end up loving them and it may be what you want to go into. Those are definitely the top degrees though.
     
  4. BentAnat

    BentAnat Software Dev

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    I'd have to agree with TP2 here.
    N+ (like A+) are not worth the paper they're written on.
    I've seen guys Pass BOTH (A+ and N+) that managed to put DDR RAM into a memory bank the wrong way around, breaking the motherboard.

    MCSE is not MUCH better (IMHO), but is in general worth more in the market. Coupled with CCNA, it's mroe worth it, provided the course includes international examination.
     
  5. saspro

    saspro IT monkey

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    There's no such thing as an MCSE2010.

    What part of IT do you work in or want to work in?

    THe MCITP cources are good, so is the CCNA stuff for networking
     
  6. saspro

    saspro IT monkey

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    ?

    Real MCSE's are worth their weight in gold
     
  7. adam_bagpuss

    adam_bagpuss Have you tried turning it off/on ?

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    dont listen to either of them and home learn instead or look at your local college/university or open university.

    they will make you pay through the noise for these qualifications the material and cost of test is around 10-20% of what they are gunna charge you.

    ive been down this route before and they are only trying to rip you off make you pay on finanace so they basically have you paying them for years.

    but MSCE's are worth it as far as a qualifications are considered A+/ N+ not really and i have never seen anywhere list it as a requirement or desirable even for the most basic IT jobs.

    TP1 wants you to do the N+ first and then he will say now lets do the MSCE or MCSA and you have to pay antoher huge sum.

    None of them can garuntee you a PERMANENT job after your qualified and from what ive read online they are usually just placements at call centres for 3-6months.
     
  8. saspro

    saspro IT monkey

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    CBT nuggets are good for home learning
     
  9. liratheal

    liratheal Sharing is Caring

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    Personally, I'm doing the majority of my CCNA though the open university. Nine months, a shade under nine hundred quid. Four exams, have to arrange the final overall exam yourself, but even with the cost of that, it's only going to work out to just shy of 1500, which is a darnsite less than - For example - South Birmingham College want for a two year course.
     
  10. saspro

    saspro IT monkey

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    ? CCNA is 1 exam (or two if you split the modules)
     
  11. Krazeh

    Krazeh Well-Known Member

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    There's an exam at the end of each module. Doesn't actually count towards the qualification tho apart from providing a discount on the actual proper exam if you pass all 4 first time or something.
     
  12. saspro

    saspro IT monkey

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    Is that the network academy program?

    As the exam is £100 or so there can't be much discount
     
  13. Krazeh

    Krazeh Well-Known Member

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    I believe so yeah. Dunno what the discount is but anything is better than nothing.
     
  14. m0o0oeh

    m0o0oeh Well-Known Member

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    Right, well both training providers are home learning courses (AFAIK that is)

    They are both lots of money, but if one is more likely to land me a job in the IT sector, then I'll try and find a way to pay the money.

    As a by-the-by, TP2 said that the MSCA/E that TP1 would provide was far out of date, from '03, and that their MSCA/E was the latest one. I sensed a hint of bullhockey.

    But if I want to get into IT, pref. the hands on side, repairing, netadmin etc, what qualifications would you guys say I'd need to look at, bearing in mind I am on the dole, and barely get 20 quid a week after paying off bills

    Thanks,

    Joe
     
    Last edited: 18 Nov 2010
  15. saspro

    saspro IT monkey

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    Personally I went down the MCP, MCSA, MCSAM, MCSA, MCTS, MCTIP route. I'll knock my CCNA out in the new year as well.

    At work we insist helpdesk are at least MCP, preferably MCSA or above.

    MCSA's & MCSE's are valued by employers but are really only worth it if you're working with Server 2003 systems (most companies are). They also give you a good background knowledge.
    CCNA's are always in demand.

    Depending on your skill level & experience I'd either go:
    MCSA then upgrade exams to MCTS then MCITP Server Admin if you've got some knowledge on networking & servers already and want a more network admin job (4 exams for MCSA, 1 upgrade exam then 1 MCITP exam)
    or
    MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Support Technician 7 if you're more comfortable with desktops and want to start with a more hands on role (2 exams in total)

    If you go the 2nd route you can always do MCITP server administrator & Enterprise Administrator afterwards.

    There's a wealth of learning materials available online & in books. The Microsoft Press books are good but can be a bit daunting at first as they're 1000 pages long and assume a level of knowledge before hand.
    CBT nuggets aren't the cheapest but are the closest thing to an instructure led class you're going to get without paying thousands on classroom courses.

    Hope this helps, feel free to get in touch if you need more advice. I plan all the training & certification paths for our engineers at work so get discounts on exams etc
     
  16. BentAnat

    BentAnat Software Dev

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    Some of the MCSE's are complete rubbish at what they do, and yet are Qualified MCSEs.
    Not saying that everyone with an MCSE is crap. More pointing out that there are a good few rotten apples out there that have somehow managed to pass the exam by plain cramming, rather than actually knowing what's going on.
     
  17. Krazeh

    Krazeh Well-Known Member

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    But isn't that the case with any qualification, IT or otherwise? There's always people who've passed exams by cramming rather than actually learning and understanding the material. Will always be the case unless an exam is made truly dynamic and therefore requires you to actually understand rather than being able to simply recite knowledge.
     
  18. BentAnat

    BentAnat Software Dev

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    From personal experience, I can tell you that some exams _do_ work properly.
    I know that the old MCSD Solution Architecture exam was VERY hard to pass on cramming alone.

    You have a point, though - most exams are crammable.
     

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