1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Music Rebuilding/Customizing my first trumpet...

Discussion in 'General' started by KayinBlack, 15 Jun 2010.

  1. KayinBlack

    KayinBlack Currently Rebuilding

    Joined:
    2 Jul 2004
    Posts:
    5,559
    Likes Received:
    302
    So, I've had to take some time off on my FlameProof project, due to health reasons, so I've been working on restoring my first trumpet, the one I started band with in 5th grade. That's a long time ago. In fact, the trumpet will be 21 in September.

    First, I'll start with some pics of what it looked like before. I didn't take any befores, but you'll be able to see the damage immediately when I show the pics of the work I've done.

    [​IMG]

    That established, let's start with an exploded schematic of what we're looking at here.

    [​IMG]

    On my horn, 24 was missing, as were two pieces of 76 and the entire thing was dented, as well as the leadpipe (18) was ruined. The leadpipes of the YTR-2320 was designed for secure "slotting," or note placement, but it felt stuffy when you got more air than a beginner. Mine was especially bad. This was confirmed by three different technicians.

    So, what's a guy to do?

    First off, that leadpipe is GONE. I think I'll use it for sacrificial brass.

    Now, for the rest of it...

    [​IMG]

    There's the stripped valve cluster. The black is from burned epoxy lacquer during disassembly. If you can't work vented, work outside. Rule #1.

    [​IMG]

    Various bits and bobs, as well as a slide cooling in a bowl of water and an outer slide tube I'm modifying.

    [​IMG]

    Third valve slide and the bell, also damaged.

    [​IMG]

    The first valve slide, rebuilt to accept a saddle on the top tube for tuning purposes. This was not in the original design spec for this model.

    [​IMG]

    Another shot, showing the burned lacquer and solder that will have to be scraped.

    [​IMG]

    Both slides reinstalled, checking alignment. This will be repeated throughout the process.

    [​IMG]

    The first slide, freed of lacquer. That took a LOT of effort.

    [​IMG]

    Valve cluster, partially cleaned up.

    [​IMG]

    When all else fails, kill the lacquer with fire. It's HIGHLY chemical resistant (more on that in a moment) but the fire burned it to the point where two more days with superfine steel wool removed it. Yeah, two more.

    [​IMG]

    Remember I mentioned alignment? The fire warped the soft solder connections, requiring me to spend two hours getting them back into line. But I did. Persistence and patience.

    [​IMG]

    More of the fire damage to lacquer and the valve slides. This is all fixable, not too difficult but it LOOKS like hell.

    [​IMG]

    The trumpet bell, with the lacquer partially burned off. The bell also had the fortunate side effect of being annealed by the process. Two birds with one frog.

    That's where the pics stop for now, but rest assured I have more progress I need to shoot tomorrow. The valve cluster will be almost unrecognizable, I promise...

    This thread is in response to the mention of handcrafting horns in the Foxconn thread, this is what I do ever since I was handicapped-nothing but time now, and this is a lot of hurry up and wait.
     
    pimonserry likes this.
  2. GreatOldOne

    GreatOldOne Wannabe Martian

    Joined:
    29 Jan 2002
    Posts:
    12,092
    Likes Received:
    112
    Ooo. Nice work so far. :thumb:

    God, it's a long time since I played brass (school band) - drove my parents to distraction practicing. :)
     
  3. lex90

    lex90 Member

    Joined:
    5 Aug 2005
    Posts:
    600
    Likes Received:
    5
    Ermm.. couldnt you just sandblast the laquer off and then repolish the brass afterwards.
     
  4. KayinBlack

    KayinBlack Currently Rebuilding

    Joined:
    2 Jul 2004
    Posts:
    5,559
    Likes Received:
    302
    Because the goal is to remove as little metal as possible... Even now thanks to the brass pitting I'm going to have to build up copper on this. That would remove almost half the brass in the bell, which would ruin it.

    Back to work...

    [​IMG]

    A lot cleaner, no? Also, you can see the heavy top caps I got from Mouthpiece Express. Until I can turn my own, they're a great alternative.

    [​IMG]

    What's that by the first valve slide? Trumpets don't have that?

    [​IMG]

    A closer look...

    [​IMG]

    Something strange on the bell tail...

    [​IMG]

    That's where my left thumb rested. Acidic sweat, it's a major problem in brasses. This horn may get satin gold on the valve body.

    [​IMG]

    It's a self-supporting tuning bell! First of their kind, I designed it myself. Not quite done, but it's getting there...

    [​IMG]

    No braces, but it stays where it's supposed to-without set screws!

    More when I get some more brass-I need to do some MAJOR mods to this yet.
     
  5. stuartwood89

    stuartwood89 Please... Just call me Stu.

    Joined:
    20 Aug 2008
    Posts:
    1,566
    Likes Received:
    52
    I'll just leave this here:

    [​IMG]
     
    GreatOldOne and KayinBlack like this.
  6. KayinBlack

    KayinBlack Currently Rebuilding

    Joined:
    2 Jul 2004
    Posts:
    5,559
    Likes Received:
    302
    That was so good I saved it. Excellent shop.
     
  7. KayinBlack

    KayinBlack Currently Rebuilding

    Joined:
    2 Jul 2004
    Posts:
    5,559
    Likes Received:
    302
    So, more work on the horn. This time has serious chemical work, do not attempt this at home unless like me you carry a Hazmat Class C or better certification. Or a chemistry degree.

    I put a patina on the horn to age the brass, to approximate seawater. The horn was tough tough brass, though, so how to do this?

    The formula is this: a paste of table salt and tap water (those minerals are important here) is dolloped onto the valve body exterior. None in slide tubes, none in valve casings, none on slide surfaces. This is followed by a liberal spray of methylene chloride to accelerate the process. And how did it turn out?

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    And, the old main slide. It's got red rot (as you can see,) a condition caused by spot dezincification of brass. Brass is more corrosion resistant than copper, so areas with red rot tend to corrode faster. This main slide is not reuseable. So, I salvaged off the slide legs and I'll find something to do with the crook.

    More parts are on the way, more insane homemade chemistry, and I swear to you you've never seen finger buttons like the ones I have planned for this. Stay tuned!
     
  8. KayinBlack

    KayinBlack Currently Rebuilding

    Joined:
    2 Jul 2004
    Posts:
    5,559
    Likes Received:
    302
    [​IMG]

    What in the blue hell am I doing?

    [​IMG]

    Seriously, what am I doing?

    [​IMG]

    Is that soap?

    [​IMG]

    If it is, ever seen soap do THAT?

    It's a mix of hydrogen peroxide and ammonia. Bubbles everything off anything placed in it.

    [​IMG]

    Now that we're down to base metal, it's time for some real work. Home stretch on some of these pieces...

    [​IMG]

    And what is this?

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Trumpet-now in blackened finish!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The last one is to give an idea of size if you don't play trumpet. That is pretty tiny.
     
  9. pimonserry

    pimonserry sounds like a party.

    Joined:
    20 Dec 2008
    Posts:
    2,113
    Likes Received:
    75
    It's a vuvuzela!

    I've never seen anything quite like this :eek:
     
  10. JCBeastie

    JCBeastie New Member

    Joined:
    10 Nov 2005
    Posts:
    285
    Likes Received:
    8
    Whoa!

    Was not expecting this to get interesting... :p

    Can't wait to see the finished thing now; you've got some talent there.
     

Share This Page