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Motors Rust Repair

Discussion in 'General' started by mikecx, 6 May 2004.

  1. mikecx

    mikecx What's a Dremel?

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    Not sure if this belongs in Motors or not, but it deals with cars.

    I've got a 1964 Chevelle SS sitting for me when I get off break here at the Uni. It's in pretty bad shape, but I plan on doing a lot of the needed work on it myself.

    So far the list of things that need to be done include: Tranny swap, carb rebuild, paint, interior.

    The most i've done with a car so far in my life is change the oil, battery, brakes, and small repairs.

    Now, my priority lies in getting the new tranny and replacing it but i'll tackle that as it comes to me. My dilema for today is how to properly do the rust repair. It's got some larger spots of rust that will some how need to be taken care of. My question is, what's the proper procedure to take care of these spots so that the rust doesn't come back through the expensive paint job that's going on it in the end.
     
  2. xen0morph

    xen0morph Bargain wine connoisseur

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    Your best bet may be to basically cut around the rust and try and fill the hole with fiberglass filler. This is coming from someone who's never done rust repair though, so you probably shouldn't listen to me :)
     
  3. penski

    penski BodMod

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    The best way to do it if you're wanting a good finish for a quality paint job is to cut out the metal, replace it with new metal, weld it in, grind off the extraneous weld, smooth it down, polish it well and get everything smooth with a little bit of body filler.

    Ideally, you want to remove all existing paint (you may find something nasty underneath it, be prepared for things like chicken wire and polyfilla) down to the bare metal then remove all rust without exception and reconstrust with metal and a good quality body filler.

    Once it is all smooth and perfect, you can send it off to be painted.

    *n
     
  4. Slick13

    Slick13 What's a Dremel?

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    This is all dependant on how much rust there is on the car, you don't have to go to the extreme of cutting it out and the welding new metal into it. sometimes the best way is to sand down to the bare metal and then smooth it out. Coatings of primer and then basecoat have to be applied before hand. at least 4-5 of each with time allowing to dry properly inbetween. Then a top coat (4 or so) and then cover it with laquer.

    If you are going to weld a new peice of metal into the car then don't smooth it out too much and definately don't polish it, this will give the coat of filler nothing to bond to thus it will go off and then fall straight off the metal. You can add the fibreglass although this is more of a quick fix than anything else. will eventually rot through again. Also depending where the rust is you have to consider is it going to be getting wet all the time, or exposed to harsher conditions than the rest of the car, all of this will help make up your mind what would suit the cause best.
     
  5. mikecx

    mikecx What's a Dremel?

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    The rust is mostly on the upper body and as soon as I get the paintjob for it, it's going to be consitantly in a covered lot. There are some larger spots last time I checked, but I can guarentee no chicken wire since the cars been in my dads hands since it was purchased unless it came stock with chicken wire :D . Anyways, if I were to go out and buy a welder and needed to replace a large section, how would I go about it? I mean, what kind of welder would be needed / work best, and do I put the metal below the current metal, above it, a little smaller. Obviously i'd practice before trying to weld to the car.
     
  6. penski

    penski BodMod

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    Welding is a good skill to have.

    The best type of welder to go for would probably be MIG (Metal Inert Gas) - it is relatively easy to learn and use.

    Go to a local high school or similar - they may have a metalworking class or something along those lines after school hours where you could learn how to weld.

    As to what to use for replacing metal. The best thing, if you can get it, is an identical part from a non-rusty car. eg: If the offside sill is rotten on your car, try to find a clean offside sill from a scrapyard or something and then it would be a simple swap out of panels.

    If welding new metal into a flat panel, cut a square around the rust, cut replacement metal to the same size and weld in place. You can go overboard on the welding slightly but as long as you grind the welds back you should be fine.

    *n
     
  7. :: Phat ::

    :: Phat :: Oooh shakalaka!

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    The ARC welder at home is a seriously fun piece of kit... not when it's plugged into the sockets "NOT FOR ARC WELDER" in the warehouse though :blush:
     
  8. penski

    penski BodMod

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    If it's fun you're after, go with Oxy-Acetelene.

    *n
     
  9. kiljoi

    kiljoi I *am* a computer king.

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    :rock:
    I love this stuff. When I was taking metal-shop, I used to run aroun with the tanks on the dolley cutting holes in everything I could find. Either that, or cranking up the voltage on the arc welder all the way, and then finding the thinnest sheet of metal I could and melting it. We used to get pieces of square tubing, weld it to a base plate, and then just melt electrodes into it to make a solid mass. So much fun....

    Sorry for the off topic post...
     
  10. brianpodskalny

    brianpodskalny ladies night!

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    replacement body panels would be the easiest way, im gonna try to hunt u up a link.

    failing that, metal is your best bet. you can pick up a real small mig welder for under 200 US dollars. if you have a harbor freight in your town, they are the cheapest. if not them see if you can find a "tractor supply co" (actual name of the company). they have good prices on tools if you look for the right thing. both places have websites you can order from, google it.

    personally, to get my truck to pass inspection i just cut the metal out, stripped the rust inside the fenders, undercoated the hell outta it and sprayed "great stuff" expanding foam in there. then i shaved the foam down a bit and fiberglassed over it, and its awaiting a final filler overcoat.

    wouldnt reccomend that for you tho, its an old work truck, not going for showroom quality
     
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