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Salary review, help needed

Discussion in 'General' started by rK@NE, 18 Dec 2006.

  1. rK@NE

    rK@NE Rover's gonna get it...

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    Right bit of a long story this...

    I've worked for a major retailer (who shall remain nameless ;)) for six years. Nearly three years ago I was working on a national based team of merchandisers, basically we'd travel around Europe merchandising and overseeing the opening of new stores.

    At the time I was on £14,000 p/a plus a bonus of £250 per store for the first 10 stores and £400 per store after. In my first year on the job We did 13 stores so my total earnings were £17,700. At the beginning of the following year I took a promotion and moved to head office to work in the merchandising department. Being young and naive I accepted that my salary would be frozen due to "budgets" etc, although I was given a bonus of £3000 to make up some of the difference. Anyway, end of year comes and the company miss their covenants (they didn't have enough money in the bank, despite record profits) I didn't see a penny of my bonus (despite exceeding targets) so effectively I took a pay cut.

    The next year I got a 5% rise to take my salary up to £14,700 but no bonus scheme was introduced, again quite a large pay deficit.

    In the time I have been in my current role the department has grown from what was a token gesture to an integral part of the companies business plan and our importance and responsibilities has increased with it, but this hasn't been reflected in pay.

    I currently live with a friend and pay practically no rent so at the moment I'm well off but I've got to start looking for my own place, on my current salary renting or a mortgage would cripple me.

    Anyway salaries are decided in January and this time I'm determined not to get screwed over.

    I need advice on how to negotiate a pay rise. This is an area I've always felt weak at. I feel greedy and guilty when I think about asking for more money!

    So what are my angles that I can exploit? Can I use the fact that I can barely afford to house myself as a viable argument or will I sound like a whining little bitch? The thing is Are you supposed to specify an amount you want or do you leave it up to the them? I do an excellent job and this has been echoed by my managers and even some directors...

    Advice please :)
     
    Last edited: 18 Dec 2006
  2. Hiren

    Hiren mind control Moderator

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    Tell them what you've just told us, that despite your promotion your now paid less for more work and you never recieved the bonus that was originally promised.
     
  3. Highland3r

    Highland3r Minimodder

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    ^^ Agree with Hiren.

    See what their response to that is. With the experience you've had you should be on a LOT more than you are, you'd certainly get a better wage elsewhere use that as a bargaining tool. Might be worth scouting about for similar jobs/jobs elsewhere, if they don't offer you what you hoped (and aren't willing to offer somewhere around what you want) then tell em you'll walk. It's cheaper for them to offer you a payrise than it is for them to loose you're 6 years+ of experience, plus find a replacement etc. With the experience you have got, shouldn't be too hard finding work that's better paid elsewhere.
    Hell, you could go for for Morrisons as a cashier and get paid a similar wage for much less hassle :p
     
  4. kenco_uk

    kenco_uk I unsuccessfully then tried again

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    I'm in a similar bind. I started off at £8,500 then after a year went to £10,500. A year after it was £12,000, then £12,500, then £14,000 then £14,500. So in the space of about four years, I managed a £6,000 addition to my salary. My last pay rise was nearly four years ago and I can't remember the last 'appraisal' I had. I keep hinting heavily about payrises or bonuses but it seems to fall on deaf ears.

    I used to be, in effect, a secretary/filing person. Now I'm more IT technical oriented, offering a 'pc helpline', remote logging in, problem solving, building/repairing PC's amongst other responsibilities.. together with a fair amount of filing work that I still do. The last time I asked for a payrise I was told I was in a 'well paid, lowly administrative role'. Kinda makes you feel good, huh?

    The trouble is, the place is good to work at, otherwise I'd find somewhere else. I just wish I was paid a little more. I'm not greedy.. if I was offered £20k I'd snap it up as would anyone, but another grand or two a year would be incredibly handy.

    /blog :)
     
  5. whisperwolf

    whisperwolf What's a Dremel?

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    You'll need to request a 1-1 with your boss, tell them your concerns as you listed above. Take with you a list of tasks your role started with and a list of your current tasks. Do a bit of research on some job sites (not whilst at work) to find the salery band other companies are offering in your area. Also any written proof of work done well is useful whilst negotiating.

    Of course if all else fails and it worked for me once, start browsing the job pages of newspapers in your lunch break and circling the ones you fancy, and leaving it on your desk whilst you boss walks past. I did it and a day later my boss asked for a chat gave me a better role and more cash.
     
    Last edited: 18 Dec 2006
  6. Mother-Goose

    Mother-Goose 5 o'clock somewhere

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    You have got to be assertive and state that it is unacceptable. I'ce just graduated uni and I am now a system testing management consultant, and its taught me that the best way to get what you want is not to be agressive but to be strong, you've got your facts, try and find some figures for similar jobs to back up your argument. Make sure you get your feelings across and always threaten with resigning, you probably wont but they cant take the risk by the sounds of it. Getting a pay rise is like playing texas holdem, you need to bluff but still have a decent hand (thats where the facts come in) :)

    EDIT: What wisperwolf said lol
     
  7. 13000

    13000 Banned

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    If you find it hard to talk to your boss(es) then write it all down in a letter and get it sent that way. I find that this way is better, as then you don't have the bigwigs umm and arring at your request(s). It's also easier to get your point across, as I know I clam up when asking arkward questions. And you'll avoid all that as it's in a letter.

    :)
     
  8. Mother-Goose

    Mother-Goose 5 o'clock somewhere

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    Good point, have a letter as well :thumb: just slip it in "i've taken the time to write these points down for you for future refference", btw, how old are you if you dont mind us knowing :)
     
  9. rK@NE

    rK@NE Rover's gonna get it...

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    I'm 24.

    A lot of good advice here which is great, I think I'm going to write my feelings down in a letter and then request a 1-1 to discuss it. While I can see the merit of threatening to resign the idea is a bit worrying ;)
     
  10. calnen

    calnen moo!!

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    You dont have to threaten as such - I'm sure you could get the idea across by pointing out similar jobs that pay better, and stressing that you need the money.
     
  11. rK@NE

    rK@NE Rover's gonna get it...

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    I drafted this and fired it off, waiting for a response.

    Thoughts?
     
  12. herbs

    herbs Nobody but us chickens

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    As Alan sugar says on that tv show "Your Fired". But seriously it seems you did it in a proper manner, maybe not at the right time of year though in my view. Also is it really a good idea to post it on the internet, fair enough asking for advice but you seemed to have given out too many details in my view.
     
  13. The cheapskate

    The cheapskate One custom title before Matty

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    Hes not used the company name, nor his own, so I cant see why its a problem. even if his boss comes online and reads this, theres nothing he can do, as nothing directly relates to any company

    (unless ive missed something stupid)
     
  14. rK@NE

    rK@NE Rover's gonna get it...

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    Herbs,

    The financial year for us begins January 1st and so salary and budgeting is done to fit in line with this. I spoke to my manager briefly about this earlier in the year and he asked me to prompt him about it towards Christmas which I have done.

    As for posting on the internet I'll take my chances but I appreciate your concern :thumb:
     
  15. devenfore

    devenfore LANCandy

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    I would change that last line to something like:

    "I would very much like to discuss this with you as soon as possible, as I know budgeting for next year is coming up very soon."

    Just my opinion though.

    Good Luck! :)
     
  16. 13000

    13000 Banned

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    CTRL + P, and get it posted. :thumb: Sounds perfect to me.
     
  17. Nexxo

    Nexxo * Prefab Sprout – The King of Rock 'n' Roll

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    Please find my suggestions highlighted in red.

    - Remind your boss that he suggested you send this e-mail.

    - Avoid vague and subjective terms as "healthy", "implied" etc. Stay objective.

    - performance is "recognised", and pay awarded, not "given". You "accepted" the job (which was offered you), you did not "take" it. Talk from a position of strength. You earned it.

    - Mention explicitly when something was agreed.

    - Don't argue personal circumstances, or that you need the money. This is business. You earned the money.

    I like the way you mention that you researched other jobs for comparison. :thumb:
     
  18. Mother-Goose

    Mother-Goose 5 o'clock somewhere

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    Nexxo is right, thats pretty much the kind of letter I would send. At 24 you should not be on a 14k salary!!
     
  19. empyrean

    empyrean What's a Dremel?

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    Very civilized letter, well done.
     
  20. rK@NE

    rK@NE Rover's gonna get it...

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    Result! I had a meeting with my boss and the director today and have been given what I asked for (£17,500) as well as a tidy bonus (£3,000) :rock:

    Thank you all for your help on the matter, it's given me the confidence to deal with this in a more professional manner.

    :thumb:
     

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