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Education School's "Protecting Your Children Online" meeting.

Discussion in 'General' started by TraumaticHug, 2 Feb 2012.

  1. TraumaticHug

    TraumaticHug What's a Dremel?

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    Main point, and for the "WTF is with all the words?!" crowd:

    Have any of you guys ever been shocked at how your friends' or your family's lack of computer knowledge has endangered their kids?

    I feel quite grateful that most of mine are quite knowledgable.



    So my son's primary school had a (depressingly poorly-attended) meeting for parents, organised after the massive increase in pupils owning smartphones after Christmas and to help educate some parents on how to protect their kids online. I went figuring I may learn something new, and while I didn't I admit it was targeted more at the less knowledgable parent.

    It was hosted by both the parent council and a police officer who was a member of CEOP (part of the VGT), who mentioned the Think U Know website a LOT, but was amazingly brutal and honest.


    Anyway, I was quite shocked at how little the parents knew. Especially as some of these people not only bought their primary-school kids smartphones, but some had given iPads and laptops, too, without putting proper security measures in place.







    Some examples the officer gave that I spout when there is a lull in conversation:


    Parents setting up Facebook pages for their kids (some as young as 5), and including personal details like what school they go to, likes/dislikes etc.. The officer described this as "advertising your kids to peaodophiles." ("At that age your kid's friends know what school he/she goes to!")

    How ridiculously easy it is for Facebook accounts to be hacked when you know just a little about the person.

    The law regarding cyberbullying is such that is is not what your intent was, but what the other person thought you intended. An example given was 4 local highschool kids who had been convicted after silly comments they had made online all on the same classmate's post. This resulted in their university placements being rejected.

    6 people applying for the police were knocked back because of what they had on their Facebook, one was even convicted.

    Get it across to your kids that once it is on the internet it is there for life.

    He had been given the laptop of a colleague's 12-yr-old daughter to investigate (for valid reasons, not just paranoia). His colleague was in tears when he returned the salvage transcripts of the sex chat sites she had been going on.

    Increasing cases of pre-teens addicted to porn (not just a general statistic.. he was in the middle of working with some of the kids from the local schools and had noticed a sharp increase in the 6 years he had been working with CEOP).

    Kids thinking porn is how loving sex is actually done.. "It's okay for him to slap me, yeah?"





    ||
    I started mentioning OpenDNS as a good way of blocking sites from outwith the home, meaning children can't circumvent parental locks on the PC, especially as it'd also block these sites when using a phone's WIFI.. but then aaeeaah why are you all looking at me stop it.. stop it!

    man, I do not do public speaking :(
     

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