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News Seagate confirms 3TB drives

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by CardJoe, 19 May 2010.

  1. RichCreedy

    RichCreedy Hey What Who

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    small is beautiful, what we need is 100TB on 1" drives
     
  2. Lemmingzappa

    Lemmingzappa New Member

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    I wont ever be buying from Seagate again.
     
  3. l3v1ck

    l3v1ck Fueling the world, one oil well at a time.

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    Why? (genuine question, not sarcasm)
    The only hard drives I've seen fail are Fujitsu ones.
     
  4. Fizzban

    Fizzban Man of Many Typos

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    Had a Quantum(Matrox) Fireball fail (80GB). It was old though. I'd had it 3 or 4 years and it was second hand when I bought it. I've had a laptop hardrive fail too but I can't remember what company it was. (too lazy to look)
     
    Last edited: 19 May 2010
  5. LAGMonkey

    LAGMonkey Group 7 error

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    mmmm tastey.
    but definatly need the backup, preferiably RAID.
    Im a bit exposed at the moment with my server. Ive got 4x 500gig drives (XFS) in RAID5 and now a single 1.5TB drive.
    I was desperate and needed the space but now i have a single point of failure again.
    Cost is an issue once you start going big... next upgrade for me will be EXPENCIVE as i need a new PSU, new UPS, new RAID controller, new motherboard, etc etc etc....
     
  6. Byron C

    Byron C Probably isn't Hitler, but definitely a muppet

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    Frankly, we need an overhaul in some of the fundamental PC technology that's in use. I'm not talking about processor architectures or RAM, etc, but exactly things like this: LBA, BIOS, PS/2 ports, etc. Tech that was designed well over 10/20 years ago, but still plays a fundamental part in the PC architecture.
     
  7. ZERO <ibis>

    ZERO <ibis> Member

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    Hey I like my old ps/2 ports!
     
  8. Star*Dagger

    Star*Dagger New Member

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    If you are running an almost decade old OS you deserve... nothing.
     
  9. Byron C

    Byron C Probably isn't Hitler, but definitely a muppet

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    They're useless! They do nothing except take up space on the motherboard, which could easily be used for something like extra USB, FireWire, eSATA, etc...
     
  10. Byron C

    Byron C Probably isn't Hitler, but definitely a muppet

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    Businesses are probably the biggest WinXP users, rather than the home market. It gets a little more costly to replace the OS when you have to start looking at volume licensing. The company I work for has around 70,000 employees in the UK and every single computer in use (except servers and data room equipment) runs XP.

    Of course, businesses aren't likely to start installing 3Tb hard drives in their user terminals! ;)
     
  11. Gradius

    Gradius IT Consultant

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  12. Gradius

    Gradius IT Consultant

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    Not really, if your USB ports fails to be activated from POST, you cannot even control your machine! I had a MB like that once, and couldn't get any control from it, except from PS/2 keyboard.

    This is why they still sells MBs with PS/2 connector, the same is true for floppy disk drive (for recovery from a bad firmware flashing). A good solution are those MB with more than a single IC firmware (BIOS) on it, but there is no a true solution for replace PS/2 still.
     
  13. [WP@]WOLVERINE

    [WP@]WOLVERINE New Member

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    TBH a drive that doesnt work as a drive should is freakin useless no matter how big it is!
     
  14. The_Beast

    The_Beast I like wood ಠ_ಠ

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    If you want 10TB drives you might have to go to 5.25" drives :hehe:
     
  15. erratum1

    erratum1 New Member

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    Storage is getting so massive and cheap. What the hell do you fill these things up with.......blu ray dvd rips ? Maybe amatuer photography or videography.
     
  16. RichCreedy

    RichCreedy Hey What Who

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    i had to work on a dell pc that had no ps2 ports, and some numpty disabled usb in bios, had to reset bios, to get ports back
     
  17. Fizzban

    Fizzban Man of Many Typos

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    EVERYTHING.....

    I got a 1TB hard drive 2 or 3 months ago and it's 1/3 full. I'm not even trying. I am burning off less stuff however.
     
  18. SteveW-87

    SteveW-87 I haz ur computer genitalia

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    There is nothing wrong with PS/2 ports, nothing acts as a better backup when things go wrong.

    Plus, they are so much easier to use when business have systems linked up to a KVM

    Things have been overhauled in the timescale you mention, ISA slots are gone, and so are AGP. hell even the north bridge has been combined into the CPU now

    Computing has evolved massively!
     
  19. Byron C

    Byron C Probably isn't Hitler, but definitely a muppet

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    Gah, don't even get me started on floppy drives! I long for the day when that waste of space connector is removed from the motherboard! Think how many extra SATA ports could fit in that space... If you have a bad BIOS flash, the chances are that you've shafted your motherboard. Unless you have a backup like dual BIOS chips, it's likely that your board won't even post and get to the point where you can boot from any device. For any other times you could possibly need to boot from floppy disk, USB sticks are far more flexible and hold far more data. Plus they're damn cheap!

    If your USB ports aren't working, then using PS/2 mice and keyboards aren't going to save you fully; that still means that there's probably something fundamentally wrong with your motherboard, and it likely needs to be replaced.

    Yes technology has evolved massively - I never disputed that. Hell, I remember having a whole 2mb of RAM in my Atari STe and thinking I was the bee's knees. However some parts/standards we are using are still decades old - floppy drives being a prime example. LBA, as pointed out in the article, is another great example: it was a standard developed when people could not even conceive that we would have such vast storage capacity in home computers. Why do we still hang on to this stuff when there are better alternatives? Why are we still using BIOS when one of it's primary roles was long ago taken away from it? (Specifically, controlling I/O devices - hence "Basic Input/Output System". The only time it controls I/O devices now is when bootstrapping). Why aren't we using better tech like EFI?
     
  20. Pricester

    Pricester New Member

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    As I recall, the first hard disks that were over 100MB required a similar level of "special" support in the BIOS, and were all supplied with floppy disks with the drivers that let DOS and Windows access them as if they were normal disks...

    That was at least 10 years ago though - and I can't really remember the details, since by the time I got my hands on one, my PC already had support, so there was nothing to do (except read the instructions and worry slightly in case it didn't work!)

    The problem is of course that 10 years ago, only the real techies would consider upgrading their PC themselves, and so anyone looking at doing that would understand the problem - whereas now, anyone with a Facebook account seems to think they can just upgrade as and when they like...
     
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