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News Sealey E540 Multi-Purpose Rotary Tool Review

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by CardJoe, 30 Aug 2011.

  1. CardJoe

    CardJoe Freelance Journalist

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  2. RedFlames

    RedFlames ...is not a Belgian football team

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    so going by these reviews, if you want a dremel, buy a dremel.
     
  3. Stuey

    Stuey You will be defenestrated!

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    That's not entirely unexpected.

    For me, I wouldn't readily purchase anything lighter duty than a Dremel. Time and time again I have seen colleagues' other-branded tools either fail to complete tasks or self-destruct due to being pushed too hard.
     
  4. Claave

    Claave You Rebel scum

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    Always good to challenge/verify assumptions though, no?

    And these are technically rotary tools - the fact that Dremel has become synonymous with this term for modders is, of course, telling...
     
  5. Krikkit

    Krikkit All glory to the hypnotoad! Super Moderator

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    Worthwhile having a look at them though, got to check if Dremel deserves its top spot as rotary tool win. I must say I've had my Dremel for a long old time now and it shows no signs of wear or dying. The only thing it could do with is the flexi thingy, but I'm not quite ready to spend £30 for one just yet. :p
     
  6. RedFlames

    RedFlames ...is not a Belgian football team

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    @ Stuey, Claave & Krikkit

    clearly my comment didn't come across how I expected/meant it to... I appreciate you challenging/verifying Dremel's position at the top but it just seemed to be a foregone conclusion across the articles that the Dremel was going to come out on top... but that may just be me...

    I've lost count of how many times I've had someone give me a blank look when I've said 'rotary tool' only for them to say 'well why didn't you say so!' when I've then said 'Dremel'

    Personally i find the quality of the bits/cutting disks to be the important thing, the actual tool is neither here nor there though some seem to be clearly geared towards a certain task and some are better than others build/motor wise... My personal experience of using Dremels is I found them uncomfortable to hold for any length of time, a failing not limited solely to Dremels mind...

    One thing i have noticed though is cordless ones are crap, no exceptions...
     
  7. Stuey

    Stuey You will be defenestrated!

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    Ah, I see what you mean now.

    'Dremel ' has become a ubiquitous phrase, similar to "Sawzall", "Channellocks", and "Crescent wrench."

    imho, there are a lot of factors that led to Dremel's success and why their tools are usually far better than than much cheaper clones.

    Yes, accessory quality does make a difference as well. I generally use Dremel accessories, but also use Foredom and random industrial bits and burs as well.

    Use of the flex-shaft is definitely recommended for prolonged use. Like you, I find it uncomfortable to hold these types of tools for long periods of time.

    As for cordless models being crap, I tried out the newish 8200, and it's actually quite superb. It may actually be a bit overpowered, and battery life may sometimes be an issue, but it's great when there are no outlets closeby or when a quick task needs to be completed overheard.
     
  8. memeroot

    memeroot aged and experianced

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    personally I would want a 1m flexishaft attached to a big box under the desk - bliss


    any suggestions
     
  9. Combatus

    Combatus Bit-tech Modding + hardware reviews Staff Super Moderator

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    In an ideal world I'd own both a corded and cordless one but thankfully I rarely need a Dremel in a location my power extension lead can't reach!

    I've been in two minds about the quality of accessories. On one hand, a half decent tool plus hard-wearing bits will last most people years. On the other, they are cheap and more importantly some tools are far more comfortable than others, and while I've heard plenty of people complain about non-Dremel's burning out, I have yet to hear about a broken Dremel. Even then you can buy replacement parts.

    Having now used nearly 10 in the last year, only two of which were made by Dremel, I think it's definitely worth investing in a decent tool to start with, especially if you intend to use it a lot.
     
  10. Stuey

    Stuey You will be defenestrated!

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    You definitely have a point there. I would rather have a lesser quality tool with better cutting bits than a better quality tool with poorer bits. For the most part, I've been quite satisfied with Dremel's accessories and attachments. Some bits are designed to wear quickly (this is how I learned why the cutting-kit came with 50 cutting wheels!), but the more durable ones last a while. I picked up a grinding wheel cleaner and sanding drum cleaner to make those bits last a while longer.

    For case modding and hobby use, a cordless rotary tool won't be the best choice.

    One thing I don't share is your affinity for hard tool cases. I've never really found a blow-molded case or hard Dremel case that I've liked. When putting a corded tool away, I always end up with a bulging cord. I know that many people like to keep all their accessories in the case as well, but I have accumulated so many that I like to keep them separate. I'm not thrilled about soft cases, but at least they can be reappropriated if I choose to store the tool in a drawer or larger toolbox.
     
  11. thil

    thil New Member

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    Ah. I'd never heard of this brand ever...when I first read this review two weeks ago in AtomicMPC in sunny (at the time) Brisbane, Queensland. Australia.

    I'm just wondering what exactly *is* bit-tech's relationship with Atomic? I see a lot of bit-tech content in the pages of that magazine. I'm not seeking to judge or anything, just curious.

    Atomic, as far as I can tell, has yet to fully identify their sources, even when an article is utterly irrelevant to its readership, like this review of a rotary tool that is unable to be obtained in Australia. Curiouser and curiouser.

    Any other Aussies notice this?
     
  12. Waynio

    Waynio Relaxing

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    Antony nows your chance to hear from someone who has got through 4 or 5 dremels :lol: all the 300 or 3000 model can't remember properly, they can't handle what I like to do with them :D but yeah if it was for light duty stuff they would have lasted a lot longer & even more so if I used a flexi shaft & made a rig to hold the tool & add a fan to it so it never overheats, I'll know for when I buy another :D, I have tried a £20 air rotary tool & holy moly it can go all day, never gets warm in fact it ends up freezing your hands but is awkward for using as you have to keep the thing pressed down while using it but has unbeatable torque for a rotary tool.

    When I do get around to buying a dremel again though it will be for anything but cutting stuff now I have a good scroll saw, they are super handy tools & was my first modding tool & it is a keeper but for lengthy cut outs a scroll saw is seriously awesome & really leaves rotary tools waaaay behind ;).
     
  13. Combatus

    Combatus Bit-tech Modding + hardware reviews Staff Super Moderator

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    We live and learn :D I think all the tools could do with better cooling. I mean a few tiny vents with a high power motor drawing over 100W and doing over 25,000rpm isn't a great solution but as you say, if you're mainly cutting, this is probably the worst case scenario for any rotary tool, and if you do it a lot then things will eventually wear out. A scroll saw or the Dremel Trio are worth considering - I see you already have the former :thumb:
     
  14. hyperion

    hyperion Active Member

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    Draper do a 140W rotary tool which I've considered purchasing myself. Could be worth a look.
     
  15. RedFlames

    RedFlames ...is not a Belgian football team

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    I used to have a draper rotary tool [may not be the one you're referring to though], the tool itself was ok [the motor was *loud* though], the bits that came with it were terrible but the tool itself was ok...
     
  16. SuicideNeil

    SuicideNeil New Member

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    Black & Decker wizard for the next test then? I've had mine for so long I can't remember- tough as nails, big case that holds loads of attachments in their own compartments, variable speed, flex shaft compatible... would be a worthy competitor to the Dremel...
     
  17. Lizard

    Lizard @ Scan R&D

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    Probably not I'm afraid, Black & Decker have refused to take part in any of our reviews so far...
     
  18. Hovis

    Hovis New Member

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    I've been contemplating getting one of these things in order to do some emergency modifications to the case of my dying old laptop, but I already own pliers, a hammer and a hacksaw. So not sure if I need one...
     
  19. Xir

    Xir Well-Known Member

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    You meant to say, they didn't offer you one for free? ;)

    Anyway, as it seems to come down to the quality of cutting disks...how about including an article about after-market cutting disk into this fine list of rotary tools articles?
     
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