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Windows Secure Erase SSD?

Discussion in 'Software' started by modd1uk, 9 Dec 2018.

  1. modd1uk

    modd1uk Well-Known Member

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    Anybody recommend anything that won't kill the drive? I've a few m.2 SATA drives I've pulled from systems I wall get shut of but I'd like to make sure there's nothing on them before they go.
     
  2. yuusou

    yuusou Well-Known Member

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    Many SSDs have a secure erase built into them that can be triggered through some CLI magic on linux.
     
  3. Zoon

    Zoon Hunting Wabbits since the 80s

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    So what I did to ghetto this recently was

    1. Delete my useful files and then Chuck a huge pile of junk data (think Word docs full of Lorem Ipso) so it’s almost full
    2. Encrypt in bitlocker with a ridiculously long key
    3. Clean and re-partition the disk with diskpart after and leave a blank drive

    Even if someone does recover partitions they will be bit locker encrypted. Even if someone cracks that you’ve overwritten the whole drive with Lorem Ipso.

    I had some drives that had zero data on of consequence just like operating system but zero personal data so just did steps 2 and 3 with them.
     
  4. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    There's ATA Secure Erase, which sets all cells to empty; there's ATA Enhanced Secure Erase, which does pattern-overwriting first. You can do it via hdparm pretty easily, or via Parted Magic even easier.
    Because of the way SSDs work - i.e. when you write data to Block 1 then write something else to "Block 1" it's not actually guaranteed to be the same block - this isn't recommended, and doubly so because it doesn't properly zero the flash cells (yes, even Step 3). Sure, you can do it as an initial make-me-feel-better process, but you need Step 4: Issue ATA Secure Erase Command to both properly wipe the drive and to restore factory performance.
     
  5. Zoon

    Zoon Hunting Wabbits since the 80s

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    The SSD I was wiping simply had game installers on, and it was 90% full already ... I just encrypted it and then blatted the partitions. The only disks I had real data on were spinners and they went through shred for a week and a half before I let them go :)
     

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