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Windows Some screenshots from FSX I did

Discussion in 'Gaming' started by j4mi3, 24 Apr 2012.

  1. j4mi3

    j4mi3 New Member

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  2. j4mi3

    j4mi3 New Member

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  3. lilgoth89

    lilgoth89 Captin Calliope

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    very nice, o enjoy flight simulator X...
    id love to be a pilot one day, but ive heard getting a licence is harder than finding unicorn droppings
    so im resinged to fsx and and getting the a flight sim yoke
     
  4. j4mi3

    j4mi3 New Member

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    going for my ppl as we speak. Then I need to raise funds for a commercial license.

    I think getting your license as all to do with passion. You need to want to do it, so you will want to be knowledgeable and ace your exams and such.

    I originally wanted to be in the raf, but of course you need perfect vision, and ideally a degree in a subject such as engineering, maths, or physics. Or at least A levels in science subjects and maths, which I didn't have.

    But in terms of commercial piloting, I a lot of it is down to if you can afford it :/
     
  5. lilgoth89

    lilgoth89 Captin Calliope

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    how much are the licenes ??
    and are there any requirements to starting your licences ??
    flying is fun and helps me to relax somewhat, but ive never really had any idea on where to start on becoming a pilot
    although i was told that pilot schools dont take autistic students...do you know if thats true ?
     
  6. mucgoo

    mucgoo Well-Known Member

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    I believe you'll be looking at least £100,000.
     
  7. Sloth

    Sloth #yolo #swag

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    I'd considered getting a pilot's license a few years ago, and still would like to at some point in my life. In the US getting a private license isn't as bad, the local airport runs a class which starts in a classroom setting then progresses to practical flight exams using their planes. It's a few thousand dollars for the class but you don't get enough hours flying to actually get your license, you'll have to rent a plane a few times after to get enough flight time for your license but it's still not an ungodly amount of money.

    Never heard anything about not taking autistic students, they're likely just worried that it may lead to issues which would prevent you from keeping up with the class as it likely isn't very flexible. As long as you're confident that it won't be a problem all you'd have to do is say so I'd assume.
     
    Last edited: 24 Apr 2012
  8. dead beat

    dead beat Rippin six 4 life

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    The First Officer course at Oxford Aviation Aacademy is £86,000

    Nice screenshots btw.
     
  9. j4mi3

    j4mi3 New Member

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    You will probably be able to get your ppl if you have autism, you might not be able to get a ATPL


    PPL costs approx 9k, more than this if you require more lessons than the minimum amount (45hrs, at about £180/hr + books + membership to clubs etc)

    ATPL integrated (all in one) costs about £80k, and you need to supply the money up front. The schools often offer some kind of loan scheme, which will obviously incur interest. You get about 10 years to pay it back. You also need to take into account accomodation, unless you live very near to wherever you are training, and therefore food expenses as well as other stuff.

    It is VERY risky to take out an 80k loan. You are more than f*cked if you can't get a job for whatever reason after 10 yrs, which if your results in the exams aren't amazing, it might do.

    The other option is modular training, where you pay for each exam you take. about 20/30k per time.

    This is what i plan to do

    oh also you need a night rating for modular ATPL which is about another 1.5k i think, and can be added to your ppl

    dead beat knows his stuff
     
  10. Dewi

    Dewi New Member

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    One of the reasons I'm building an IvyBridge rig next week is to finally play FSX as it should be played. I've been dreaming of flying without blurries for far too long!!!

    Just to reiterate what others have said on the autism front. Austic Spectrum Disorders cover everything from dyslexia to those who are unable to function and communicate on any level and even in colloquial terms there is a world of difference between a person with mild Aspergers Syndrome who functions in the workplace without any of their colleagues knowing about their diagnosis and someone who require lifetime care in e community.

    And because of that range of difference, it is not legal for someone to be barred from anything on the basis of them having an ASD. I work in a job thats exempted from elements of the Disibility Discrimination Act and that states on the applications paperwork that an ASD is one of the criteria that can lead to a application being turned down. And yet I line manage someone in my organisation who declared their Aspergers and was still employed; because they were eminently qualified to do the job in question

    What they can do is fail you on the medical, if the condition impairs you from doing the job to a satisfactory level. The analogy is someone attempting to pass their driving test and who has catteracts. The fact they have degrading eyesight isn't the reason they won't pass the test; it's because they're can't read the number plate at whatever distance it is at the beginning of the test. Likewise, it's not whether your Aspergers, ADHD or traditionally Autistic, it's whether you can pass all of their tests and medicals to their satisfaction.

    What I'm saying is, don't let a label and other peoples preconceptions of Autism define what you apply for. Apply for the jobs you want to apply for and do the same tests as the next person. If your one of the best candidates and you meet the criteria; then you'll be taken on!
     
  11. Acanuck

    Acanuck New Member

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    Great screenshots!

    I thought I would also add some info for those interested about going all the way to commercial flying, particularly for lilgoth89. People seem to think that you have to be extremely fit and have perfect vision to qualify for a Class 1 medical certificate required for commercial operations. This is simply not true. As long as your vision can be corrected, have acceptable hearing and no diabetes chances are you'll pass (within reason). With regards to autism, it can get very complicated. I have heard of cadets going all the way to ATPL (Airline Transport Pilot License) with mild autism and even mild colour blindness. The degree of autism is very important and if the Civil Aviation Authority find any reason why it might prevent safe operation of aircraft then they will not issue you with a class 1. Your best bet is to visit a specialist CAA examiner, because everyone is different and there's no guarantee that you will or not be able to fly.

    For a Private Pilot License, only a class 2 medical is required. It is a lot less strict and you may find that mild autism is not an issue. Once again my best advice for lilgoth89 is give it a shot! Consult a specialist at the CAA, you have nothing to lose.

    Finance is a problem for many aspiring pilots but the loans are there and available. The quoted prices of ~£80k are correct excluding living costs. If you apply to one of the reputable flying schools, getting a loan (for the full amount with expenses) with a partner bank is not a problem as long as a house (in the UK) can be secured with it.

    Quick note on modular training. It sounds great: study around work, work at own pace and cheaper! My personal opinion is it's more risky because airlines will not choose a modular student over an integrated student with a frozen ATPL (under 1500hrs). Whilst it might work out to be cheaper, an integrated course lasts 18 months or less and you will start earning money a year, perhaps 2 years or more before a modular student. Even in some cases modular is ever more expensive as the training is dragged over a long period of time. Going for an integrated course even with a PPL is still a good idea.

    I know this isn't exactly the right place to talk about this but I felt the urge to share and I hope there was some useful information for those perhaps thinking of moving from FSX to the real thing!
     
    Last edited: 22 Jun 2012

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