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A/V Sound Card for capturing audio off of Vinyl

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Ligoman17, 19 Apr 2005.

  1. Ligoman17

    Ligoman17 New Member

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    So here's what I'm trying to do: I have a bunch of music on vinyl that I would like to put on my PC in mp3 format. I was wondering if it would be possible to route the audio out from my record player into a sound card on my PC and use some recording software "upload" the songs to my PC. (It should be obvious by now that I know absolutely nothing about recording. :D ) What would you experts reccommend for an entry level sound card with software that can be used for this application? I've started doing some research myself and found the E-MU 1212 sound card. Is this a good choice? I should also add that I use this same computer for listening to music and playing games such as half life 2 so it needs to be able to do that as well as interface with my logitech z640 speakers (5.1 setup). Thanks for any help!
     
  2. dom_

    dom_ --->

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    use any sound card you want aslong as it has an input.

    the signal from the deck needs to be amplified first though through a phono stage.
    so get you hands on one of these (pro-ject make a good value one for about £50)
     
  3. Ligoman17

    Ligoman17 New Member

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    Thanks for the reply.

    Any information on software I should be looking for to caputre the audio from the record player? Cheaper = better obviously :thumb:
     
  4. bennifer

    bennifer New Member

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    Get a creative card that has a line in input. to be honest whatever you have now almost certainly has a line-in input!

    Basically where the deck normally plugs into the amp with the 2 red/white phono leads, you get a convertor lead that takes it into one 3.5mm headphone type jack - this goes into your linein. Then (on creative cards this software is bundled) you use something like creative wavestudio (think thats what its called) and set it to record from line in and BAM there it is and if i remember correnctly from when my dad converted old storybook tapes the same program can encode into mp3s :)

    Job done :)
     
  5. Ligoman17

    Ligoman17 New Member

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    Great info!

    I'll get on it asap :rock:
     
  6. dom_

    dom_ --->

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    that wont work very well. the deck signal is extremly weak hence it needs extra amplification in the form of a phono stage which is just a specialist pre amp.
    you can get them cheaply.

    what he said about leads is correctish, the deck should have phono leads and an earthing lead. connect them to the phono stage and get a phono to 3.5mm jack to go from the soundcard. if you dont use the earthing lead you will get a nasty static build up and crackling.

    if you dont use a phono stage you will have to use the soundcard to amplify the signal more than it can without MASSIVE distortion.


    as for software i hear wavelab is the best for doing it at a good bit rate/sampling frequency etc. but it is not cheap at all.
     
  7. bennifer

    bennifer New Member

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    Im assuming he's already got a phono preamp as its already plugged into a hifi amp... unless its a special/old amp with record deck facilities built in.

    Whatever.

    Record player -> Preamp ("stage") -> phono-3.5plug -> Line-in on soundcard -> recording software.
     
  8. antiHero

    antiHero ReliXmas time!

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    think the best thing to do would be buying Steinberg Clean. its a recording program and aftereffect. its made to clean up vinyl sound and if you spend a couple of bucks more you get a phono preamp for your turntable. got this setup in my studio and have to say it makes wonders on the sound. if you can spend more money get an emu soundcard. they are great.

    edit: check here
    http://www.pcplus.co.uk/reviews/def...leid=5155&subsectionid=373&subsubsectionid=54
     
  9. dom_

    dom_ --->

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    you would be better cleaning the vinyl in a submersive brush system than using that program, unless we are talking heavy scratches.

    as when it removes a crackle (partially) it also removes some info from the soundwave. this is because the program finds a sharp spike (which could be part of the music) and it tries to work out how the soundwave should act without the spike. which is not what you want.

    clean vinyl on a half decent deck wont have background noise.
     
  10. Tek Heathen

    Tek Heathen New Member

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    I presume you have a deck and amp to play the records, so it's just a matter of taking the line out from the amp to the line in of the sound card. The quality of the recording depends on the source mostly so if the deck and amp are up to it the only other thing to cover is clean the disks carefully.
    Software is often a matter of personal taste, I found Polderbitts sound recorder good and it's available free unrestricted for 14 days trial, do ya think you could get all the records done that quick?.
     

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