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Other Street photography and your rights

Discussion in 'Photography, Art & Design' started by smc8788, 22 Jul 2011.

  1. smc8788

    smc8788 Multimodder

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    I thought this video was quite interesting as I often see a lot of misconceptions about the law regarding photographers and what they are/aren't allowed to take photos of, and a lot of the security guards filmed in this video were trying it on with them. I have to say that I have never been stopped by anyone while I've been taking photos (though I think it's more of a problem in London than elsewhere in the UK), however, from what I've heard the police aren't always as understanding as they are in this video when it comes to photographers and I've heard numerous occasions of the deleting/seizing photographs. I wonder whether they're becoming more understanding and knowledgeable about the law or if these were just particularly good examples as they knew they were being filmed?

     
    LennyRhys likes this.
  2. Threefiguremini

    Threefiguremini What's a Dremel?

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    Ah brilliant video! Really interesting. Good advert for the police involved too.
     
  3. stonedsurd

    stonedsurd Is a cackling Yuletide Belgian

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    I liked this.

    Does anyone know if there's a similar resource for photography in the USA? I've had lots of my pictures deleted at airshows and that's pretty upsetting.

    EDIT: The guy in the pink sweater who was getting it from the grey-suited chaps has the same backpack as I do! Sorry, random excitement :p
     
    Last edited: 22 Jul 2011
  4. LennyRhys

    LennyRhys Oink!

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    Brilliant video. Whilst photographers should be permitted to take pictures freely in public, it's worth mentioning that the use of the resulting images can indeed be policed very strictly - eg trademarks, identifiable persons (model releases etc).

    I haven't had any trouble yet as a photographer, but I'm not holding my breath :D
     
  5. Fod

    Fod what is the cheesecake?

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    Yup. In fact many buildings also require release forms.
     
  6. stuartwood89

    stuartwood89 Please... Just call me Stu.

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    But if the exterior of the building can be viewed by anyone who happens to be close to it, then I don't understand what the problem is taking photos.
     
  7. Fod

    Fod what is the cheesecake?

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    There is no problem. The problem arises when you then make money off the photo by selling it. That is essentially violating a copyright the owners/builders of the structure have. T use images of buildings in commercial work, you need a release.
     
  8. longweight

    longweight Possibly Longbeard.

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    Excellent police!
     
  9. CrapBag

    CrapBag Multimodder

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    Very interesting.

    As for the terroism angle, surely terroists aren't gonna be sitting there with a f..k off great lense making themselves rather obvious.

    Their gonna have some sort of covert arrangment with a camera in a holdal or even pretending to use a mobile phone while in fact taking pictures or filming with it.

    A little common sense from the security guards wins over everytime :)
     
  10. stonedsurd

    stonedsurd Is a cackling Yuletide Belgian

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    You forgetr, a terrorist may well pretend to be a photographer on pubic space. These videos have shown just how easy it is.

    That said, I'd rather live free with the chance that some nutjob might get up to shenanigans than live in a goddamn police state, so I like this.

    LA cops are nice. I get stopped a lot but they once I tell them that I'm just weird and like taking pictures at 4am, they shrug and leave me alone. One of them even gave me a lift home once.
     
    Last edited: 25 Jul 2011
  11. mike_dowler

    mike_dowler What's a Dremel?

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    Just to clear up any confusion, s.62 of the UK Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 is quite clear (http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1988/48/section/62). Buildings *can* have copyright, but you don't infringe by taking photos (even for commercial purposes) *if* the building is in a public place.

    And there is never a legal requirement for a release form. They are just there to cover your back in case of a dispute later.

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  12. Fod

    Fod what is the cheesecake?

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    I'm pretty sure you can be sued for using an image of a famous building commercially without a signed release form. This is coming from a friend of mine who is a professional photojournalist.
     
  13. LennyRhys

    LennyRhys Oink!

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    Mike is right - obtaining a release form doesn't immunise you against legal action, but it would stand you in good stead should you find yourself in any sort of trouble.

    This is what I found:

    Taken from Beyond the Lens: Rights, Ethics, and Business Practice in Professional Photography

    And yes, that helpful excerpt is itself an infringement of copyright LOL :D
     
  14. Tim S

    Tim S OG

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    It's fine to quote a small amount with attribution. Quoting the whole article or taking significant portions of an article without attribution is considered an infringement of copyright :)
     
  15. 3lusive

    3lusive Minimodder

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    Exactly, or every student in the world would be serial infringers! Would come under fair use (or fair dealing in the UK I think)
     
  16. LennyRhys

    LennyRhys Oink!

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    That's fine then - it was worth my while linking the source :D
     
  17. MazzaB

    MazzaB What's a Dremel?

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    Worth noting if anyone including a police officer takes your gear off you in a public place and deletes your photos that may give you grounds for criminal damage or civil damages, so point that out to them before they do and they may well pause!

    You could just take the card out and run a rescue job on it later......
     

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