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The Coronavirus Thread

Discussion in 'Serious' started by d_stilgar, 13 Mar 2020.

  1. yodasarmpit

    yodasarmpit Modder

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    It’s above the CBI rate, and 1% more than the vast majority of non public sector employees can expect this year.
    There will be great many that find themselves out f work, and many more who will likely see no pay increase at all.
    Let’s not forget that nursing salaries have increased by roughly 12% over the last 3 years - again you won’t find that in the private sector.
     
  2. Byron C

    Byron C Ripping a line of speed off a sh**-encrusted bog

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    I'm sure Nexxo or Gareth will come along soon enough and discuss the public sector pay side of things, but I wanted to pick up on this point in particular:

    I work in the private sector. My pay rise for 2021 was 6%. In the year and a half since I started this job, my annual salary has gone up by a hair under 16%. If you account for my bonus and benefits then it's actually a 32% increase.

    I am very well aware that I am... well, not lucky, because luck didn't get me this role and it didn't get me my last one either. I am very well aware that I am in a fortunate position and that there are many many people going through pay cuts, reductions in hours, redundancies, etc. But that's besides the point: to assert flat-out that you won't find a 12% pay rise over a 3-year period in the private sector is simply incorrect. Sure it might not be common, not going to disagree with that, but I'm not even in what you'd consider a "lucrative industry" - I'm a bloody Data Engineer who works for a website.
     
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  3. Goatee

    Goatee Multimodder

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    Got to agree here, comparing the private vs public sector is pretty pointless, however, if your going to do it then what about also taking into account car allowances, share save schemes, restricted stock awards / options and bonus awards.

    What's being offered is pitiful, end of.
     
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  4. fix-the-spade

    fix-the-spade Multimodder

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    I dunno, my pay's gone up almost 40% since 2015, it went up 2% last year and this year I got full bonus regardless of actual performance (which was way short of 2020's target). I'm in private healthcare though, so I'm one of those parasites bleeding the NHS dry on name your price and the taxpayer will cover it* type deals. In the same time period Nurses have had that 12% pay rise, but it's still equates to less buying power than they had in 2010 thanks to the however many years pay freeze combined with inflation.

    It's barely three months since MP's announced their 2021 pay rise would be limited to under £3000 like they were making some huge sacrifice for the good of all. That's still 3.7% for people taking £81k a year. Nurses are getting offered £180-210ish per year after tax. Combine that with Boris spending millions redecorating and the year nurses have just endured and the 1% looks like a slap in the face to me. If the Gov's short of cash perhaps they should order Track'n'trace and a few of their other failed pop-up contractors to hand those billions back.


    *Not literaly, but reading bids vs what services acutally cost it can feel that way sometimes.
     
  5. yodasarmpit

    yodasarmpit Modder

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    Then compare public sector pensions, not as good now, but way better than private.

    I’m not saying the NHS guys have it great, but it’s being overplayed in the media - very few will be seeing a bumper pay rise this year.
     
  6. Goatee

    Goatee Multimodder

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    I have limited understanding of NHS (or other public service pension schemes) but I believe for a lot of people they aren't as lucrative as they used to be @Nexxo may be able to shed light here. This is especially true when they are also based on a salary that isn't anywhere near as high as the private sector, what's the point of a "gold plated" pension if its based on tuppence and a turnip?
     
  7. adidan

    adidan Guesswork is still work

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    I think any recent increases are misleading.

    A full fact response to Hancock's claims in 2020 https://fullfact.org/health/nurse-pay-may-2020/

    It's what Tories always do. Massive cuts then give a little back later on so it looks like they're investing
     
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  8. rollo

    rollo Modder

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    1% is still more than my last pay rise was. Basically 0 I got a payment (taxable naturally) as I have hit band maximum and was no increase in my band last year.

    If I work it out Inflation in the last 10 years is on or near 22% give or take

    In that time I have been given around a 10% total pay increase Assuming I was not at or on the band maximum for my Job grade at the time.

    So in affect I am at least 12% worse off than I was in 2010.

    NHS get all the publicity but every single Civil Service department has been taking these hits for the last decade.
     
  9. bawjaws

    bawjaws Multimodder

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    Aye, and what happened to salaries in the years before that? Nurses have had a real-terms pay cut since 2010.
    [​IMG]
     
  10. Mr_Mistoffelees

    Mr_Mistoffelees The Bit-Tech Cat. New Improved Version.

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    Nhs staff, over the last year, have worked very hard, over very long hours, mentally as well as physically exhausting. Their work places them at very high risk of catching a nasty and potentially lethal disease and, they do it to keep us all well.

    They bloody well deserve a decent rise.
     
  11. Anfield

    Anfield Multimodder

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    To be fair, the abuse of outsourcing for the purpose of excluding workers from pay rises, promotions, bonus schemes, pensions etc has also started to infest government related jobs.
    So anyone who can still get something does have every reason to demand even more because it may well be the last time they get an opportunity to ask for anything.
     
  12. Ending Credits

    Ending Credits Bunned

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    To be honest, in general terms it makes sense given the economic climate, especially when you consider that NHS staff are less likely to be hurting for cash. But it comes across as pretty mean spirited, and seems a bit unjustifiable given there hasn't really been a big change to the budget as far as I can see.

    If the Tories were smart they'd chuck a decent pay-rise their way and label it a Brexit Dividend.
     
  13. fix-the-spade

    fix-the-spade Multimodder

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    If the Tories were smart they would have paid the 2.1% like Sunak announced in The Commons during the ancient times of November 2020. Compared to the Furlough borrowing it's a drop in the bucket.

    Instead, well.
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-56260038
    They seem to think, "We were going to, we intended to, we budgeted for it, we announced it, but we've changed our minds, you're already paid plenty, get back to work," is somehow a defensible position.
     
  14. Nexxo

    Nexxo * Prefab Sprout – The King of Rock 'n' Roll

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    Only the very lowest pay bands. The higher ones had more like a 4.4% rise and most only a 1.65% one. The 2.1% rise promised.to all staff this year has now been reduced to 1%.

    Also: NHS pay has fallen behind inflation since 2010 - Full Fact

    [​IMG]

    Chart of the week: NHS staff pay and the cost of living | The Nuffield Trust
     
    Last edited: 10 Mar 2021
  15. yodasarmpit

    yodasarmpit Modder

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    I’m not sure if this is true, but don’t (or didn’t) NHS staff get a default increase year on year based in tenure - over and above any pay rise?

    I think that might have changed, but sure I’d heard/read that somewhere on the past.


    We would all like to be fairly rewarded for our work, and would never turn down a decent payrise. That being said, I think we all need to be mindful (and realistic) of the current situation and the impact it has had on our economy, I'm not anticipating an above inflation increase this year - the company I work for has taken a financial hit due to Covid - much like the government.
     
  16. Arboreal

    Arboreal Keeper of the Electric Currants

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    Reading a vaccination thread on another non related forum, someone has suggested that you take Paracetamol and Ibuprofen starting 24 hrs before your jab...
    That's a bit more pre emptive than @Vault-Tec was suggesting, getting the Paracetamols in as soon as you've had it.
     
  17. Nexxo

    Nexxo * Prefab Sprout – The King of Rock 'n' Roll

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    We used to go up spine points within the band every year, which came down to a 1.4%-ish pay increment on average. But there were about 6-7 spine points within a band and once you hit the top, there were no more increments. The only way to keep progressing was to find a new, higher-banded post. I was at the top of my band for 5 years before I got a higher-banded post, and I'm again on the highest spine point now so no more increments.

    With the 2020 pay rise, spine points have been restructured. Now there are 7-8 spine points and you have to be in post for 5 years (progress through 5 spine points) before you start getting any pay increment. Also your progression through the spine points is not automatic anymore, but dependent on annual performance reviews.

    Private sector pay has kept pace with inflation since 2016 and gone 1.7% above since 2018. NHS pay has stayed 7% below it.
     
  18. Vault-Tec

    Vault-Tec Green Plastic Watering Can

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    Yup that certainly sounds like a much better plan tbh. I've got two boxes of paras now, will grab some ibuprofen from mum who has box loads.
     
  19. yodasarmpit

    yodasarmpit Modder

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    It might be worth checking, as the recommendations seem to be not to take any non prescribed medication prior to the jab.
     
  20. Arboreal

    Arboreal Keeper of the Electric Currants

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    Thanks @yodasarmpit, that was only something circumstantial that I picked up.
    I'm on anti inflammatories at the moment, so will check on the advice when I get to the point of being offered a vaccine.
    Bit too young yet for the current rolling age band!
     

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