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Think federal racism is dead? Not for my people, apparently.

Discussion in 'Serious' started by KayinBlack, 12 Dec 2014.

  1. KayinBlack

    KayinBlack Currently Rebuilding

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    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/...-americans_n_6305738.html?utm_hp_ref=politics

    I literally threw up when I read this. Then I got so mad I needed Ativan, and then I fumed more anyway.

    We are proud people, able to fight the government on equal legal footing. We're not unteachable savages barely able to hold a society together, we were a superpower before our lands were razed by people who deemed us subhuman because our skin wasn't the same color as ours.

    Are you white? Thank whoever you thank that you don't have to put up with constantly being thought of as lesser because your skin color is darker. It's no walk in the park.
     
  2. GuilleAcoustic

    GuilleAcoustic Ook ? Ook !

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    I'm white skinned but you,
    have my support bro.

    Lately, in France, the extremists scored high at the election. Generally it's just a protestation vote, but now it really became a vote of conviction.

    I'm truly disgusted at how people think about other colours, religions, sexual preferences. I don't understand the society anymore. It's like being back to the middle ages.

    Fu** it, we are all the same!
     
  3. specofdust

    specofdust Banned

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    I'm kind of confused here, what's the issue with what he said? It seems like he was claiming that native American reservations still come under US federal authority, which they quite obviously do.

    Am I reading this wrong, or am I missing something?
     
  4. fix-the-spade

    fix-the-spade Well-Known Member

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    A ward of the state doesn't have the same rights as a citizen, they're legally considered incapable and are essentially bound to their guardian(s) will and have no right to refuse or act independently of said guardians, nor do they have any right to mount legal challenges against the government (say for example, over the seizure or forced sale of property).

    Native Americans aren't wards of the US government, they're citizens, whether the guy meant that and used the wrong words or meant what he said it's still pretty unforgivable. Native Americans were considered wards of the state until sometime in the twenties or thirties and during that time they had more or less no rights, to say it's a loaded word would be an understatement and he should know that.
     
  5. specofdust

    specofdust Banned

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    Maybe he wasn't referring to the people, but rather to the regions of land under native control? We have wards in the UK which are subsets of electoral constituencies - he would be correct to say that Native American land was such. Let's be honest here, the US native American regions are not sovereign nation states.
     
  6. KayinBlack

    KayinBlack Currently Rebuilding

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    Until very recently, my people were considered to be "deficient" and needed white people to "civilize" them because they were poor "savages." We were made wards of the state because we could not be expected to understand how civilized men acted. They systematically destroyed our cultures, forcibly sterilized us, denied us citizenship, the right to vote, own land, speak our languages or practice our beliefs. They used to call it "kill the Indian to save the man." All this up until a few decades back, when they finally started giving us back control of what little parcels they left us.

    Hitler once asked the US how they could question him after the genocide of the First Peoples. His was nothing compared to how many of us died, our land raped, our culture shattered and our identities nearly gone. I can still barely speak my tribe's language, because my family tried to pass as white to avoid the stigma. You have no idea how proud I was to list my son as Seminole on his birth certificate and be free to do so. His statement would be like calling all black peoples "sambos" or "pickaninnies"-it's a loaded statement, stating that we're still not good enough. That's why it made the news, and that's why it hurt me, as I am half First Peoples. I still get called "woods ni**er" and "halfbreed" here in the closing of 2014. So now you know the context of the statement.

    I think I do pretty well to be descended from slaves. I'm finally able to hold my head up high about my heritage. I am free to practice what beliefs are left to us. I don't appreciate some honkey telling me we're too dumb to be allowed to manage our own affairs.
     
  7. rainbowbridge

    rainbowbridge Well-Known Member

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    KayinBlack most people know the native Americans as a truly beautiful naturally wise historically interesting and meaningful people of high merit.

    There is not any one here against you and your people that I can imagine and if it counts for any thing I am personally very sorry for what happened to the Native peoples of America.

    I can see and say that over the countless years many of your tribes and kind lived out full and lush lives filled with joy and passed on to the new place, in better standing than the white man understands.

    Your people knew humility, balance, and the law of nature.
    It is a known that native Americans deserve respect.

    The only wise words more I can say, as with our body's in time, so every thing changes and we must all be of courage towards the truth of all there is.

    [​IMG]
     

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