1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

News Traditional PC market continues to shrink

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by Gareth Halfacree, 11 Jul 2013.

  1. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    4 Dec 2007
    Posts:
    13,003
    Likes Received:
    2,127
  2. WarrenJ

    WarrenJ Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    14 Oct 2009
    Posts:
    2,714
    Likes Received:
    207
    i think the main issue is people don't need to upgrade as the hardware is currently outpacing the software requirements. I think there will always be a need for a workspace in the home but for casual browsing and the like a tablet will do most people.

    I expect workstations will be expensive in the coming years as mobile hardware will be in higher demand.
     
  3. B1GBUD

    B1GBUD ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ Accidentally Funny

    Joined:
    29 May 2008
    Posts:
    3,327
    Likes Received:
    415
    How does the overall drop in PC sales compare to the sales of upgrade components? As most people (certainly here on BT) looking for better performance will look at what components they can upgrade rather than buying a whole new system.
     
    Last edited: 11 Jul 2013
  4. Icy EyeG

    Icy EyeG Controlled by Eyebrow Powers™

    Joined:
    23 Jul 2007
    Posts:
    517
    Likes Received:
    3
    My whole family is postponing laptop purchases because of Windows 8, and I've been helping them getting their current laptops faster by installing Xubuntu and maxing out RAM (got some used DDR2/3 SODIMMs at bargain price a couple of months ago). In some cases I even bought new batteries. So not linking Windows 8 made them realize they didn't really needed the upgrade in the first place.

    In my case, I completely overhauled my desktop 2 years ago and I expect it to last 2 more years, at least. The only thing I wanted to upgrade was RAM, but since the prices skyrocketed I won't be buying it any time soon.
    Since my laptop is almost 4 years old, I'll probably buy a Novatech Ultrabook, once they become available with full HD screens. Since they don't come with a Windows licence (I wouldn't be using it anyway), the shipping cost is worth it, because here in Portugal is impossible to buy an ultrabook without being shoved Windows 8 down your throat, and the added cost of the license is more expensive than the shipping cost from the UK, ironically.

    So in my personal experience is a mix between not liking Windows 8 and not really needing to buy new hardware (everyone in the family gets by with minor upgrades of no more than 30-50€).
    I also think the extinction of the netbook segment is also contributing to the decline. I see many people here in Portugal going to IT stores looking for a netbook in the 300€ price range and either decide not to buy anything or end up buying an Android tablet.
     
  5. rollo

    rollo Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    16 May 2008
    Posts:
    7,700
    Likes Received:
    99
    General population does not need upgrades. Add an ssd to a core2 duo and it flys for most tasks that most do.
     
  6. Xir

    Xir Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    26 Apr 2006
    Posts:
    5,251
    Likes Received:
    88
    This, Dell and HP sell to companies that use their computers for productivity...Tablets are primarily consumption devices.
    The decline we see is primarily in the private sector, not the business sector.

    I've been looking for one, in the sub 300€ area, there's none left. :grr:
     
  7. Icy EyeG

    Icy EyeG Controlled by Eyebrow Powers™

    Joined:
    23 Jul 2007
    Posts:
    517
    Likes Received:
    3
    Well, you can always try to find an Asus X201E online.
     
  8. DC74

    DC74 Doh!

    Joined:
    4 Jan 2011
    Posts:
    71
    Likes Received:
    2
    I agree with some of the comments made, technology is outstripping software development and as such people don't need to upgrade as frequently. That said Intel's recent Haswell CPU's are barely faster than Sandybridge of a few years ago, not fast enough to warrant the expense of rebuilding a system.

    Couple this with the fact that Microsoft's disastrous Windows 8 and it's apparent reworks have harmed new PC sales. All of the people I know who use their PC's at home for Gaming/streaming/video encoding and managing their lives, have said they tried Windows 8 and found it horrible to use and that the tile-touch screen interface just isn't appropriate for Desktops. As an Operating System it would be fine but it seems a step too far to force users to use an interface that just wasn't suitable. Perhaps Microsoft should have realised this instead of being arrogant and trying to dictate the path of evolution.

    Me and my partner are buying new laptops in the next few weeks and were shopping in town, saw the ones liked and were put off by the fact they were using Windows 8, but encouraged by the shop assistant that said he could order them in with Windows 7 on instead. If shops are doing this then perhaps Microsoft should take note.
     
  9. impar

    impar Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    24 Nov 2006
    Posts:
    3,101
    Likes Received:
    41
    Greetings!

    Windows 8 doesnt help PC sales, sure. But it can become usable with some tweaks. We shouldnt need to do them, but Microsoft is just stubborn to not include UI options.

    Funny thing is that if Microsoft listensed to consumers and offered a more consensual W8 experience it would help increase W8 usage share in this critical point in time where XP is losing support in less than a year. Instead of migrating to W7, W8 would be the chosen one.

    PS:
    You noticed that too?
     
  10. Corky42

    Corky42 Where's walle?

    Joined:
    30 Oct 2012
    Posts:
    9,444
    Likes Received:
    338
    The problem is you average Jo consumer who buys new PC's because they don't know how to upgrade their existing one probably don't know they can tweak 8 to their needs.

    I to would be interested as B1GBUD said how the decline in PC sales compares to sales in upgrade components.
    Is it just your average Jo switching to tablets and such because they don't see the reason to replace that box sitting under the desk ?
     
    Last edited: 11 Jul 2013
  11. impar

    impar Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    24 Nov 2006
    Posts:
    3,101
    Likes Received:
    41
    Greetings!
    Not arguing there. Sick and tired of geting calls to "fix" W8 UI.
    They change to what they know. They most have an android phone, transition is easy.
     
  12. LordPyrinc

    LordPyrinc Legomaniac

    Joined:
    7 Mar 2008
    Posts:
    596
    Likes Received:
    5
    If you bought a decent dual or quad core processor 5 years ago, its still a very capable machine. My current MOBO and processor are 3.5 years old, but I really don't see changing either out anytime soon. I'd get a better performance boost by swapping out my 10,000 rpm VelociRaptors for SSDs. Downside is that I don't have USB 3.0 support on the MOBO, but I can live without that for now. I could always OC my processor, but what would that give me? Probably nothing noticeable.

    Only updates I've done in the last 3.5 years was to move everything to a new case, new GPUs, and I swapped out the 3x2 GB RAM sticks for 2x8 RAM sticks. Still same HDs (no reformatting as of yet since Windows 7 still running great), same PSU, and Blu-Ray drive.

    On the other hand, my OTS HP Pavilion Elite, 6 or 7 years old, is plenty capable for most casual users and could even be a decent gaming rig with the right GPU slapped in there. It's got an upgraded PSU and an 8800 GT in there now as it is.
     
  13. Phil Rhodes

    Phil Rhodes Hypernobber

    Joined:
    27 Jul 2006
    Posts:
    1,415
    Likes Received:
    10
    Sigh. I was an Amiga user, I've been here before :(
     
  14. DriftCarl

    DriftCarl Member

    Joined:
    2 Nov 2004
    Posts:
    601
    Likes Received:
    12
    For home users, upgrading from a mechanical drive to an SSD would seem like they got a brand new PC. This is what I am planning to do to my parents computer soon.
    For enthusiastic gamers, would it be fair to say most buy the components and build it themselves? I certainly do, and just bought a new setup last week.
     
  15. Yaka

    Yaka Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    26 Jun 2005
    Posts:
    1,541
    Likes Received:
    112
    This!

    But I also think games play thier part in the. Decline as well there's not really been a killer pc only game that shifts as much copies as say a popular console game does these days.
     
  16. Phil Rhodes

    Phil Rhodes Hypernobber

    Joined:
    27 Jul 2006
    Posts:
    1,415
    Likes Received:
    10
    The only upside is that PCs are - for now - used for a lot of other things. The issue being, I suppose, that most of the office stuff doesn't need anything like the level of hardware that is often used to run it, as has been mentioned previously. Eventually the world will realise that much lower powered gear (be it intel, arm, windows, droid, etc) will do fine.

    Even then there will still be significant workstation and server tasks that will need the big iron, but if that's the case it's going to get a lot more expensive.

    Ultimately I don't care what I run, I need it to do work, but if the top end gets a lot more pricey because there are no longer games pushing the boundaries, that's really a problem.
     
  17. Guest-16

    Guest-16 Guest

    It's two fold.

    1) As long as there is hardware being made for it, people will buy it. You don't get thousands of tech sites drawing hundreds of thousands to millions of readers, each, globally, if there isn't interest in spending money and using PCs. The demand is there, it's just not on the scale as before.

    2) The drops are in the budget and home segments. Business' and power users are still upgrading but like said most people at home are avoiding Win 8 or opting for tablets or smartphones. Even tablet and smartphone uptake has slowed though, with Gartner saying high-end phones will only grow 35% in the next year, but mainstream will increase 600+%. All those people with old notebooks/EeePCs will swap them out for budget smartphones and still be able to read the net/answer email/watch cat videos.

    So, while it suits some agendas in media/tech companies to shout about post-PC, it's not going to be eradicated entirely. There will be an inevitable drop but to an eventual plateau that serves business, professionals and power users. As long as you keep vocal and keep buying, they will of course cater to you. Likewise, if people keep saying "I'll wait for next gen" there is less likely to be one, because evaluations on sales figures are on each generation. No one has a duty to keep providing one market with hardware and if they see less people buying then they'll shift the R&D budget elsewhere.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: 12 Jul 2013
  18. Xir

    Xir Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    26 Apr 2006
    Posts:
    5,251
    Likes Received:
    88
    I'm mostly with you there, but for the "answer email" part.
    I've been using my Smartphone a lot to answer emails the last few weeks (due to not having a PC close) and copy-pasteing and typing are so frustrating I could fling it out the window with the window closed. :grr:

    *pet peeve: trying to mark the text to be copied, and it starts scrolling and can't be stopped. :duh:
     
  19. Xir

    Xir Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    26 Apr 2006
    Posts:
    5,251
    Likes Received:
    88
    Not bad, not bad...
    Glossy display though. Hmmm I'll need to look into this one, Thx for the Tip!:thumb:
     
  20. Guest-16

    Guest-16 Guest

    True. I find most people use email like they do whatsapp or text message through phones. The quality of English will travel even further south until any kind of interpersonal message will consist of random mashes of roughly the right letters without even spaces.
     

Share This Page