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News Ubisoft: "We have an anti-piracy plan"

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by CardJoe, 28 Jul 2009.

  1. Lepermessiah

    Lepermessiah New Member

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    LOL, you need a tinfoil hat. Please, a quick workaround would quickly be found, if that happened a revoke tool, or community fix would be just around the corner. Revoke tools are common now, even just after a game gets older. People are so paranoid. Plus, back up your games.
     
  2. ZERO <ibis>

    ZERO <ibis> Member

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    We here have a great system. Every time you buy one of our amazing products my own cousin Vinny will come over and give you a free chair! Now you can not get out of the chair but it is very comfortable. Every Friday he will be buy to collect and if you are out of the chair somehow we will just give you a little wack. So see everything is bon, kapesh...
     
    azrael- likes this.
  3. Elton

    Elton Officially a Whisky Nerd

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    I'm just not fond of DRM if only because it installs thing I don't know about..Just imagine, if someone was smart enough to figure a way to steal data that way....

    Yeah.....
     
  4. binary101

    binary101 New Member

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    DRM software didn't really exist until 2002-2003, just because my cars been running fine for the last 5 years doesn't mean that it wont ever breakdown.

    What kind of backup did you have in mind?
    Burning the DVD?, Making an image? cause that stopped working about 5 years ago...
     
  5. leslie

    leslie Just me!

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    To those who say DRM isn't evil...

    Remember that next time the manufacturer of that game or music"cd" you "bought" goes out of business and it no longer works. DRM means you are renting, you don't own whatever it is you bought. They can take it away from you at any moment. If you crack it to defeat this, you are just as guilty as a pirate in the eyes of the law. Funny since pirates don't have that issue. They don't pay for it and have MORE rights than you do for having paid for it.

    I'm not justifying piracy, just stating the facts.
    You pay more for a system that revokes your rights. There is no benefit of DRM to a legitimate consumer. None. It also does nothing to stop pirates. And if you read the quote below, you will see that it will not even stop legitimate users when they use said DRM for it's intended purpose.



    If your game needs online activation, backing it up is irrelevant. It's done. Period. Same with music that has drm.

    "The community?" Give me a break. Yes, you can crack it, and make it work again, which is what "the community" will do, but there is one problem, you are now a pirate and a criminal. It is illegal to circumvent that system so you just became the very thing you fought against.

    As mentioned this has happened in the past. The government should pass a law that forces companies using drm to sell you a lease agreement. not ownership rights. That would at least differentiate the fact that you are buying something with DRM as opposed to without.
     
    impar likes this.
  6. AshT

    AshT Custom User Title

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    I'm guessing you've bought music from a business that has gone out of business?

    They need to find a way to stop second hand sales and piracy and give us the much anticipated knock-on effect of reduced prices. THEN if the publishers don't reduce prices, we can fire bomb their offices and cry about DRM restricting our human rights.
     
  7. leslie

    leslie Just me!

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    My father had Napster (the legal one) for a while, and watched DRM rights revoked quite often. One week a song was available, the next it wasn't. He "bought" a song, then the artist revoked the license. He felt as many here do, "it won't happen to me"... Well, it did. He didn't make that mistake again.


    Yep.. DRM never happens...
    Amazon did it the other day to thousands of books. Which ironically, "1984" was one of them.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/27/technology/companies/27amazon.html?_r=1&partner=rss&emc=rss



    Even if they do drop it and reduce prices, they wouldn't drop. They would come up with something else to claim is inflating the cost. You are used to the cost, so why should they change it,. In fact, odds are they would INCREASE it, calling no DRM a feature.

    Oh wait, they already did this... :rolleyes:
     
  8. AshT

    AshT Custom User Title

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    I've got Steam and iTunes and they won't be going anywhere.

    I am starting to wonder what kind of effect On Demand gaming will have on Steam, but fingers crossed Steam has that covered.
     
  9. leslie

    leslie Just me!

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    And the Titanic was unsinkable, AIG, GM, and Chrysler were too big to fail.

    If music companies decide to pull their interests in Itunes, it's dead, and they could force Apple to kill all songs from them.

    Same can happen to Steam. EA and others could say"we are done" and yank all of their stuff. Leaving only Valve, which is fine, except that Valve is just as vulnerable as anyone else.
     
  10. DXR_13KE

    DXR_13KE BananaModder

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    If that happened then they would have a s*it storm in their hands...
     
  11. AstralWanderer

    AstralWanderer New Member

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    If you mean the chances of Valve or Apple going bust in the next 5 years are low, then you're probably right.

    However both systems are very much under the thumb of the companies running them and that includes being able to force new features or changes on users. Apple can (and has) altered the number of permitted copies, so they could (if they wanted more revenue) add a system of forced rental. Or add "purchase by default" (like book/film clubs, where you automatically receive and are charged for the "xxx of the Month" unless you specifically decline it). Or use "in-your-face" advertising (like Gator and similar adware), etc.

    Those who've been careful to purchase only DRM-free MP3s (at extra cost) from iTunes could ditch it if any such stunt was pulled but anyone else would have to grin and bear it (unless their collection was small enough to make workarounds feasible).

    Current DRM systems are not (and probably never have been) about stopping piracy (online activation is not intrinsically any harder to disable than a media check) but about controlling usage and users. It would be naive not to expect a publisher to use this to extract money directly at some point (as opposed to just indirectly by killing off second-hand sales).
     
  12. AshT

    AshT Custom User Title

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    But you can record your purchases to CD ... ? And always re-rip them if need be ... ? Should Apple fail.
     
  13. DragunovHUN

    DragunovHUN I want to change my name but I also don't

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    I don't mind DRM as long as it doesn't limit me to a certain number of installs.

    However i dont see its point. Even the strongest DRM they can throw at the pirates gets cracked on the release day, if not sooner so why not quit bugging the legit customer and just release the goddamn game? gog.com is a good example. Steam is a good example.

    Okay so Steam has DRM, but the service, the games and the deals (on Valve games at least) are so good that even some of my hardcore pirate friends buy stuff there.

    And what do they think they'd achieve with stopping pirating ANYWAYS? If they didn't buy games before they won't start now.
     
  14. AstralWanderer

    AstralWanderer New Member

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    When you do that, you lose the metadata (track name, artist details, etc) and have to enter it manually when ripping the CDs back to MP3s/OGGs. Not a huge problem with a small collection - but impractical for those with hundreds of tracks.
     
  15. AshT

    AshT Custom User Title

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    There is an option to record an MP3 CD, is that no good?
     
  16. AstralWanderer

    AstralWanderer New Member

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    Does iTunes let you do that with its DRM-protected content? (not just MP3 purchases). If so, and the MP3s created have all the correct data, then it would be a valid workaround - just as limiting purchases to MP3s only would be (though not possible until fairly recently).
     
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