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News UK Government confirms July porn block plans

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by bit-tech, 18 Apr 2019.

  1. The_Crapman

    The_Crapman Don't phone it's just for fun.

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  2. Vault-Tec

    Vault-Tec Green Plastic Watering Can

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    I had to enable all naughty content whatsoever when I upgraded my mother's to fibre with Sky. So I guess at least one of them did it.

    I only needed the account number though, so easy for any kid if there's a bill lying around.

    This won't stop kids watching pron. Parents should take phones and devices from kids if they want to stop it,or, educate themselves on blocking content themselves.

    Either way there's sure to be ways around it as stated already.
     
  3. Xlog

    Xlog Active Member

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    Out of interest, is the current implementation just a DNS filter or does the ISPs actually block IPs/ filter the content?
     
  4. Anfield

    Anfield Well-Known Member

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    Officially we will never be allowed to know that, just like we will never be officially allowed to know what exactly they are blocking.

    But if we take the practical example of the copyright related blocks already in place then it is just a simple DNS filter (which they probably deemed sufficient since the BT supplied Router has the option to change DNS settings locked down, yes there are ways around it, no I ain't saying how due to forum rules on piracy stuff).
     
  5. Xlog

    Xlog Active Member

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    Ah, the good old "locked gates, but no fence" approach.
     
  6. Corky42

    Corky42 Where's walle?

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    Speaking of which i would imagine this age check thing is going to lead to an increase in the number of people using circumvention methods and by extension being able to access what were previously blocked piracy stuff.
     
  7. liratheal

    liratheal Sharing is Caring

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    The "Won't someone think of the children" brigade.

    The same ones who can't possibly comprehend having a conversation with their child about a "difficult" topic like sex and/or homosexuality, I imagine.
     
    adidan and perplekks45 like this.
  8. Anfield

    Anfield Well-Known Member

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    And the very same ones who run to the Daily Heil to condemn the Nanny State when schools try to fill the gaping knowledge void left by said parents.
     
  9. SimoomiZ

    SimoomiZ Member

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    Have you read about recent ISP(and presumably govt) objections to encrypted DNS over HTTPS (DoH)?

    A UDP request is sent to your ISP's DNS server to resolve name(s), if that server can't answer the query, it forwards a TCP request to its DNS root server.

    Apparently UK ISPs have big concerns over moves towards fully encrypted DNS, all over https. From ISPreview article 11th April 2019 : https://www.ispreview.co.uk/index.p...s-have-big-concerns-about-dns-over-https.html

    Certain browsers now support DoH (firefox added this feature ver. 62 onwards, but it's not enabled by default) plus it requires user technical know how to get it up and running. In trr-only mode(DoH only), your ISP can't snoop on your name resolves if using alternative dns servers. Although the SNI part of HTTPS connections are still in clear text, so eavesdroppers on path can still figure out which hosts you connect to.

    We really need more tech literate politicians to argue for net freedom, less network interference and as Tim Berners-Lee called for: an internet bill of rights. The UK already has the most onerous, and secretive lists and data collection practices in the free world. The govt missed their own deadline to respond to a ECtHR ruling in 2018, against indiscriminate collection and retention of communications data, also known as bulk intercept.
     
    Last edited: 23 Apr 2019
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