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Education Using bicycle helmet cameras?

Discussion in 'General' started by bigsharn, 29 Oct 2011.

  1. Ljs

    Ljs Modder

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    That does it.

    [​IMG]

    /thread?
     
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  2. mvagusta

    mvagusta Did a skid that went for two weeks.

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    [​IMG]
     
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  3. sp4nky

    sp4nky BF3: Aardfrith WoT: McGubbins

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    mv wins the thread.

    I'm outta here.
     
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  4. lm_wfc

    lm_wfc Minimodder

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    Upkeep of the roads? What do you think does the damage, a bike or 10 tonne lorries and buses.


    Also, op you're a dick. Of you smash your skull against concrete the concrete will win every time. I did it once not even on a bike and still have a scar
     
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  5. julianmartin

    julianmartin resident cyborg.

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    Good thing you were wearing a helmet then eh? Oh wait.....:hehe:
     
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  6. longweight

    longweight Possibly Longbeard.

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    Wet leaves are going to take you down? What tyres are you using?!
     
  7. M7ck

    M7ck Ⓜod Ⓜaster

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    British Rail spec leaves?
     
  8. bigsharn

    bigsharn Officially demotivated

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    25c Marathon plus', but it wouldn't be the first time I've gone down on wet leaves on Marathon Plus'
     
  9. longweight

    longweight Possibly Longbeard.

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    You need to use the correct tyres for the conditions, if your current tyres mean you go down on wet leaves then you need to change them not ride further out in the road!
     
  10. mucgoo

    mucgoo Minimodder

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    Unless your braking or turning hard and using really smooth road tyres wet leaves shouldn't be a problem.
    Try cycling slower?
     
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  11. MarkW7

    MarkW7 Total Noob

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  12. bigsharn

    bigsharn Officially demotivated

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    Or I could save myself the £60+ and just ride out further into the road? No matter what tyres you use, you can still end up on the deck if the road surface is slippy enough. Marathon Plus' are made for commuting, including in the wet.
     
  13. longweight

    longweight Possibly Longbeard.

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    Or you could use a vehicle suitable for the road conditions! Basically you are saying you would rather take up more of the road instead of buying the right equipment to use the road safely?
     
  14. dancingbear84

    dancingbear84 error 404

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    And whine like a toddler about traffic coming too close?
    Seriously dude, as an adult you should have learnt actions have consequences.
    Choice 1. Not buy appropriate tyres and ride into the road whilst not wearing a helmet.
    Consequence 1. Get cars overtaking too close for your personal comfort, risk taking a knock and having your skull save your brain.

    Choice 2. Spend the cash on the tyres, and a helmet, get change from a hundred notes
    Consequence 2. Ride in the cycle lane safe in the knowledge that leaves won't take you down, and if they do then the helmet will protect your skull. Also the traffic will not be as close to you and not in your comfort zone.

    I used to cycle and a helmet saved my life. I also rode motorbikes so I know the dangers of being passed and also coming off. Even on a 125cc I always rode with full protection, even if I looked stupid. Quite frankly I think any cyclist who goes on the road without a helmet is an idiot, but as I say that is from past experiences.
    I really hope you don't have an accident and please keep as safe as you can on the road, don't cause an accident to yourself or others.
     
  15. bigsharn

    bigsharn Officially demotivated

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    And what sort of vehicle did you have in mind?
    I am saying I would rather take up more of the road, consequently using the road safely.

    Obviously you haven't been reading this thread...
    Choice 1. I can use whatever tyres I like and I'd still be just as likely to go down. In fact the Marathons are slightly deflated, so I have more contact area than most MTB tyres pumped up as they should be.
    Before we get into *yet another* argument I still run my marathons above the minimum recommended pressure, just not the highest avaliable without them being liable to explode.

    Go back and search "University of Bath" and you'll see why your helmet point is a load of rubbish.

    You seriously don't know a great deal about cycling, do you?

    There are plenty of things within the cycle lane that don't involve the words "leaves" or "wet" that constitute enough reason to ignore their existance. Broken glass, bits of broken tarmac, uneven surface and dirt (which you can also slip on).

    And some basic maths:
    Most of the cycle lanes in York are tiny.
    Bikeability teaches cylists to cycle 1m from the kerbside (as I generally do).
    With the recommended cycle lane width being 1.5m, that leaves ~50cm between the centre of the bike and the edge of the cycle lane.
    Take into account that most bicycle handlebars are between 40cm and 54cm, half of that is between 20cm and 27cm.
    30cm-23cm is not enough passing room, even in a cycle lane that DOES conform to the standards, which is rare in York.
    Especially seeing as the dashed white line of doom isn't a magical invisible forcefield that stops motorists straying over the line, or cyclists having to go into the next lane to correct (as an example) hitting a bit of uneven lane surface.

    And you clearly can't read a thread, as I mentioned before, I wouldn't get much change from £200 if I went and got a helmet, because they need to be custom fitted, plus the £60 for tyres. You're talking almost 3 weeks' wages.

    I'm sorry if this sounds abrupt, but I have answered these questions before.
     
  16. mvagusta

    mvagusta Did a skid that went for two weeks.

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    Maybe you could afford the custom helmet if you sold some camera equipment?
     
  17. sp4nky

    sp4nky BF3: Aardfrith WoT: McGubbins

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    OMG STOP THE PRESS. Dirt? Hey, if you're worried about slipping on some dirt, that's definitely a good reason not to cycle in the cycle lane. After all, there's never any dirt on the main carriageway, is there?

    I can read a thread but can you? Can you show where you've previously mentioned the cost of a custom-fitted helmet?

    By the way, how big would you say the space is between the bus and the kerb in this picture?
    [​IMG]
     
  18. format

    format What's a Dremel?

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    I will refer you to a certain Mr Chapman, who rebutes your accusations and such far more eloquently than I can.
     
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  19. longweight

    longweight Possibly Longbeard.

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    I mean you need to have suitable tyres on your bike to use the roads safely, if wet leaves and dirt can take you down then you either have the wrong tyres or very poor balance and bike skills.
     
  20. Pookeyhead

    Pookeyhead It's big, and it's clever.

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    Well, with that logic, next time the road is a little slippery, instead of adjusting my driving, leaving bigger gaps, accelerating, braking, and steering more gently, I'll just drive on the sidewalk... or in a cycle lane. Brilliant. Cheers for the advice Sharn ;)
     

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