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Modding UV filtering lenses for DIY sunglasses?

Discussion in 'Modding' started by razerz, 10 May 2010.

  1. razerz

    razerz What's a Dremel?

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    This might be a crazy idea, but I wanted to try to make a pair of steampunk sunglasses/googles as a gift from scratch.
    My problem is finding a suitable material to make the lenses from, I am mainly looking for some type of plastic, due to it being easier to work with, but ready-cut glass would be preferred to add to the "realism".
    And of course I want the material to be UV-filtering to actually be of some use.
    So my question is really if someone have seen/heard of/worked with or generally know anything about UV-filtering materials?
     
  2. bulldogjeff

    bulldogjeff The modding head is firmly back on.

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    Have a look for acrylic manufacturers on line, they do all sorts for windows with uv filters .You might be able to get 2 small sample sheets dead cheap and just cut them to size:thumb:
     
  3. Moriquendi

    Moriquendi Bit Tech Biker

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    You can buy uv filters for camera lenses, they're dead cheap too (I think I got mine for about a fiver), they're also round and have a thread on meaning that if you wanted to make them polarising sunglasses you could add a polarizing filter, want to make them darker? screw on another neutral filter. You can find many different sizes too.

    Moriquendi
     
  4. razerz

    razerz What's a Dremel?

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    Camera filter's a great idea! :thumb:

    I will have another look after acrylic manufacturers today (being tired when searching for something new isn't a good idea...)

    If anyone else have suggestions, I am all ears.
     
  5. Lubb

    Lubb What's a Dremel?

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    Camera filters would cost quite a bit, I'd guess.

    Almost any kind of plastic or glass you choose is going to be a pretty good UV filter.
    You would have a much more difficult time if you had asked for a filter that would only pass UV light. Polycarbonate is the obvious answer, as it's shatterproof, and used for real actual sunglasses.

    To color the lenses....... If you can find a local place that sells gel filter sheets (used for coloring stage lights) they come in lots of different colors. Note that there is a color and a transmission level. Some gels are very "dark" and only transmit a few percent of the total light, even in their peak wavelength.

    The wikipedia article notes that gels don't last forever--which is true--but then, that's meant for gels used on stage lights, that get rather hot in use and the heat is what ruins them. A lighter-tinted piece of gel used for sunglasses would last for years.

    The gel is just a flimsy piece of plastic film--but if you sandwich it between the plastic lens (on the inside) and the glass on the outside, it will stay flat between them.

    You can use a cheap piece of ordinary glass on the outside of the plastic lens to protect the plastic from scratching. Any goggles that get used will need to be cleaned off, the outside will get dirtier than the insides and no plastic out there will have anywhere near the scratch resistance of glass.
    ~
     
  6. Moriquendi

    Moriquendi Bit Tech Biker

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    I disagree.

    Moriquendi
     
  7. Cheapskate

    Cheapskate Insane? or just stupid?

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    You don't want something that might FU the user's sight, so camera filters are the way to go. If you can find adjustable polarizing filters, that would be perfect. They have 2 lenses and a knob so you can spin one. A 25 degree turn of the knob will make them go from clear to dark.
    Connecting the 2 knobs with a lever would keep them in sync.


    -Or you could just make the frames and have a glasses shop custom fit some round lenses. A better bet would be to measure some round lenses at one of those shops, make the glasses to those specs, and have them drop a set of lenses in while you wait.


    Edit: And I go back and read that Moriquendi already said the same thing.:duh:
     
  8. Moriquendi

    Moriquendi Bit Tech Biker

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    Nobody every listens to me, I keep telling people I'm a frikken genius but they never listen:wallbash::p

    Moriquendi
     
  9. Lubb

    Lubb What's a Dremel?

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    -Except that camera filters are not polycarbonate, they're glass. It seems rather odd to me to worry about UV exposure and at the same time ignore the risk of using glass lenses.

    -----------

    Typical polycarbonate is basically shatterproof and still blocks so much UV that most glasses don't bother with any additional UV-blocking coatings at all:

    http://www.eyedoctorguide.com/childrens_eyecare/polycarbonate_glasses_children.html

    "... UV Protection
    Polycarbonate is a natural UV filter which means that at least 99% of the harmful ultra-violet rays of the sun are blocked from entering the eye, even without the glasses having a special lens coating. ..."
    ~
     
  10. Moriquendi

    Moriquendi Bit Tech Biker

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    Umm... people use glass lenses all the time, contact lenses used to be made out of glass, spectacle lenses have been glass for as long as there have been spectacles.

    If you're that bothered about the chance of them breaking then you could laminate clear plastic onto the glass.

    Moriquendi
     
  11. Cheapskate

    Cheapskate Insane? or just stupid?

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    I still wear real glass lenses. For the stuff I do, they last a lot longer than 'scratchproof' plastic lenses.
     
  12. razerz

    razerz What's a Dremel?

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    Lots of great suggestions in here.
    The idea of adjustable lenses to change the darkness is great, thanks for that idea Cheaps!

    In regard to UV protection and shatterproofness I reckon that I could use a thin piece of plexi that absorbs the UV light.
    I have found this plexi sheet which, if I read the data sheet correctly, is rated to withstand 15kJ/square meter as well is being UV absorbing. This could be placed on the inside of the polarizing filter to protect the eyes in case of the glass shatters (in effect doing as Moriquindi said, partially laminating the glass).
     
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  13. Cheapskate

    Cheapskate Insane? or just stupid?

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    I don't get the fear of glass. Does your friend get punched in the face a lot or something? Filters are designed to take abuse.
     
  14. Moriquendi

    Moriquendi Bit Tech Biker

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    I also still wear glass glasses and they can take a fair amount of abuse, I don't think being punched in the face would do it, it think you'd have to be hit my a stone chip or shot with a BB gun.

    If you want to have adjustable darkness using polarizing filters then you will need two for each eye, the eye doesn't care about the polarization of the light it sees so the only way to get the darkness to change is to have one stationary polariser and another that rotates, the further away from being aligned they are the darker it will be. Probably the best bet would be to use a plastic polarising film for the stationary polariser next to the eye and a photographic polariser for the other one that rotates, that way you get your eyes protected in the event that you get caught in a BB shootout.

    Moriquendi
     
  15. razerz

    razerz What's a Dremel?

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    It seem that the best idea is to use three lenses for each eye; Two polarizing lenses to adjust the brightness and one UV-protecting lens?

    My main concern about using glass was that I didn't know how durable camera lenses were, but after reading a bit about them it seems that I can choose whichever material that is cheapest/most available. Which most likely means camera lenses for the polarizing filter and plexi for the UV-lens.
     

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