News Valve releases SteamOS Brewmaster preview build

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by Gareth Halfacree, 26 Jun 2015.

  1. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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  2. Cerberus90

    Cerberus90 Car Spannerer

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    Installing onto my old S754 Athlon64, :D

    Very slow to install, even though I'm going from a USB stick (although I am on a SATA1 HDD).


    Does this count as a steam box? It's on a box. :D

    [​IMG]

    Nope, won't work, looks like the 8400GS isn't supported by the drivers steamOS uses.
     
    Last edited: 26 Jun 2015
  3. RedFlames

    RedFlames ...is not a Belgian football team

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    Looks like it's powered by steam too, is the coal bucket out of shot? :p
     
  4. pbryanw

    pbryanw Member

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    After a bit of tweaking, managed to get SteamOS (Brewmaster) working in a VMware Fusion VM on my Hackintosh. I couldn't get previous versions of SteamOS to work in a VM, so it's a step forward in this regard. As far as changes go, I can't see many new cosmetic changes, but it's still early days as far as this build goes. Although, as the article says, there might be a lot of under-the-hood changes.

    I expect those on Windows could get it working in a VMware Workstation VM. I used a Debian 7 x64 template, installed the VMware tools, and deleted some runtime libraries, to get it working in a VM.
     
  5. forum_user

    forum_user forum_title

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    I had a spare 120GB SSD and installed the previous version of SteamOS. Was really happy with it. Although when I tried to run GeekBench it hung, and I had to hold down my machines power button and reboot.

    Will install the latest build asap.
     
  6. theshadow2001

    theshadow2001 [DELETE] means [DELETE]

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    You could probably make that work with some fluting about installing nvidia drivers manually
     
  7. Griffter

    Griffter New Member

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    hi

    can someone let me know what the benefits are of installing steam OS now or in the optimistic future is?

    is it more secure than windows? more stable? etc... im a non techy that just know how to probably fix my own pc from time to time.
     
  8. SexyHyde

    SexyHyde Member

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    In all honesty there are no real benefits over Windows. Steam OS enables you to create a console with a PC, but you'll lose all you games that are Windows only. I see it more as an OS that is pushing Linux game development.
     
  9. forum_user

    forum_user forum_title

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    You won't lose anything if you are able to stream the games from your main Win machine to the SteamOS box.

    I have my fingers crossed that Valve lock-down their OS to the point that no services are running except Steam and the games. That way I can happily fast boot into SteamOS in any room and not be concerned about what MS have left unprotected.

    Although I have now ordered 2 Steam Links and 2 controllers, so not sure how it will all come together after October. Having SteamOS streaming to a Steam Link 'should' be better than streaming from a bloatd Win install.

    Time will tell.
     
  10. theshadow2001

    theshadow2001 [DELETE] means [DELETE]

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    It's essentially steam ported to and running on top of, a version of linux. There are no real tangible benefits at the moment. SteamOS has a subset of games from the steam library available to it. Windows on the other hand can play all of the games. You could have your own steam machine using Windows as much as you could using SteamOS.

    In the optomistic future it may take the place of windows for PC gaming, but right now that seems very unlikely. One of the main benefits of SteamOS is actually for Valve rather than customers. Using SteamOS Valve can control the environment much better than they can with Windows. SteamOS tries to remove the dependency of Valve on Microsoft. Thus protecting Valve from any changes Microsoft may decide to implement which may be unfavorable for Valve. Since Microsoft own XBox they are competitors to a certain degree.

    To sum it up, SteamOS is a business risk mitigation strategy for valve. Thats about it.
     
  11. forum_user

    forum_user forum_title

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    Correction. I think you only summed up a bunch of news items related to how MS looked to be screwing Valve and other download clients, by creating a wall for Steam in Win8.

    You seem to have not summed up the majority of the benefits.

    Correction: future benefits.

    Currently, installing SteamOS is only useful for inquisitive people with a spare drive or machine, who might want to see what Valve are doing.

    Ultimately the SteamOS will be on more dedicated hardware created by a load of manufacturers and Valve. Look at the tabs in Steam that are arranged like this:

    Featured Items, Games, Software, Hardware, Demos, News

    Now put your cursor over Hardware and there is a load of info abou what is coming. It is more comparable to competition for the console market than a "business risk mitigation strategy". I would bet Valve are being slightly more adventurous than what theshadow2001 would have you believe.
     
    Last edited: 29 Jun 2015
  12. theshadow2001

    theshadow2001 [DELETE] means [DELETE]

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    I don't have Gaben's phone number unfortunately so my information does indeed come from the news.

    You've started your list of corrections by saying its just a curiosity at the moment. That hardly disagree with what I have said. That's also where you seem to have ended your corrections as well. The current generation steam machines are off the shelf PC hardware. I doubt they will stray from this. If they did they would essentially be creating their own dedicated console, thus isolating their current customers or creating more work for developers or both.

    Basically all of the hardware items already exist, small form factor PCs, VR, Controllers and game streaming. None of these are benefits of steam OS and are available else where.

    You are on cloud cuckoo if you think any decision valve makes is not for the good of the business. Romanticizing corporations as you have done with valve, is generally not a good idea. It removes the ability to look at them critically. SteamOS exists to ensure the continuation of Valves business.

    This is basically what happened when Newell saw Windows 8
    [​IMG]
     
  13. forum_user

    forum_user forum_title

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    Hehe. Okey dokey.
     
  14. Cerberus90

    Cerberus90 Car Spannerer

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    Probably, but I can't be bothered, :D I very much doubt it'll play much of anything anyway even if I did get it working, :D
     
  15. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    Here's my take on it all.

    Every time a new generation of consoles come out, PC gamers start up with the "you can build a decent gaming PC for the same price and it's a bajillion times better." Every time, said PC gamers fail to include the cost of an operating system in their calculations. When you're trying to build a PC that can run games at between 720p and 1080p for ~£300, a £75 operating system is a hell of a hit to take. Replace the £75 operating system with a £0 operating system and suddenly the budget is a lot more realistic.

    That's the benefit from the end-user's perspective, but what's in it for Valve? Well, that should be obvious: every person who buys a console instead of a gaming PC becomes one less person buying their games through Steam. Even those who have both a gaming PC and one or more consoles will likely spread their spending across the two. Release a free OS which practically forces the user to buy stuff through Steam, get it on console-like hardware at a roughly equivalent retail price, and you just expanded your market considerably. Remember, not everyone can just jump into PC gaming: sure, you and I might enjoy the fun of driver updates, SLI profiles, patches, patches, and more patches, but less technical types would struggle. Batman: Arkham Knight is a perfect example, working more or less as-intended on Xbox One and PS4 but being unplayable on PC - to the point where WB has removed it from sale.

    SteamOS makes PC hardware more console-like: you don't have to budget for the OS (just like a console, which has its OS pre-installed); you don't have to worry about drivers (just like a console, 'cos the OS handles all that for you); you don't have to worry about patches (just like a console, because Steam on SteamOS handles all that for you); you don't even have to worry about where to spend your cash (just like a console, SteamOS has its own storefront which is the very first thing you see when it boots up - although unlike a console it's possible to add non-Steam software and even escape into a more traditional desktop environment to run legacy applications.) 'Course, many of these points (automatic driver updates, a unified storefront and game patching) also apply to Steam on Windows...

    You may note that none of what I've written offers a compelling advantage to those who already run Windows on their gaming system. For them, it's all negative: SteamOS is buggy and has a smaller software library compared with Steam on Windows. You could argue that there are some small advantages - Linux is typically more efficient as an OS compared to Windows, so it may be slightly faster, and it may be more secure against malware and external attack - but I would say the cons outweigh the pros.

    That's not to say it's not worth playing around with, of course, especially if you've got some old hardware with no valid OS.

    TL;DR: If you're already gaming on Windows, SteamOS probably isn't for you.
     

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