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Graphics Ventilation for SLi/Crossfire

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by malbluff, 15 Aug 2012.

  1. malbluff

    malbluff New Member

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    I take it, particularly with large and powerfull graphics cards, fitting a second, in SLi/crossfire, must have some effect on the ventilation, of the first.
    Is that something that can, normally, be dealt with by adjustment of case vent, perhaps fitting a side fan, or do you really HAVE to think about water cooling? Does it make much difference whether the GPU's, themselves, have single or twin (or 3) fans?
    In other words, if selecting a GPU, to which I MAY add another, in the future, is it a good idea to use a twin fan one, or should I be thinking about a CASE that will take water cooling? Is it a case of how much, if any, overclocking?
     
  2. dunx

    dunx ITX is where it's at !

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    It depends on the main board you have, and the spacing between the PCI_E slots, mine could take a number of triple slot GPU's if I could afford them....

    Older cards like my GTX480 are hot and can be noisy, but more modern cards have a much lower power requirement, and are therefore easier to keep cool.

    How much does noise affect you ? Mine isn't that quiet, but playing a movie means I have my hi-fi on anyway.

    I would advise that a single high spec. card is better than two cheaper cards, I had a pair of GTX 460's that cost more than a GTX 480, but couldn't out-perform it. But the use and screen resolution are also factors to consider.

    All IMHO.

    dunx
     
  3. damien c

    damien c Mad FPS Gamer

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    I will echo this!!!

    I had a motherboard, that would allow SLI so I tried running 2 8800gts's in sli and found that the top card was overheating unless I pointed a desk fan directly at both cards.

    Changed to a different motherboard that had a little more space between the 2 slots and it no longer needed the desktop fan pointing, in to the case because the top card had enough room to draw air in.

    I have 2 side panel fans on my case at the moment to help cool my graphics card, but they are going to be taken out because they are making no difference to the temps at all, in regards to the motherboard or graphics card.

    What you have to ask yourself though is do you need a 2nd card?

    I would only consider going to sli now if I wanted to add another 2 monitors.
     
  4. malbluff

    malbluff New Member

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    I'm using an Asus P8Z77-V PRO, but, like a lot of people, I guess, am waiting to see what a REAL gtx660ti has to offer, before finally deciding on GPU.
    I have no PLANS to SLi, but who knows what new screen, or something, might make it worthwhile, in the near future. It's more a case of being a "boy scout", and being prepared.
    If spending a few extra quid, now, on twin fanned GPU, or a case that will allow for a side fan, would be of benefit IF, then it's worth doing, "in case".
     
  5. Taniniver

    Taniniver Member

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    I'm using SLI right now with two GTX 570's. I wouldn't recommend a twin fan card unless you have very good case airflow, since they dump the hot air (or at least some of it) back into your case - things could get toasty pretty fast.

    Both my 570's are the reference design type coolers, which exhaust the hot air out of the back of the case. There is a single empty slot between them, and if anything the lower card tends to run hotter than the upper one - the design of my case doesn't leave much room under it for air intake.

    You certainly don't *need* water cooling, though you can of course if you like, but if you don't go with water cooling a side fan is a must.

    Depending on what game I'm playing and how demanding it is the cards can either be just fine, or the fans can start to really ramp up. If I'm going to be playing something demanding I turn the side intake fan up to high speed - it's still quieter this way overall since then the graphics card fans don't end up working as hard. I also removed one of the drive cages to allow better airflow from the front intake.

    EDIT: As for overclocking, I haven't even tried it. Under very stressful games like BF3 or Crysis 2, the cards reach 85 degrees already - I wouldn't like to push it.
     
  6. Blarte

    Blarte Moderate Modder

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    If you can install a 120 / 140 mm fan directly in line with the cards, you'll not have an issue. Air cooled are always warm, if you close off the flow they will get warmer stands to reason. I do advocate water cooling though ..it not onlygives you larger head room for over clocking but extends the life of the kit as it runs cooler.. and its quiet
     
  7. malbluff

    malbluff New Member

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    Intending to use Carbide 500r case, so, presumably plenty of vent capability. Fancy having a go at water cooling, at some stage, but only have vague idea of technicalities, so maybe that's one for the future.
     
  8. Fizzban

    Fizzban Man of Many Typos

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    When I used Crossfire my idle temps from using one card hit load temps..at idle. This wasn't an issue as I had enough airflow in my case to deal with it. But it is worth bearing in mind especially if like me both those cards dumped their waste heat straight back into the case.
     
  9. malbluff

    malbluff New Member

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    Thanks, guys. If I'd have been able to get hold of a 670 Asus TOP, a couple of weeks ago, the damn thing would have been built, by now. As we're moving in Sept, will now hold off til then. Probably gives me TOO MUCH time to "ponder".
     
  10. GregTheRotter

    GregTheRotter New Member

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    I'm getting a second reference GTX 670 in a few days, so I'll be able to provide my temps as well. My board is the asus X58 P6T, so there's no space between the cards. In other words I might as well be running tri sli the way my cards are going to be spaced. I do however have an akasa apache 14cm fan as my side intake, so I'm sure that will make a big difference than if I had no side intake.
     
  11. MjFrosty

    MjFrosty New Member

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    A lot to factor into this really before you'd get a correct answer. How big is your chassis? What motherboard? What cards?

    Sandwiching non reference coolers in my experience gives far worse temps as they don't disperse hot air as well. Especially on Nvidia cards.

    You can happily sandwich two reference 680 GTXs without one card exceeding the others temperature. The most effective way besides w/c to combat high temps is to have a side intake, simple as that.
     
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