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PSU Watercooling a 1000 Watt PSU

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by O O 7, 7 Dec 2008.

  1. DaveVader

    DaveVader Fast Action Response Team

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    To be perfectly honest, I don't know. I've not ventured into watercooling yet myself but hell have I done my research!
    I know that putting your own loop together is more fun and rewarding and you will be addicted to it from then on! The stuff I hear about Thermalright though just really puts me off them to be honest hence why I would prefer, personally, a custom setup.
     
  2. Matticus

    Matticus ...

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    The mostly XSPC kit would be better. You might want to look at their blocks aswell, I know dave linked to a ocz block but I have heard such greats things about the XSPC blocks, they seem to be very good quality for little money.

    I think in general it is widely known that thermaltake don't make the best water cooling stuff, yes it may get good reviews by some places but a lot of that might be due to who is advertising on their site that week/month if you catch my drift. Also the thermaltake might provide ok value for money as they really are cheap as chips.

    I think in the long run you will be very happy with yourself after building your own loop and knowing that is is outperforming the thermaltake.
     
  3. DaveVader

    DaveVader Fast Action Response Team

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    I was gonna link the XSPC block (as that's what I will be getting soon) but I linked a cheaper one for the budget loop.
     
  4. Matticus

    Matticus ...

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    I too am going to get an XSPC loop soon :p

    If I can find a cheap antec p182 I will be using that as well, but I might just attempt to shoehorn a 240 rad into my current midi tower.
     
  5. O O 7

    O O 7 New Member

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    http://www.xcase.co.uk/p/345610/antec-p182-black-no-psu-.html (they used to have the P182 at £65).

    It looks like the EK Supreme performs better than both the XSPC and the D-TEK FuZion:
    http://www.overclock3d.net/reviews.php?/cases_cooling/ek_supreme_cpu_water_block/4

    SCAN have the SXPC for £30:
    http://www.scan.co.uk/Product.aspx?WebProductID=901658&source=froogle

    EK Supreme £33:
    http://www.thecoolingshop.com/product_info.php?products_id=2890
     
  6. sheninat0r

    sheninat0r What's a Dremel?

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    The EK Supreme is extremely restrictive, so if you do go with that take that into account. Flow rates will drop and cooling for other components in the loop may suffer compared to a Fuzion or similar.
     
  7. wharrad

    wharrad New Member

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    Just a quick note about watercooling a power supply....

    It's possible, I used to use one around 4 years ago. I bought it off the shelf due to the worries about modding powersupplies. Anyway, it was made by a company called SilentMaxxx (or something like that - not to be confused with the fans) and had to be imported from Germany.

    The biggest problem with them is water actually in the powersupply, if it leaked there'd probably be a fire or you'd put mains voltage through your loop. To get over that they put in a big copper block that travelled flush to the back of the PSU. From there a seperate water block was attached to the copper outside of the PSU.

    It was actually a good idea, and if they'd used heatpipes and so forth might it may have actually worked. Unfortunately the heat didn't travel down the copper quick enough and the transister furtherest away from the waterblock kept on blowing. Once I'd used up a couple of spare transistors soldered in there I figured it was doomed to always fail and gave up.


    Oh and a word of warning, non-conductive fluid is just pants. It becomes conductive from junk in your pipes, or if you're really clean, as soon as it touchs junk when it leaks from your pipes. Also, it's more an oily substance, so when it does leak it doesn't completely evaporate - have you ever tried cleaning under the BGA chips on a motherboard or GPU? It doesn't work!! Your safer with distilled water.

    Gooood luck with the project! :)
     
  8. O O 7

    O O 7 New Member

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    Yep. It looks like they haven't yet figured out how to make a proper water cooled PSU.

    And it doesn't look like they are trying either!
     
  9. sheninat0r

    sheninat0r What's a Dremel?

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    For reasons which we have gone over in this thread, water cooled PSUs are impractical and not a good solution to whatever problem you have. Air cooling can easily keep most reasonable PSUs (read: not 1000W overkill machines) plenty cool while making very little noise.
     
  10. Nexxo

    Nexxo * Prefab Sprout – The King of Rock 'n' Roll

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    Actually, many non-conductive fluids nowadays are not oily and remain non-conductive even if contaminated (and with what? Non-cunductive fluid = clean loops. No corrosion/algae, see?). Their drawback is that they aren't entirely non-conductive with high voltages so not safe in your PSU. And they are indeed a bit tricky to clean off.

    The ultimate non-conductive fluid remains Fluorinert. It has a viscosity lower than water, it absolutely does not conduct any voltage (not even when contaminated), and when spilled it evaporates at room temperature, leaving no residue.

    Drawback? Hard to get, and prepare to pay £150,-- per litre. At least.
     
  11. eeevan

    eeevan Dremel Master

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    ARHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHAAHHHHHHHHHHHHRRRRRRRRRRRHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHARRRRRRRRRRRRRRR!!!!!!!!!!!!



    I can't even to begin to state how much this little tidbit of information bugs me.

    Take that mindset, and throw it out the ****ing window.


    And who told you that? Because I would smack them silly if I were you.
     
  12. O O 7

    O O 7 New Member

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    LOL take it easy. It was just some other forum dude.

    Also, what makes you say all this? Can you provide some information for those who are less informed?

    It seems like this 25fps is wrong, because I can feel the refresh on my TV (which I suppose is 50hz).
     
  13. wharrad

    wharrad New Member

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    :) Well yeah, wanted that stuff the first time around, but couldn't find it in small enough quantities, so went with FluidXP I believe.

    Maybe it's true that they're better these days, but I'd hate to see someone fall in the same hole as me. That destroyed my X800 XT PE and Abit IC7-Max 3 and I'm still hurt.... Ahhh those were the golden days of modding for me!



    As for the FPS thing, it is my understanding that comes from film. When the camera shoots one frame is actually shoots the motion too. So say if a guy's running in a frame, this frame will catch 1/25th of a second's worth of running - it'd look slightly blurred.

    Your eye at that frame rate has trouble seeing the stills. This slight bluring also joins together perfectly from one frame to the next - so you see a smooth image and no jerkiness.

    In games though (forgetting certain technologies to simulate this) 1/25th will show a still where the person is then, not a capture of time and no blur. The next frame will show where the person is next, again no blurring - they just jump 1/25th of a second forward. Therefore, there's no blurring to connect with the last frame, there'll be a definate gap which your eye can see.

    So the higher the frame rate, the smaller the gaps in the moving objects, the closer to the film effect you'll get.


    As for how your eye works, well, it's made up from a bunch of rods and cones, I presume they all work constantly as an analog system and don't take a single frame in unison - but a clinical psychologist could answer that better than I :)
     
    Last edited: 12 Dec 2008
  14. sheninat0r

    sheninat0r What's a Dremel?

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    This thread is deliciously off-topic.

    The motion that we see in film and on our computers is apparent motion, where the brain stitches together a series of stills and emulates motion. 24FPS is what movies are shot at because they use heavy motion blur to further trick our minds into seeing motion. Games with no motion blur need high frame rates to achieve the same perceived smoothness of motion. Real life, of course, isn't measured in FPS.

    Even more off topic than the off topic discussion above, different animals' eyes have different FPS "thresholds" of combining stills into motion. IIRC dogs see each frame at 25FPS as a still image and not as part of any motion... I wonder what FPS they would need on Crysis to make it playable?
     
  15. O O 7

    O O 7 New Member

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    Guys thanks for the explanation. That was a cool bit of knowledge there!
     
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