1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Education We Like to Ride Bicycles

Discussion in 'General' started by RTT, 8 May 2008.

  1. Jipa

    Jipa Avoiding the "I guess.." since 2004

    Joined:
    5 Feb 2004
    Posts:
    6,363
    Likes Received:
    125
    I CAN HAS FULL SUSPENSION! WOOP WOOP!

    A friend of mine bought Ironhorse Sunday frame and gave his Timeless FR2 to me. It's heavy, it's old, but it was freebie and it's MINE! Now I just need new fork, the 110 mm(?) DJ just doesn't cut it.
     
  2. Otis1337

    Otis1337 aka - Ripp3r

    Joined:
    28 Nov 2007
    Posts:
    4,516
    Likes Received:
    121
    Random unrelated fact of the day... my bike was imported from your country!
    http://manfredbikes.net/
    Its the same one as in the banners of the website, its changed quite a bit now tho :p as you can see from the recent images iv posted few pages back
     
  3. Mik3yB @ CCL

    Mik3yB @ CCL Everything is not going to be OK

    Joined:
    11 May 2010
    Posts:
    271
    Likes Received:
    5
    My parents live near the Orange frames shop up the road in Halifax, I've still never visited their place though. I probably should at some point but that might make me buy one and they're fairly expensive!
     
    Last edited: 18 Jul 2011
  4. Otis1337

    Otis1337 aka - Ripp3r

    Joined:
    28 Nov 2007
    Posts:
    4,516
    Likes Received:
    121
    would be cool to have a look round if they let you! :p and yeah, they make some expensive but amazing frames
     
  5. Mik3yB @ CCL

    Mik3yB @ CCL Everything is not going to be OK

    Joined:
    11 May 2010
    Posts:
    271
    Likes Received:
    5
  6. Jipa

    Jipa Avoiding the "I guess.." since 2004

    Joined:
    5 Feb 2004
    Posts:
    6,363
    Likes Received:
    125
    We found a new track :)




    (skip to 15 s if in hurry)

    Video quality courtesy of my friends phone :duh: (also note my dayglow yellow frame <3)
     
  7. Malvolio

    Malvolio .

    Joined:
    14 Dec 2003
    Posts:
    4,632
    Likes Received:
    178
    It has been a week since I got back from 260k in two days, but I'm ready to relay my story. Bit picture heavy, but you don't mind, right?

    [​IMG]
    Monday morning Rick, my travelling companion, and myself awake before the sun, chasing dreams away in trade for miles on the pavement. This is the scene after we hitched our gear up and meet at the nearest train station between our two homes: two beasts of burden awaiting their journey. After some brief pleasantries we were on our way out of the city, exiting the train at it's final terminal just before seven in the morning.

    [​IMG]
    The weather presented an ominous sign of rain for the days ahead, but this would prove to be nothing more than a dark-tongued tease. Aside from a few spits and some fog (below) we were bathed in a cool, diffused light for the entire first day of riding, even seeing several picturesque bursts of sunlight further on towards our destination.

    [​IMG]
    Rick in the lead as we were turning into our first town along the way, Cochrane, though you would never know this due to how heavy the fog was hanging for this stretch of the highway.

    [​IMG]
    Straight after leaving Cochrane city limits the gloom lifted quite a bit off our eyes and allowed us to carry on with much enlightened spirits.

    [​IMG]
    It was only when we hit the half-way point did the journey really start to shape up for me: scenery, wildlife, smells, and traffic all showed themselves markedly different than they do within city limits. Our day couldn't have been going any better up to this point, or so we thought until the next brief rest-stop to relieve ourselves of certain biological "pressures" and to alleviate hunger with the fresh fruit laden within my pack...

    [​IMG]
    We'd eaten, relieved ourselves individually abreast the nearest tree, packed up and hitched our mounts once more only to realise the terror of every cyclist: a flat tyre. Thankfully well stocked and prepared, it was a simple job to change the rear inner-tube of Ricks bike, but little did we understand the significance of this seemingly unique event.

    [​IMG]
    A scenery change once more as we entered the mountains, and a welcome one at that. Many times did we stop to appreciate the wonderful scenery slowly showing itself all around us with the receding clouds.

    [​IMG]
    Beside this little lake, parked in a day-use site, we sat for a few needed breaths, ate of more stowed goods, and conversed of the day past so far. As we were just outside (within 20k anyway) of our next town, Canmore, we decided to make a push for the town to grab some foodstuffs. Unfortunately not long after this picture, but much closer to Canmore, the repugnant rear inner-tube of Ricks bike once more made it's presence known through inability. Rather than change it, we realised that a friendly bike shop was located in town (a sister store to the one we work at), so it was decided to do a bandaide fix of partial inflation of the ruptured tube, then a mad rush to the shop, changing parts there. Barely just, we made it, only to find once more no direct indication of method of puncture, leaving us scratching our heads over the matter. The rest this stop provided was once again needed, and the friendly shop gave us a chance to stow our two-wheeled friends for a time whilst we went in pursuit of lunch supplies.

    [​IMG]
    After various stocks were gathered at a local store, we rode into the national park that was our destination, deciding to dig into our midday sustenance somewhere more fitting to our established goals for the day. As you can see in the picture above, an isolated, quiet, and beautiful meadow was found. The perfect dinner table scene for a wonderful day. For those of a curious bent, it was sour-dough bread rolls with thinly-sliced honey-ham and cheddar cheese. Chased with more fruit, it was every bit wonderful as it was needed, even though we only had a further 20k into camp. Once more, however, we found issue with air retention within the rear tyre of Ricks bike. Our mutual ire was somewhat calmed when the cause was known: a small metal wire lodged within the tyre itself, giving the tube a nasty little puncture.

    [​IMG]
    Rolling into camp we came upon quite a humorous sight: a large group of people were claiming to have phoned ahead and reserved a selection of sites within close proximity of each other earlier on that day, with the attendant at the gates stating the sites policy of not offering reservations, and furthering that the person currently occupying one of the supposedly spoken-for sites had shown up hours before the claimant party did, and therefore had priority. As background, nearly none of the campsites within the national park have the ability for people to reserve sites, a fact very clearly stated on the automated phone system and their website. Thankfully this didn't go on too long, and we got our lovely little walk-in only site, right by the lake. In the picture above my tent is situated to the readers left, and Ricks to the right. In the foreground sits my little ultra-compact, folding stool. Creature comforts and all that...

    [​IMG]
    The night went well enough, cooking a lovely dish of mashed potatoes covered in baked beans with buffalo peperoni in. There was also a heavy helping of shelled-peanuts and marshmallows for the fire. Above you can see how the lake greeted us the next morning. As glass, with a solid dome of clouds. This didn't last long however, and we were barely done our breakfast of oatmeal with our bags packed before the wind kicked up rather fiercely, removing every speck of cloud from atop our heads for our exodus from the site at eight that morning.

    [​IMG]
    Unfortunately, this presented us with the problem of a rather strong headwind the entire trip home. Further adding to the situation was the knowledge that only very rarely does the wind flow in the direction it did that day, typically flowing with equal force in the opposite direction, which we were well hoping for. As there wasn't anything to do about it, we soldered on. Once camp was behind us and we joined up with the main highway again, we realised a mistake from the previous day: the multi-use pathway system within the park that we had ignored the day before for fear of it not having an exit to the turn-off we required actually did allow for traffic in the direction we needed. However, not only did the map of the pathway we had with us say otherwise, but the official website of the national park shows no exit from the divided pathway to where we needed to go, nor do aerial photographs of that area (courtesy of Google maps) show an exit to where we needed to go. Thus, finding a beautiful separated pathway system running under the main highway through the park, allowing us entry into the area we needed to go was a welcome reprieve from the traffic, but disheartening with the knowledge that we could have used it the day prior.

    [​IMG]
    Trekking on out of the park and well on our way, rest stops became frequent. Rick found himself having some issues with the weight being carried upon his back due to the unfortunate packing situation of his bike. His current frame doesn't allow usage of a rear rack in combination with disk brakes (voids the warranty), and he didn't have time enough to secure other means of bicycle-mounted storage prior to the weekend, leading to frequent stops to alleviate his lower-back pain. Though with the scenery as good as it was, there wasn't a word of complaint from me.

    [​IMG]
    Drama of the day before courtesy of the lamentable inner-tube never made itself known on the second day, making the entire day just about two-wheeled bliss. Much more fruit was ingested throughout the many rest stops partaken of along the way, and many photo opportunities presented themselves. Riding towards that horizon, we once again reached midday with our stomachs letting themselves be known, and lunch was once more made courtesy of a market in a town along the way, in Cochrane, which we had only very briefly passed through the day before. The menu was very similar, but just different variations on the theme: multi-grain buns, a different variety of ham (I don't remember the particulars), and cheddar cheese once more. The addition of a banana with our meals was welcome change from the apple and orange standard of the prior food stops. Considering the hill before us out of town (7% grade at 3.5k long, with a 30kph headwind the entire way), the extra bit of sugar was welcome.

    [​IMG]
    Although the hills fangs bit in deeply, we managed to scale and conquer without much issue. As I'm the stronger rider, I pulled the entire way up, and eventually settled into providing the pace for the rest of the way home. Above is Calgary as it makes an appearance once more, off in the distance. For both of us it was a mixed sight, welcoming the chance to get some more food and a good hot shower, but regretting that our ride was ending so soon.

    [​IMG]
    Mixed feelings just inside the city limits; I'm in the foreground, Rick just beyond. Once again we boarded the train, though getting on this time at the edge of the city, riding it all the way back to the core, where we first entered nearly thirty-six hours prior. My evening was spent sleeping, mainly, with some eating and showering thrown in for good measure. I'm sure much the same can be said of Rick.

    Between my two cameras (DSLR in my backpack and a point-and-shoot in my bar bag) I grabbed just over two-hundred photos across two days and two-hundred sixty kilometres astride a friend, each of us on two wheels powered only by what we were willing to supply with our own effort. It is an experience I am wanting to repeat as soon as I possibly can, and would recommend to anybody that is physically able to.

    Didn't see any bears though. Rather, didn't see hardly any wildlife at all! Spread throughout the two days were a handful of deer, but as we encounter them so much within the city anyway, it wasn't really noteworthy for us. Next time I'm sure we'll see a bear though...
     
  8. Malvolio

    Malvolio .

    Joined:
    14 Dec 2003
    Posts:
    4,632
    Likes Received:
    178
    Oh yes, have a couple updated pictures of my tricross taken along my ride home that describes rather well the intended purpose of the bicycle:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Hamish

    Hamish New Member

    Joined:
    25 Nov 2002
    Posts:
    3,649
    Likes Received:
    4
    so.. stuck cranks, any tips?

    long story:
    bottom bracket is knackered, lots of creaking and grinding under power, cant find any info on what the axle length is though so i figure ill just pull it out and look/measure
    acquire isis crank puller (yes its an isis bb ;)) but the fecking cranks will not budge, at all
    im like 99% sure im doing it right, thread outer thingy into the crank then screw in the inner plunger and it should push the crank off the axle but it wont move
    in fact i rounded off the bit where the crank puller joins its handle trying to get the ****er to move
    tried giving it a tap with a mallet
    tried giving it a good whack with a mallet :D
    gave it a good squirt of wd40 and left it for now but wtf :(
    have ordered a new (park tools this time) crank puller anyway
     
  10. Malvolio

    Malvolio .

    Joined:
    14 Dec 2003
    Posts:
    4,632
    Likes Received:
    178
    Sounds like you've either bought a rather cheap puller, or have a really stuck crankset (in the shop I encounter cranks so tightly secured to their bottom bracket spindle that I'll end up pulling all the threads out of the arm before the crank will budge all the time).

    Next time you give it a try apply flame to the crank arm. Don't go overboard, just enough to get the crank nice and toasty, then, having installed your crank puller previously, try and pull the crank off.
     
  11. Hamish

    Hamish New Member

    Joined:
    25 Nov 2002
    Posts:
    3,649
    Likes Received:
    4
    ah hah, fire of course! when a hammer fails fire is really the only option :cool:

    it was like an £8 crank puller from superstar but their stuff is usually ok
    the threads on the crank itself seem fine, just couldnt get enough leverage/force to actually move it :\
     
  12. GeorgeStorm

    GeorgeStorm Aggressive PC Builder

    Joined:
    16 Dec 2008
    Posts:
    6,132
    Likes Received:
    266
    Malvolio, looks like an awesome trip.
    What kinda speeds were you riding for most of it?

    Edit:
    Can anyone recommend pedals/shoes?
    Am thinking of getting some clipless ones for commuting
     
  13. Malvolio

    Malvolio .

    Joined:
    14 Dec 2003
    Posts:
    4,632
    Likes Received:
    178
    No idea. Most likely about 20kph for the majority of it, but without either of us having any way to track such things it is merely a guess.
     
  14. Jipa

    Jipa Avoiding the "I guess.." since 2004

    Joined:
    5 Feb 2004
    Posts:
    6,363
    Likes Received:
    125
    Got a friend of mine to take a couple of piccies:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Annnnd that's a wrap. Superb fun, although it was way too hot for my liking.
     
  15. steveo_mcg

    steveo_mcg New Member

    Joined:
    26 May 2005
    Posts:
    5,841
    Likes Received:
    80
    My mate and i did an overnighter in the Borders on Friday to test out our gear for our Highlands trip in August. Lovely sunny night though still need to do something about my bivvy gear I was bloody freezing through the night.


    Not up to Malvolio pics but...
    [​IMG]
    IMG_3900 by steveo_mcg, on Flickr

    [​IMG]
    IMG_3894 by steveo_mcg, on Flickr


    Mountain bikes, not ideal for touring...
    [​IMG]
    IMG_3907 by steveo_mcg, on Flickr

    [​IMG]
    IMG_3910 by steveo_mcg, on Flickr
     
  16. Malvolio

    Malvolio .

    Joined:
    14 Dec 2003
    Posts:
    4,632
    Likes Received:
    178
    Very cool, Steveo! Very nice kit you two have there, but one of the biggest things I can recommend having done a new nights out in the woods over the years: keep warm, keep comfortable. If you're planning to spend multiple days in the saddle it is paramount that you keep yourself as comfortable as you can during your downtime. I use an ultra-compact -15 degree sleeping bag for just that purpose with a nice little 1.5" self-inflating foam mat and a big, inflatable pillow (with a foam insert). More space and weight than absolutely needed, but gives me a fantastic nights sleep, which I will happily take the penalty in trade for.

    What kind of distances are you guys covering?
     
  17. steveo_mcg

    steveo_mcg New Member

    Joined:
    26 May 2005
    Posts:
    5,841
    Likes Received:
    80
    The sleeping bag I'm using was adequate last year though that was in a small one man tent, I think the heat problem form the last couple of time has been from being much higher than i used the tent at combined with it being a little bit colder any way. I should have got a good down bag but i'm too cheap.

    We're only doing about 30-40 miles a day for 4 days, but its 90% off road and mostly on walkers paths so its pretty slow/hard going, beside that we both discovered at the weekend we are no where near as fit as we thought....
     
  18. Cookie Monster

    Cookie Monster Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    27 Aug 2003
    Posts:
    4,000
    Likes Received:
    253
    Steveo, is that an 07 Giant Trance and a Cube?

    I've finally bothered myself to start riding again. Pretty sad for a guy who works in a bike shop, but I've not rode properly since Feb 2010 (I do ride to work everyday and sometimes throw in an extra mile on the mile run I already do to work, but I don't count this as riding properly).

    Went out with a good riding buddy and did 20 miles, all mainly off road and I'm suprised to say I did ok. I kept up with him the whole was round which is suprising as I usually use him when the pace of others is slowing a bit and I want a quicker pace through the ride.

    Hoping to get back out again on Friday is his missus is out of hospital and he doesn't have to go visit her. Finges crossed.
     
  19. steveo_mcg

    steveo_mcg New Member

    Joined:
    26 May 2005
    Posts:
    5,841
    Likes Received:
    80
    Its an older Giant Reign and a Genesis Altitude. The Giant is my buddy's, one hard tail and one full sus can lead to some interesting moments. The last time we were out the path was a bit rocky but other wise straight and fairly flat, i'm trying to pick a line which won't kill me he is just gliding over the stuff...

    If your ever up in the borders let me know and I'll come down to Glentress, i'm pretty rubbish at downy bits but don't mind a slow ride up.
     
  20. Picarro

    Picarro New Member

    Joined:
    9 Jun 2009
    Posts:
    3,331
    Likes Received:
    134
    Hi knowledgable bike people. I want to get into the bike-riding community, but alas, for that to happen I need a bike. I have been looking at a Bianchi Vento racing bike, since it would suit me well for commuting to school and riding to my GF where I need to have my bike in the train and it's a pain in the butt with my current steel mountainbike that weighs a ton.
    I found this one on a danish website selling used bikes - could you tell me whether it would be suitable for a person of my height (180 cm) and weight (72 kg)?
    I would ofcourse try it out first and probably try to negotiate the price down to around 300£ instead of the 420£ he is asking.

    If this seems like a rubbish choice, please be free to enlighten me though I would prefer buying used.

    http://www.dba.dk/herreracer-bianchi-vento/id-76358664/

    Model: Bianchi Vento 602
    Size: 174-180 cm
    Gears: 14
     

Share This Page