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Education We Like to Ride Bicycles

Discussion in 'General' started by RTT, 8 May 2008.

  1. Malvolio

    Malvolio .

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    Nice find, shame on the price though. Given that the bike is quite old and some bits do seem as though they're starting to show their age (cables and such) that is a bit higher of a price than I would be willing to pay, especially considering one could acquire a new bike (albeit on the cheaper side of things) for roughly the same price, which would come with a warranty and a shop to stand behind it.

    I'd keep looking, personally.
     
  2. Picarro

    Picarro New Member

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    Thanks for the tip - I've come across another one which would suit me better. It's not as "racy" as the Bianchi, but I think it would suit me better for running in the city/commuting to school.

    http://www.dba.dk/herreracer-centurion-54-cm/id-76423324/
     
  3. Malvolio

    Malvolio .

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    No worries. And yeah, that new one you've found looks well better - it's what I would go with anyway!

    As an aside, anybody seen the new Surly Moonlander? 4.5" of rubber between your legs. Sounds like my kind of bike! Was hoping to get a Pugsley for this winter, but I may just end up waiting on this new one to come out now...
     
  4. Sketchee

    Sketchee Suddenly, looters! Hundreds of 'em!

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    Recommend me a bike?

    EDIT: :wallbash: why couldn't I find this thread when searching :wallbash:

    How do bit-tech! As the title suggests I'm in the market for a new bike (of the push variety, not motorised).

    Took a trip to the local halfords at the weekend but to be honest I'm none the wiser as to what's good and what's not. I'm not going to be doing any extreme downhilling or anything, it'll just be for general purpose, keeping fit means etc. Mostly gonna be used off road and cross country, I visit cannock chase pretty often and am not really a fan of road biking - should I be looking at a proper mountain bike or a hybrid?

    Don't intend to spend a fortune, everything I've looked at so far has been £200 or less, but I'm never averse to paying for a bit of quality :)

    Im sure there are plenty of avid bikers on here, any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

    Cheers!
     
    Last edited: 1 Aug 2011
  5. DLDeadbolt

    DLDeadbolt Space Cadet

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    Oooo....

    Same thing, except I'm looking for a road/pathways bike, with a little offroad (dirt paths, etc)
     
  6. steveo_mcg

    steveo_mcg New Member

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    @Sketchee You'll struggle to get a 'decent' bike for less than £300 if your doing actual mountain biking then you'll probably looking at >£500 get something that'll last more than your first trip. If its just non road paths then see below.

    @DLDeadbolt I usually recommend bike like Edinburgh Bicycle's Courier range, these are sturdy, reliable and usually with 26" wheels so you could fit semi slicks for dirt paths etc. I'm sure Trek or the like will do something similar.

    Thought the best thing to do is go ask your local bike shop (not Halfords!)
     
  7. Sketchee

    Sketchee Suddenly, looters! Hundreds of 'em!

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    Cheers for the advice. It won't be proper mountain biking, just off road and probably off the beaten track a bit, but nothing too challenging.

    Something along the lines of >>this<<. What are your thoughts?
     
  8. Sketchee

    Sketchee Suddenly, looters! Hundreds of 'em!

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    Shameless bump :blush: my question appears to have got a bit lost after being moved to this mammoth thread
     
  9. Malvolio

    Malvolio .

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    Meant to reply, but sort of forgot - sorry!

    Great choice though! You're going with a big manufacturer, and despite the very entry-level orientation of the bike, it has a solid, reliable build kit. It's well suited to what you have in mind.
     
  10. Sketchee

    Sketchee Suddenly, looters! Hundreds of 'em!

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    Thanks for the replies. Yea entry-level around that price I guess is really what I'm looking at, as I say I doubt I'll be pushing it particularly hard, at least to begin with anyway. I just wanted to make sure I got something pretty solid and reliable - any other suggestions within a similar range?

    A friend told me to look at a few of these as possibilities, any thoughts?

    http://www.leisurelakesbikes.com/product/trek3500mountainbike2011-sale.aspx?&id=14281

    http://www.tredz.co.uk/.Land Rover-...ail-Mountain-Bike-2010-Hardtail-MTB_32073.htm

    http://paulscycles.co.uk/products.php?plid=m1b0s2p2483

    http://www.jejamescycles.co.uk/mongoose-rockadile-alx-hydraulic-disc-id58459.html

    http://www.dalescycles.com/productdetails.asp?productid=52869
     
  11. Jipa

    Jipa Avoiding the "I guess.." since 2004

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    I've had a major hedfuk whenever changing the tyres, and finally took a shot of my rim.
    [​IMG]

    Is this normal? It has freaking 4 mm thick walls and is high as hell, there's absolutely no way of getting the tyre on or off without cursing a lot.
     
  12. Cookie Monster

    Cookie Monster Well-Known Member

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    Washing up liquid on the back of the bead ;)
     
  13. Jipa

    Jipa Avoiding the "I guess.." since 2004

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    Yeah I suppose I have to try something new when the next time comes (pretty soon, going by the state of the tyres). Just blew the rear one hopping down some stairs, walked 7 km back home, but even during the long walk was just pissed about how much it's going to suck to try and replace the tube :D I'm really, really desperate for any easier method.
     
  14. Hamish

    Hamish New Member

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    get folding/kevlar/aramid bead tyres instead of wire/steel
    its approximately 3 million times easier to swap folding tyres compared to wire
     
  15. Malvolio

    Malvolio .

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    @Sketchee: stick with the Specialized. As it is a larger company, you're going to get more bike for your buck. Not only things, but some of those others you posted are rather dire and are the type that make mechanics like me cry. On a daily basis we get bikes like those in through the door with major issues due to insufficient maintenance routine and lack of bike handling skills (seriously, riding like a hack isn't good for you or your bike), which end up costing the customer more than they originally paid for the bike.

    What I'm really trying to say is that the more you spend now, the less you'll spend down the line, as bits won't wear out or break quite as easily. Sticking to a large, international manufacturer is another good bet, as you'll get better for cheaper. But as a starting point, that Hardrock is hard to beat, and we have issues keeping them in the store through the summer due to the demand for them (not that specific model, as it isn't one my shop carries, but a similar one). I would very heartily recommend it.

    If you keep trying to find other options (good on ya for that), then keep well away from "me too" brands (that "Land Rover Experience" rubbish is a good example), or smaller niche companies, as they'll cut every corner possible without the knowledge to still make the bike ridable and enjoyable. Remember: big brands do hand-me-down schemes, wherein their older top-end models are their newer low to mid-range models. Today's entry-level bike is yesterdays elite race bike (more or less). You don't get this with smaller companies (or "me-too" brands), as they're liable to just grab a pre-fab Taiwanese frame out of a catalogue and get it painted up to whatever they want with whatever components they can get most cheaply. There is no engineering, skill, or craftsmanship put into these; their only reason for existence is to be as cheap, bland and anonymous as possible to serve as many brands as possible.

    Keep away from that however and you'll be hard pressed to go wrong.


    @Jipa: nice rim you have there. What you describe (depth and width) are two key factors in the function of the rim. Width of the side-walls where the bead hooks in aides in preventing pinch-flats (captures more of the tube/tyre between the metal and whatever you've just hit). Secondly, depth can serve two roles. First would be strength by merit of just there being more material (and a whole heck of a lot of other technical jargon); second would be to aide in keeping the tyre from rolling off by capturing more of the bead within the confines of the rim proper.

    If you've some trouble mounting and dismounting the tyre, try these simple steps. All you need are two plastic tyre levers (wider the better), and a slippery liquid of some sort - occasionally (I just typically use water, but most anything will do).

    Mount by slipping a single bead over the rim, then slowly inserting the tube - starting at the valve, tucking the rubber into the casing of the tyre as you go along (a little bit of air in the tube will help. Orient yourself directly opposite the valve with the wheel resting on a counter at about waist level, open side of the tyre facing up; begin tucking the bead into the rim closest to you (so: opposite the valve), working your way around to the valve with both sides simultaneously. When at the valve, if you find the tyre's bead just won't "fit" in easily, reach down opposite the valve and press the tyre towards the centre of the rim (imagine yourself "pinching" the tyre and pulling it away from the side of the rim you're working the bead onto). Then try running the bead over the rim once more. If this still isn't quite getting it, apply your liquid and try again. Certain combinations may require the usage of your tyre levers to gently pry the tyre onto the rim, but be extremely careful of the tube within the tyre, as it will tear open if you pry the tyre whilst resting your tool atop the tube pressed against the rim.

    Unmounting is exactly the opposite, but with an added step. Begin by deflating the tube as much as you can, then pinch the tyre bit by bit, working it side to side within the rim. This serves to "unhook" the bead from the rim, allowing one to more easily remove it. Then simply grab the tyre and work it off, starting at the valve. If tight, slowly and gently pry the bead out using two tyre levers, one either side of the valve, no more than five inches apart from each other. Once the bead is off in the one place, slowly work your way around the entire circumference of the rim either with your hand or the tyre lever. Once again, your slippery liquid may come in handy for one or all the steps above.

    If you've further issues, see one of the many handy YouTube video's posted around the internet, or take up quilting. Your choice.
     
    Sketchee likes this.
  16. Sketchee

    Sketchee Suddenly, looters! Hundreds of 'em!

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    Cheers for your advice Malvolio, very much appreciated

    Was pretty set on the Specialized anyway, looks far and away the nicest of the lot. Just gotta take a trip down to the bike store this saturday and have a play!
     
  17. DLDeadbolt

    DLDeadbolt Space Cadet

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  18. mars-bar-man

    mars-bar-man Side bewb.

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    First ride out in nearly a year and it's an utterly glorious day, absolutely beautiful..

    ...and I get a puncture 10 miles into the ride.. Bugger... Although I've remembered why I love the West Country so much:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Not the best photos.. but you get the idea..
     
  19. chrisb2e9

    chrisb2e9 Dont do that...

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  20. awok3N

    awok3N Who dares wins.

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    Why hello there relevant to my interest thread =)

    Been a bike mech for going 6 years myself here in the gritty land of Norway, I'll try to pop in here from time to time.

    salut
     

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