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Education We Like to Ride Bicycles

Discussion in 'General' started by RTT, 8 May 2008.

  1. Ramble

    Ramble Ginger Nut

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    Heh, if I can find them for £300 I'm getting them.
     
  2. RTT

    RTT #parp

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    You don't need to spend £1500 on a road bike to get to work on really, unless you just want something bling for the hell of it - which is ok :D But £300-750 will do you nicely, depending on the level of bits you want, and/or longevity for if road riding becomes a hobby for you.

    I agree with what has already been said for disc brakes on road bikes - don't bother :thumb: Can you even get them with discs?

    I'd be buying a previous year Spesh Allez (or anything of that level/price from one of the big manufs) :thumb:
     
    Last edited: 11 Jan 2009
  3. Ramble

    Ramble Ginger Nut

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    I wouldn't bother getting a road bike for commuting, get a hybrid. Road bikes are meant for fun or racing - as such they're built for it, you may find the geometry unforgiving.
     
  4. DougEdey

    DougEdey I pwn all your storage

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    How do you mean "the geometry unforgiving"?
     
  5. Malvolio

    Malvolio .

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    Painful, and not designed for a gingerly cruise to work.

    Seriously, get a bike that fits you, and has the gearing you are capable of pushing. Then get a couple sets of tires (play around with it a bit, complete slick, semi-slick, and full on mudders).

    Honestly, if you've got that kind of budget, there is no reason to get just one bike, but you could get one hell of a bike for that kind of cash.

    If you're going for style, think of getting a proper old-school style cruiser. They look awesome, and will take the rigors of commuting without issue. But gearing may be an issue. Then get a nice weekend warrior mountain bike, or roadie, whatever floats your boat.

    For the ultimate commuter, look at getting a proper fixie. Should only cost you a couple hundred quid, and you'd be set, as they're dead simple, and proper reliable.
     
  6. Ramble

    Ramble Ginger Nut

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    You're stretched on a road bike, everything is geared towards maximum efficiency. As such they're not as comfortable to commute on and you'll feel the potholes a lot more.
    Although, you can't beat drop handlebars for comfort, lots of positions to chose from.
     
  7. FIBRE+

    FIBRE+ Active Member

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    Single speed is a good idea... simpler bike, low maintainance\less to go wrong, more for your money.

    Trek Soho S - £400 RRP - Nice nippy responsive ride (had a go on one), enough clearance for wider tyres, mudguards and rack. Flip flop hub on the rear so can fit a different size gear on either side and turn the wheel around depending on what type of riding (cummuting\bike ride etc).

    [​IMG]


    Or go for a sports hybrid, it basically fits in between normal hybrids and road bikes. Normally a mix of road and hybrid\mtb parts, and the same with the geometry, not so upright as a hybrid but a bit better set up to get the power down. Reasonably light but tough enough for general use.

    Trek 7.5FX - £550 RRP - Nice nippy responsive ride, enough clearance for wider tyres, mudguards and rack. Good quality lightweight parts and frame, carbon fork which is light and absorbs shock.
    [​IMG]


    Treks can sometimes cost a tad more but they're well made and you get lifetime warranty on the frame and 5 years on any Bontrager parts and they're really good with support\waranty too :)


    Swap out the tyres for some Schwalbe Marathons (one of the best puncture protective commuter\winter tyres), get some mudguards, rack, panniers and you're sorted.
     
  8. Chr!s

    Chr!s New Member

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    New Front Lights - A Mini Project

    My old Cateye front light fell off on a ride home last week, and got run over by a couple of cars :sigh:

    So I decided to try something a bit different.

    I ordered 2x of these Infini Compact Hyperlight LED | Buy Online | ChainReactionCycles.com and decided I wanted to mount them to my forks, bit like a adventure BMW GS kind-a-thing.

    The main issue to overcome was the clamps being too small for the diameter of the fork tube.

    [​IMG]




    Had a good rummage around my boxes of bits from various hobbies and found a a couple of lengths of M3 studding and lock nuts.


    [​IMG]

    Perfect fit with a slight bend.

    [​IMG]

    Then to do the same on the other side.

    [​IMG]

    The final result when switched on.

    [​IMG]

    Awesome :thumb:

    The new handlebar light is one of these Electron Micro 5 Front LED EHP216 | Buy Online | ChainReactionCycles.com

    A quick video with all 3 switched on constant and flashing (enough to cause a fit!) :lol:
    http://www.ipulse.co.uk/mtb/lights.wmv
     
  9. RTT

    RTT #parp

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    Depends how far you're riding and on what kind of roads tbh
     
  10. DougEdey

    DougEdey I pwn all your storage

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    10 miles, not the best condition roads, quite a lot of small potholes
     
  11. Ramble

    Ramble Ginger Nut

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    Really it's not a question of the road conditions or distance - but do you enjoy cycling and will you go out on recreational rides?
     
  12. DougEdey

    DougEdey I pwn all your storage

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    Yes, but I don't think I would on that bike, for me recreation would be to go off to the new forest on a proper off roader or to some of the local woods and stuff
     
  13. Ramble

    Ramble Ginger Nut

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    Then I wouldn't get a road bike.
     
  14. B1GBUD

    B1GBUD ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ Accidentally Funny

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    I have a pair of Marzocchi Shiver DC's (2003) and are long overdue a service:eeek:. Can anyone recommend an approved service agent in the south-east?(preferably near Guildford)

    I'd also like to get my rear Fox Vanilla serviced as well but not sure if I can get them both done under one roof.

    Any advice welcome!
     
  15. trigger

    trigger Procrastinator

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    Not sure about official service agents (my brother does mine and his own forks), but as far as local (Guildford-ish) bike shops go I can certainly recommend Cycleworks in Burpham and also (a little far out maybe) Mountain Trax in Barkham.
     
  16. FIBRE+

    FIBRE+ Active Member

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    Stendec and TF will service most stuff and have good reputation and service, I think Stendec might be cheaper though. You could just buy some fork oil and seals for the forks as Marz are very easy to service, or any decent local bike shop would do it. Send the rear shock off though.

    Stendec

    TF Tuned
     
  17. Jamie

    Jamie ex-Bit-Tech code junkie

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    TF Tuned gets good recommendations - you can't go wrong with them.
     
  18. B1GBUD

    B1GBUD ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ Accidentally Funny

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    Thanks guys, I've been to Cycleworks before and the seem like a nice bunch:thumb:.

    I'd prefer to keep it local to keep costs to a minimum (I can ride it there rather than dismantling and sending it) but I might give TF a call to check out their costs.

    Thanks again! :D
     
  19. Jamie

    Jamie ex-Bit-Tech code junkie

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    I want one of these

    [​IMG]

    or one of these

    [​IMG]
     
  20. Ramble

    Ramble Ginger Nut

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    The Charge is a lovely bit of kit. Put some drop handlebars on and some clipless pedals and you're good to go.
     

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