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Education We Like to Ride Bicycles

Discussion in 'General' started by RTT, 8 May 2008.

  1. CrapBag

    CrapBag Well-Known Member

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    No one, I need to buy one ASAP
     
  2. legoman

    legoman breaker of things

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  3. Wakka

    Wakka Yo, eat this, ya?

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    Just ordered a pair of these (in 27.5"), looking at reviews they seem to be about as good as you can get for rolling resistance, lightweight too.

    If you want a bit more grip, go for the Ralph :thumb:
     
  4. Vault-Tec

    Vault-Tec Green Plastic Watering Can

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    Houston, we have a problem..



    It sounds like a friggin rollercoaster. Oh, and don't wear headphones because the brake is lethal.

    I spent a lot of time scratching my head, but I think I have worked it out. Now that the drive train has had 18st pulling on it it has bedded in. And when I put pressure on the drive train the chain pulls away from the rear sprocket. The reason for this is that the BB I was sold is simply far too wide. It is for a trials bike. So to fix the error the seller sold me some spacers but they are not big enough. The drive sprocket needs to move over at least 10mm. As of now the chain is touching the frame. That is not what is causing the noise though, that is simply because the alignment is all out of whack.

    The solution? a new BB. Cost? about £18. It could be worse.. It could have involved a new rear hub, getting the wheel relaced and so on. If the drive train was where it should be the chain would be nowhere near the frame. It should ride inside it, closer to the rear wheel.

    Thankfully everything else is spot on, and it is bloody fast.
     
  5. CrapBag

    CrapBag Well-Known Member

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    Bought a continental traffic 2 locally, feel a little bit ripped off as I paid £22 for it but I was in the shop and felt awkward not to buy it. was told it was Kevlar inside is that not correct then?

    Its fixed the wobble I had on the back wheel but now I notice a sort of metallic ringing seemingly from the freewheel.

    There's slight movement right to left on the rear sprocket but its not much.

    I hope I'm not looking at replacing the rear wheel and possible the sprocket too as this will probably mean the end to my cycling for now as I just cant afford to replace them.
     
  6. Mr_Mistoffelees

    Mr_Mistoffelees The Lunatic on the Grass.

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    I'm sure Continental wouldn't be shy about it if it did have a Kevlar belt but, no mention on their own website: https://www.continental-tires.com/bicycle/tyres/mountainbike-tyres/traffic

    I think you've been lied to.
     
  7. fix-the-spade

    fix-the-spade Well-Known Member

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    Kevlar bead tyres are floppy and are almost always packaged and sold folded up to save space.

    Wire bead tyres hang on a rack because they can't be folded up. If the tyre came in a small box it's probably kevlar, if it holds it's shape without a wheel or tube holding it up then it's definitely wire bead and a shop rat owes you an explanation.
     
  8. CrapBag

    CrapBag Well-Known Member

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    So I rang him and he told me that it has Kevlar in it but only for puncture protection all the tyres with a Kevlar bead would be more expensive.

    Regarding my other issue I have since removed all the bearings, cleaned all the races and the bearings themselves and then regreased and reassembled and it sounds a lot better.

    I just need to buy the tools to remove the cassette (if that's what I have) and the free wheel so I can adjust the spindle properly as I don't think I have it central, the disc is rubbing on the brake pads and I cant adjust it properly with the cassette on.

    I need to work out what free wheel I have to get the right tool.
     
  9. Mr_Mistoffelees

    Mr_Mistoffelees The Lunatic on the Grass.

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    The bike shop man still seems to be telling porkies. As I said before Continental wouldn't be shy about it if the tyre had a Kevlar belt. Take a look at this to see what I mean: https://www.continental-tires.com/bicycle/tyres/city-trekking-tyres/contact
     
  10. CrapBag

    CrapBag Well-Known Member

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    I think I will be having words tomorrow.

    Might even throw in an email to continental for back up.

    For what I do on my bike the tyre is probably enough but I don't like being lied to especially as I seem to be able to get a tyre with Kevlar in for the same price.

    Edit fired continental an email, if I have been lied to its the last time I use that shop, try to help a local business only to get screwed, also I expected to pay more but 50% more is a little ridiculous.
     
    Last edited: 25 Apr 2018
  11. legoman

    legoman breaker of things

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    Pretty sure Conti use Vectran or poly breaker, neither are Kevlar an theres nothing about it on traffics either.
    To be honest though you can avoid most punctures with a little bit of looking at the road, Ive been running Vittoria tublars on my summer road bike wheels without issue an they have very little in the way of protection. They are blindingly fast though.
     
  12. CrapBag

    CrapBag Well-Known Member

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    Got a refund today.

    My bro in law has steered me towards the following and I'm about to pull the trigger.

    Cheap and cheerful? Mixed reviews.

    Or I will probably just order a traffic online and save myself £7, give me some spare change for tools.
     
  13. CrapBag

    CrapBag Well-Known Member

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    Bought two Continental traffic 2's in the end, plus I ordered a chain whip and a 15mm cone spanner.

    I need to get a freewheel tool, my rear sprocket is a Shimano MF-TZ31 so I know I need a FR1 tool but the ones on ebay don't specify this.

    Either of these suitable?

    Choice 1

    Choice 2

    I'm also thinking about removing the locking ring so I can dismantle the sprocket and clean each cog individually or is this a bad idea?
     
  14. Wakka

    Wakka Yo, eat this, ya?

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    Shimano have used the same standard freehub pattern for years now, so either of those would be fine.

    It's that tool that removes the cassette lockring (along with the chain whip) and allows the cassette to be removed from the freehub body. It's never a bad idea to remove the entire gear block and give it a proper clean - as well check the freehub body for damage and apply some grease to the splines so the cassette doesn't seize onto it in the future :thumb:
     
  15. CrapBag

    CrapBag Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, ordered the slightly dearer one.

    Can't wait to get it all up and running again, haven't ridden for a week and my left leg has started to get more painful again which is usually down to lack of use.
     
  16. CrapBag

    CrapBag Well-Known Member

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    New tyres fitted today and back spindle etc tightened properly as I can tell from you tube videos.

    Bearings feel smooth if rotated by hand but the rear wheel isn't spinning as freely as the front and is ever so slightly noisy.

    Edit....found the cause myself the rear brake disc was rubbing on the calliper, loosened the two allen bolts applied the brake and tightened back up, wheel spins lovely and freely now although the rear bearings a are a little grumbly. More grease or just worn bearings/freewheel?

    Conti tyres feel so much nicer than my old ones, quieter and smoother.
     
    Last edited: 1 May 2018
  17. legoman

    legoman breaker of things

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    Id try more grease to start
     
  18. Mr_Mistoffelees

    Mr_Mistoffelees The Lunatic on the Grass.

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    Set the hub so that there is a very tiny amount of play when it is out of the frame so that, when the QR skewer is tightened, the clamping force takes out the last little bit of play and the hub runs smoothly and freely.
     
  19. CrapBag

    CrapBag Well-Known Member

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    Hopefully that's what I did, I'm gonna strip it out again and go crazy with the grease tomoz.

    Gonna strip the cassette if my tools arrive tomoz too, bit daunted by that although I'll take anything apart if I have the right tools.
     
    Mr_Mistoffelees likes this.
  20. mnpctech

    mnpctech bit-tech sponsor

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    One of my Bucket List items was recording Erik Noren from Peacock Groove build one of his custom bicycles.

     

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