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Education We Like to Ride Bicycles

Discussion in 'General' started by RTT, 8 May 2008.

  1. Cookie Monster

    Cookie Monster Well-Known Member

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    Been there, done that.

    Car busy overtaking me moved in to let an oncoming car passed. He pushed me into a wing mirror of a parked car (which i ripped clean off), then continued to drive away.

    Turned the front wheel into the drivers side wheel arch, bending my wheel to 90deg in the process, which stopped the bike moving and sent me flying (on looker reckoned 10-15 feet) onto my head.

    One trip to hospital for a busted head and a fit nurse later I was back at work.

    And the lesson, wear a helmet.
     
  2. Twisty

    Twisty :-)

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    It's there to be laughed at :lol: Helmetcam stuff does always looks slower and tamer than real life - that was reasonably steep, fast and rutted. But basically I wasn't paying attention and went down like a sack of spuds :duh

    It probably doesn't help that I never pre-ride the course either, which has caused a few 1st lap blunders. Once I bent my forks on the first lap and had to ride the remaining 2.5 laps on a negative rake bike.

    What is Aston like now? I probably last rode around there about 5 years ago, I think they had just set up the dual slalom course there. It was wet and the mud there is really slippy - lots of two wheel drift action - was a lot of fun.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: 2 Oct 2010
  3. 13eightyfour

    13eightyfour Formerly Titanium Angel

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    I finally got a bit of a ride in last night, mainly roads but some farm track also. Ive decided that i need to ride more and tbh im a little bored of the mssile im running atm, so im thinking about going for a steel framed 'all round' bike to replace it.
    I dont want to spend big money so the 2/3 im looking at are the rock lobster 853 and On-one inbred/456, they all seem to have good reviews and loads of fans.

    Has anybody had or ridden either? im looking for any opinions really.

    Ive found a custom frame builder in a village just down the road that runs courses to build your own frame but hes fully booked till 2012 but im seriously considering signing up and then ill eventually have my own 'homemade' custom frame. I could order a frame from him but that wouldnt be any fun and quite expensive.
     
  4. Cookie Monster

    Cookie Monster Well-Known Member

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    Who's the frame builder? There was one locally to me called Dave Yates and he moved a few years back and now runs something like you described close to some RAF base I think. If it is Dave he's very frikkin good at what he does, was an ok rider as far as I know too. Think his buddy was called Joe Waugh.
     
  5. 13eightyfour

    13eightyfour Formerly Titanium Angel

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    It is indeed Dave Yates! hes at conningsby now, which does have an RAF base, its about 5-10 mins from me so would be ideal really. Ive always wanted to build my own frame and whilst my metal skills arent too shabby, they're quite away off being able to start from scratch, So its nice to know it should be a worthwhile experience!
     
  6. ridiculous

    ridiculous New Member

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  7. Cookie Monster

    Cookie Monster Well-Known Member

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    From the frames i've seen built by him it will be well worth it, as far as I remember though it's not cheap. I got a Marin painted by him once before I worked in a bike shop, then got his shop (M Steels) to re-built the bike, they scratched the **** outta the frame. I was not a happy bunny.
     
  8. 13eightyfour

    13eightyfour Formerly Titanium Angel

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    The price for the course is £849+ materials/consumables, he estimates materials/consumables start at around £170 so i think around £1200-1400 should cover it. Which may sound expensive, but to me it doesnt seem too bad considering you get the whole experience of building a frame to my specs and then get to take it home and ride the **** out of it :thumb:

    Id love to learn enough to be able to maybe build more experimental stuff after the course for my personal use.
     
  9. Cookie Monster

    Cookie Monster Well-Known Member

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    Your setting your sights too low, can you say titanium?
     
  10. 13eightyfour

    13eightyfour Formerly Titanium Angel

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    Sadly while id love to have a go at something a little more exotic the only tubing options are Reynolds 525, 631 and 853 but NOT 953.

    Still at least it makes it cheaper for me to experiment at home when ive learnt stuff.
     
  11. wst

    wst Active Member

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    Ok, I'd like to get a bike for my thrice-weekly 13 mile (each way, one hill which isn't that big) commute to college. I'd also like it to be something upon which I could give the local racers a run for their money (drop bars?).

    But, of course, I'm skint-ish (I have ~£200 to my (Student) name) which is not enough to get a road bike, so I asked my dad if he'd buy my a bike for Christmas if I chip in a bit of money for it. So... the budget is £300-400 tops (and I'd like to buy SPD's while I'm at it), but I have no idea what's 'good' at this price range.

    My LBS sells Claud Butler, Dawes, Raleigh, Land Rover, and a few other MTB type brands.

    So what's good at that kind of price (or lower!)? Then I can have suggestions to tell my dad :D
     
  12. bagman

    bagman Well-Known Member

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    what about something like this http://www.evanscycles.com/products/scott/sub-40-2010-hybrid-bike-ec020663#reviews

    i have 2 scott road bikes myself a sub20 and a sub35 and i am very happy with both of them

    but make sure you get a proper lock!!! like this is what i got http://www.evanscycles.com/products...4-lock-with-bracket-ec006264?query=kryptonite, some one at he shop i bought it from snapped the key off in the lock when it was attached to the bike and it took them 2 hours with a angle grinder to get it off, so you know that it is going to take some doing to get your bike!!! it might seem expensive but if it is going to keep your bike at the end of the day it is worth it
     
  13. wst

    wst Active Member

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    If my LBS sold it I'd certainly be inclined to buy it. I'm not keen on ordering a bike from the internet that I haven't the chance to try out for size and position. Which, I'm afraid, means there's no chance I'll get it.

    I was thinking more along the 'Road' than 'Hybrid' side of things as well ;)
     
  14. Cookie Monster

    Cookie Monster Well-Known Member

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    Of those I'd only recommend Claud Butler, their road bikes start at about £330 on the Criterium which is very basic with poor shifters, but you could get a "road bike" with flat bars in the Chinook for about £370 I think which has a better gear spec.

    This just what I remember from the Claud Buter book/price list from work (i'm not working today so I'm not 100% sure). There should be some deals to be had on CB's soon as they begin to get rid of their 2010 bikes ready for the 2011 in the new year. With most other brands you have missed the deals as they release their bikes in Aug/Sept ish.
     
  15. Malvolio

    Malvolio .

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    My day-old mud eating machine:

    [​IMG]

    :D I love bikes...
     
  16. Tec_

    Tec_ New Member

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    love the front rack!

    just pics of my bike. i like riding at night. helps to clear my head.




    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  17. wst

    wst Active Member

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    The Chinook is an extremely attractive proposition. One of my friends has some downbars which he removed from his Claud Butler to replace with flat bars because he wanted a less aggressive position for his commute, so he says I can have them for free, with brake levers! :D
     
  18. Jipa

    Jipa Avoiding the "I guess.." since 2004

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    Got my friends Cube LTD whatever for a spin. First time I've driven an XC-bike and damn was it weird :D After riding my Trek Bruiser (dirt bike) around for ages, I felt like I'm just gonna fall on my face on every downhill part :) Also tried hopping up curbs and hit my nuts with the damn saddle.

    I must admit it was a pleasure to pedal up hills, but really, the eye-opening part was that I really, really don't want an XC-bike. Neither do I want a full-blown DH/freeride as that would be overkill. Enduro sits somewhere in the middle, right?
     
  19. Hamish

    Hamish New Member

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    sounds like what you're looking for is a trail bike?
     
  20. Malvolio

    Malvolio .

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    And can also be referred to as "All Mountain", though that is typically a North American term. But anyway, it does seem like that is what you would want: more travel, slacker angles, burlier. As compared to a cross country bike, that is. Just make sure you get yourself a telescoping seatpost, as they're a life-saver, but be warned that versions with a remote are just rubbish: the cable gets in the way, it's exceptionally fiddly to setup and maintain, takes up bar space, did I mention that there is a very long, cumbersome cable constantly in the way? The lever ones are cheaper, and worlds better.
     

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