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Education We Like to Ride Bicycles

Discussion in 'General' started by RTT, 8 May 2008.

  1. Cookie Monster

    Cookie Monster Well-Known Member

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    How long have you ran the new chain on the old cassette? You could have done for the chain again :wallbash:
     
  2. Jipa

    Jipa Avoiding the "I guess.." since 2004

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    I haven't, partly because it never worked to begin with, and partly because it's winter and for the last weeks it's been -30 C here. Also the front wheel needs replacing and I've had absolutely no money for hobbies for as long as I can remember.

    Sorry.
     
  3. format

    format New Member

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    I'm getting new brake pads (front and back) and the cables replaced on both for my bike. They are fitting them for me too. They are charging £35... that's a good deal right?
     
  4. Cookie Monster

    Cookie Monster Well-Known Member

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    Discs or V's? By cables is it just inner or inner and outer?

    If discs it's good as pads usually cost £10+ a pair (usually closer to £15-£20), cables maybe £5 for the pair then labour, so not a bad deal.

    If it's V's, at work in we charge £4.50 per pair of pads, £2 per cable and £5 setup per brake making it £23.

    Depends on where your getting it done. You do realise though that you will need your brakes tweeked again soon as new cables stretch (this may not need doing if the mechanic tried to streatch the cable first, but this depends on the mechanic)
     
  5. Jamie

    Jamie ex-Bit-Tech code junkie

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    One of me from the weekend in Gethin

    [​IMG]
     
    Mik3yB @ CCL likes this.
  6. wst

    wst Active Member

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    Still haven't had the balls to try out the SPD's >_< but I have found that walking in the shoes with cleats fitted sounds like I'm walking on gravel. I guess they're... better than SPD-SL's for walking but it's a tad annoying of course. Might be good for walking on ice!

    Might MTFU and try the pedals this week, it's half term.
     
  7. carpetmonster

    carpetmonster New Member

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    You need to make sure you have them adjusted perfectly to avoid knee pain long term. Whilst you can also get knee pain riding on flats, particularly if you wear long trousers and are turning your leg a bit to avoid them going into the chainset (not always the case but it happens), it is more common using SPD's.

    The ideal position should mimic the natural movement of the leg. Anterior (front) knee pain and patellofemoral pain syndrome are probably the most common complaints in cycling (injuries).

    The most usual pedaling position often causes the tibia to internally rotate whilst your knee is extended. Additionally , medial knee pain can occue when your saddle is at the wrong height.

    The cleat position of SPD's particularly when the toes pointed too far outward will increase internal tibial rotation also.

    So pay close attention to the setting up of the cleats and the saddle height. Also bare in mind if riding off road, SPD's prevent you from shifting your weight and bailing out as easily. On road bikes and general XC and trail riding this is not such a problem. On more technical freeriding and downhill type biking, virtually nobody uses them for the above reasons.

    After years of using SPD's and having a few associated issues, I went over to flats, currently using Wellgo Magnesiums.
     
  8. format

    format New Member

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    V brakes. One of the reason it needs fixed is that the cables are stretched pretty badly already, I'd hope he do it for me. I can ask the guy anyway.

    As for 'inner and outer cables', I'm a little confused. Could you elaborate? (I'm far from knowledgeable when it comes to the technical aspect of bikes)
     
  9. carpetmonster

    carpetmonster New Member

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    Outers are the black (usually) plastic bits over the cables, which sit in eyelets in the frame. The inners are the actual stranded metal cables.
     
  10. wst

    wst Active Member

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    Carpetmonster, indeed I know the risks of the SPDs. Luckily I only have a road bike and a 'crosscountry' bike (I tried it on the Cami Des Cavalls in Menorca and after 300 or so metres of technical stuff over volcanic rock and sharp edges, I decided it wasn't worth the risk to my tyres and knees :p so I won't be doing anything technical or particularly fast off road :))
     
  11. Mik3yB @ CCL

    Mik3yB @ CCL Everything is not going to be OK

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    Anyone used any 2010 or newer Marzocchi forks? What are they like these days?
    I'm currently running Rock Shox Recon 327 which could do with a good seeing to (or a service!) but there's no better time to upgrade whilst I'm looking at the new frame..

    What would you go with Marzocchi 44 RLO for slightly under £200 or Rock Shox Tora 318 at slightly over £150 quid?

    Previously, I had some 'zocchi Bomber Comp ETA 4-5 years ago and they were quite nice. I bought the Recons I have now because they were on sale a couple of years back.
     
  12. Jipa

    Jipa Avoiding the "I guess.." since 2004

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  13. carpetmonster

    carpetmonster New Member

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    I would go with Tora or Recon Solo Air as a minimum. They are essentially cut price Rebas. Are Tora 318 coil or solo air, I think there are two versions. Also Tora and Recon both come in TK versions (coil) with or without Poploc.

    Have a look on Chain Reactions site. I would personally go with the Recon Solo Air as they are almost a pound lighter than the Toras and a bit stronger.
     
  14. Mik3yB @ CCL

    Mik3yB @ CCL Everything is not going to be OK

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    The ones I was looking at were the Solo Air which I think is what my current Recons are.

    Decisions, decisions! :D
     
  15. carpetmonster

    carpetmonster New Member

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    Rockshox, now owned by SRAM are a bit of an industry standard unless you want to spend more and choose between them and Fox. Whilst Marzochi and RST are popular as OEM parts, some of their aftermarket parts are of varying quality.

    Suntour SR actually manufacture a lot of stuff for Fox, as so RST for other firms. But they have a bif of a budget image for their own brand, as their rep is a bit crud, its not in their interest to market high end forks right now.

    In other words, I would stick with Rockshox as their range and prices are good enough to avoid any long term problems.
     
  16. Jamie

    Jamie ex-Bit-Tech code junkie

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    You'd be surprised how many people use them for riding downhill. I use SPDs to race 4X and to ride downhill but when the conditions are loose and pedalling isn't important I usually resort to flats.

    No it didn't on that occasion but I do often get a bit of ass to tyre so I'm pretty used to it. :naughty:

    I'd always choose to get a Fox fork over a Rockshox, their dampers just feel much better. I have Fox f100 on my 4X bike and Fox 32 RL 150mm on my trail bike and both feel great. I've previously had a Reba team and a Pike 454 and whilst they were solid forks, they just don't feel as good as a Fox. I also had problems with the Reba blowing the top oil seal on hard bottom outs.
     
  17. Mik3yB @ CCL

    Mik3yB @ CCL Everything is not going to be OK

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    Have you got any Fox for sale? I'm on a budget!! :waah:
     
  18. FIBRE+

    FIBRE+ Active Member

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    Rock Shox are good right the way through the range but as Jamie says it's worth paying the extra for a set of Fox. It might be worth servicing the Rock Shox (maybe try it yourself?) and wait for a deal on a set of Fox 32, or try Ebay or www.pinkbike.com/buysell

    You might want to go with a Talas fork with lockout so you can set it at 140\150mm for the DH and lower it for general rides so it's a bit snappier on the handling and then use the lockout on long climbs. I managed to get a set of Fox 32 from Chain Reaction for £240 (£700+rrp) a few months back, it's worth checking every so often as they tend to get older stock forks and sell them silly cheap :).
     
  19. Gryphon

    Gryphon New Member

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    You were saying about crazy deals on Chain Reaction?

    http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/SearchResults.aspx?Search=fox+32&InStockOnly=true

    £215 for Fox 32 F100, £254 for Fox 32 Float RL

    (and 4% cashback through quidco... not much but thought i'd mention it)

    Damn I'm tempted :wallbash:

    Edit: how often do these deals come up - is it worth jumping on it while its there or is it likely i'd get the same sort of deal in 6 months?
     
    Last edited: 22 Feb 2011
  20. Cookie Monster

    Cookie Monster Well-Known Member

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    The 32 F11 RL's are tapered, so it goes from 1.5" at the bottom of the steerer to 1 1/8" at the top, this wont fit a standard bike unless you bought something a bit special in the last year or so.

    32 Float RL's and 32 Vanilla's look like 1.5" steerers so your have to either be running a Cannondale or something recent.

    A standard run of the mill bike will need a 1 1/8" steerer.
     

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