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LOL We're in a drought...

Discussion in 'General' started by el2k, 29 Apr 2012.

  1. lp1988

    lp1988 Well-Known Member

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    Why was my first thought on seeing this thread the "must be Aussies"

    But another thought, don't you have any ground water in England ? at least that's where we get most of ours.
     
  2. SuicideNeil

    SuicideNeil New Member

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    Sure, alot of water comes from underground reservoirs ( 'aquifers' ), but our ancient & crumbling sewer and water pipes make the process of collecting and delivering water to where it's needed very... inefficient, shall we say.

    I'm all for the idea of collecting & storing rainwater for flushing toilets with, it's just something you don't see in new builds ( social housing or housing developments ), and isn't something that can easily or cheaply be retro fitted into older properties,- you only see that kind of thing on bespoke homes commissioned by wealthy hippies on Grand Designs; love that show.
     
  3. dancingbear84

    dancingbear84 error 404

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    I agree that it may not be cheap, but it shouldn't be all that difficult to fit to modern or older housing. Most properties only have 1 or 2 downpipes, if both, or either one of these led to an underground tank to store the water there would be masses of savings. Especially if you then moved to a water meter you could probably reduce your monthly payments and the cost of the installation pays for itself in a few years I would imagine.

    Apparently the UK is the only country in Europe that pays a flat rate for water use, unless you are on a meter of course.
     
  4. Porkins' Wingman

    Porkins' Wingman Can't touch this

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    The government and water companies have to plan ahead. The lack of rain over the last two years takes its toll that is not obvious to the lay person but it is such an extreme situation that the national infrastructure isn't capable of accommodating it - it's not worth investing in and maintaining the infrastructure when it's only required once every 40 years (don't underestimate how expensive it would be). So we don't have big enough reserves and we're not equipped to capture so much water in so little time in a month like this.

    Instead, they have to consider that a dry summer would place an increased demand on what are already heavily depleted water reserves. Normally precipitation over the winter months recharges the groundwater aquifers but this didn't happen at all this winter. If that were to happen again in the 2012/13 winter then we'd really be ****ed next year. So they have to introduce measures now to begin managing that possibility.

    Water companies don't have exclusive rights to water - there are limits to how much they can take from the environment. So if reservoir levels are well down then they may not legally be able to fill them all in a short space of time even if there was enough rainfall to do so. Other parties, such as farmers and various industrial processes (many critical to the economy) also have rights to water so just because it suddenly becomes available it doesn't necessarily mean water companies can grab it all.
     
  5. SuicideNeil

    SuicideNeil New Member

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    Oh sure, in principle it's straight forward enough, I'm thinking more about practicality- not every house or block of flats has a large ( or accessible ) garden to bury a tank in, which leaves the loft space for a water tank- if there is a loft. It also means some interesting re-plumbing in order that you can switch to mains water for flushing if the tank runs dry or gets blocked etc*.
    I think it is something that should be compulsory with new builds given the demand for water is only ever going to increase.

    *funny story I heard once- lots of people on a naval base ( I used to work at BRNC in Dartmouth ) somewhere came down with a nasty stomach bug and they couldn't figure out the source as everyone hadn't eaten the same thing over the course of a few days. On a hunch they guessed it might be a water quality issue so they checked the watertank in a roof space and found a dead pigeon in there...
     
  6. dancingbear84

    dancingbear84 error 404

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    That reminds me of the Faulty Towers sketch.

    Ha ha pig-eon how he get in there?
    He flew Manuel.

    I'm not an expert on plumbing but surely it isn't too hard to swap the feed or have a ballcock style system to fill it if required? And I know it is not an option in all situations but high rise flats could incorporate sealed tanks underground before building or on the roof?

    Now the houses that are converted to flats with no garden as mentioned would pose an issue, but if they had seen form of renewable energy, be it solar, or small wind turbines. (and I do realise that this is not going to generate much, if any power) but a lot of little bits is the same as few big bits in my opinion, it would help to reduce emissions etc etc.
    Oh and energy saving bulbs should be mandatory.

    Right highjack over, yes it has been really wet recently. I hope no one was badly flooded. We're on top of hill so no floods but did get a bit of minor wind damage though. Nothing of any real concern fortunately
     

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