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Blogs What I want to see from next-gen motherboards

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by bit-tech, 7 May 2019.

  1. Arboreal

    Arboreal Well-Known Member

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    Definitely 2 M.2 slots please*. I'm happy with one NVMe and one SATA, the data drive doesn't need to be so fast and I'm told the real world difference isn't that huge.
    Happy to lose space hogging SATA power & data cables, and heartily vote for a reduction in the power cabling setup while I'm at it.
    * Particularly AMD ITX that most only have one on. Asrock have 3 M.2 slots on their super tiny Deskmini for goodness sake!
     
  2. Paradigm Shifter

    Paradigm Shifter de nihilo nihil fit

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    I can get behind integrated I/O shields, but less so the rest - especially any more "improvements" to UEFI - the interface on my MSI MEG X399 Creation is so slow to do some things I occasionally worry the BIOS has locked up. Let's go back to simple interfaces, please. Not necessarily as bare as some old BIOSes were, but fewer pointless graphical bits; especially when it just compresses the bit that you actually interact with into about a quarter of the screen.

    Other than that, I'd really like to see a few more boards with the ability to stuff 4 dual-slot GPUs in that don't require Intel LGA2066 or LGA3647 chips.

    Or someone to make an ITX board that is just "a little bit longer" and add two more DIMM slots. I've not got the largest ITX case in the world (Raijintek Metis) and it could handle a board about 15mm deeper OK.
     
  3. liratheal

    liratheal Sharing is Caring

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    I miss the days when boards were seas of green or tan.

    I miss the days when, if you wanted mental colours, you got a DFI board with its neon slots and sockets.

    These days everything looks like radioactive vomit.

    I liked those days. My favourite case was a beige cube I inherited from an uncle. Shitloads of disk space, castors, built out of enough steel to break toes if dropped. Classic.
     
  4. edzieba

    edzieba Virtual Realist

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    Moving to SODIMM is also an option, like ASRock's X299 ITX board. Quad-channel without having to try and standardise a new form-factor.
     
    Paradigm Shifter likes this.
  5. Wakka

    Wakka Yo, eat this, ya?

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    Still better than this horror show:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    It wasn't until the likes of the AW9D-MAX and Lan Party UT-P65-T2R that manufactures really started getting in tune with aesthetics and sensible board layouts, imo.
     
  6. liratheal

    liratheal Sharing is Caring

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    Don't get me wrong, I wasn't a fan of that crap either. I liked the old boards that were tan with beige slots and sockets. Or green with black.

    As I said elsewhere in this thread.

    Give me a board that is function over form in a maximum of three colours with two of those colours being the colour of the heatsinks necessitated by aluminium fins and copper slugs/heatpipes.
     
  7. Paradigm Shifter

    Paradigm Shifter de nihilo nihil fit

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    That's true. I'd forgotten SODIMM as an option.

    Hardly an issue trying to standardise a new form factor, though; the MSI MEG I previously mentioned said it was EATX, when in fact it's ATX with about an extra 12mm hanging over the edge, just enough to make it flex quite frighteningly when applying any pressure (eg: when getting 24-pin connector in if it's being stubborn). In fact, if I'd know it was like that, I'd have bought an ATX case I actually like that it would fit in, rather than the horrorshow EATX compatible monstrosity I ended up getting because when buying kit on work budget in Japan, a) options are a little more limited, b) explaining super-precise requirements to the supplier can be kind of tough and c) I needed it to work first time.
     
  8. edzieba

    edzieba Virtual Realist

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    You've hit on the problem of rolling your own form-factors: if you go for a growth over an existing form-factor, you end up with clearance issues (board hits metal, metal wins). If you go for a shrink, you either end up with board areas flapping in the breeze (hello there trace fatigue failures), or you need to add new propriatery standoff locations (mATX's 'R' and 'S' standoffs) that interfere with larger form factors (if R and S are left in place with an ATX board installed they can short surface traces or crush backside components). Then there's all the hassle of persuading case manufacturers your new wtfbbqATX standard is going to be a Real Big Thing and to retool all their production gear (and user documentation) to handle the new variant, if not design whole new product lines.
    And even then, you need people to actually adopt it. BTX and DTX both flopped even with everything else aligned and large companies (Intel and AMD respectively) pushing for adoption.
     
  9. wolfticket

    wolfticket Downwind from the bloodhounds

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    I'd agree with this, and the same is true with most motherboard software and other hardware tweaking software.
    Many people don't use it all that often, and even those that do would probably be better off with a simple, clear, functional UI. Most of it looks like a half-assed sports car dashboard, and feels like trying to drive a sports car with a mouse.


    Form factor wise, I think moving to MATX with SODIMM as a de-facto standard would make a lot of sense.
     
    Last edited: 9 May 2019
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