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Linux What is this Linux thing?

Discussion in 'Software' started by Glider, 27 Jul 2006.

  1. lp rob1

    lp rob1 New Member

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    One of the other things I hate about Ubuntu is that configuring stuff like login themes is a pain. Canonical have done the same as a pre-build PC manufacturer - taken the software then mutilated it with its own 'logos' and 'artwork'.

    Take for example, Dell. All good when it comes to hardware choice, but the version of Vista on my mum's PC was changed so that there was an annoying mouse glitch every so often. The part of the mouse pointer which does the clicking (aka the tip) sometimes changes to the base of the pointer (the 'stalk'). Without warning, this becomes very frustrating, and sometimes dangerous to open documents.

    Another example is my 5 year old Compaq PC. It originally had Windows XP, and after a few hours of use the thing would freeze. Installed the Vista beta when it came out, and the problem disappeared.

    Canonical - taken Gnome, added custom artwork, made it harder for the advanced user to access functions. OK, Ubuntu is meant to be a user-friendly OS that encourages people to switch from Windoze, but couldn't there be some way to enable it? :grr:
     
  2. Yeoo

    Yeoo Active Member

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    What is the best Linux for a Linux virgin?
     
  3. Blazza181

    Blazza181 SVM PLACENTA CASEI

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    Ubuntu or Mint
     
  4. samual123

    samual123 New Member

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    Linux has been the development of the whole time, like after the distribution based on Linux kernel, and it has been done, because many of the Linux code for a special volunteer work. They do a great job, I hope they will continue to do so, and even Linux will grow stronger in the future.
     
  5. Splooshiba

    Splooshiba Member

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    I started with ubuntu and found it good because of the huge amount of online support for it. Pretty much every problem i came up against loads of other people had reported how to solve it.\

    Il have to give mint a go tho, thanks Blazza
     
  6. CraigWatson

    CraigWatson Level Chuck Norris

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    My vote would go to either Ubuntu or Linux Mint.

    Mint is based on Ubuntu, but I find Mint more useable than Ubuntu 11.10 as I cannot stand Unity/GNOME3 in its default form.

    Mint's take on GNOME3 looks like a compromise between a standard Windows desktop and GNOME2, and I personally love it - I have Mint 12 on my 11" MacBook Air and Ubuntu 11.04 on my desktop PC. Both distributions are binary-compatible, meaning you can install the same software on both distributions.

    HTH :)
     
  7. ShakeyJake

    ShakeyJake My name is actually 'Jack'.

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    I'm really liking what Mint is doing with Mate these days actually/
     
  8. dancingbear84

    dancingbear84 error 404

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    I have dabbled in Ubuntu and Mint, and for me Mint is by far the winner, I used to love Ubuntu back in the day but the new gnome 3 thing just makes me :waah: It is a bit fisher pricey in my opinion. To be fair I was using it on a 12" laptop maybe the desktop variation is better. I want to get more into Linux but I struggle to find the time to learn. Although that goes for everything these days, not enough time in the day.
     
  9. CDomville

    CDomville ^ I am THIS Possum

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    Woo, downloading the most recent image of LMDE! No installs ever again (hopefully) here we come! :D
     
  10. steveo_mcg

    steveo_mcg New Member

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    Thats a good idea, though why not just run Debian Testing?
     
  11. Jace01

    Jace01 Banned

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    10 things Linux does better than OS X
    #1: Flexibility

    If you’ve used OS X, you know it’s user-friendly but not very flexible. In that regard, OS X is very much like Windows: You get what you have and there’s not much you can do with it. If you don’t like the layout of the desktop, you can move the Dock to either side, you can shrink it, or you can make it auto-hide. You can also add third-party applications and themes the desktop. Outside of that, you’re out of luck. Say, for example, you would like to have only the Dock on your desktop (with the taskbar features integrated). You can’t do it. That taskbar is as much a part of OS X as the Blue Screen of Death was in Windows 95. Linux is a different story. You don’t want the taskbar but you like its features? No problem. Add whatever features to whatever taskbar or panel you want. Linux can pretty much take any configuration you throw at it. And if you still don’t like what you have, install a different desktop or window manager and you’re good to go.
    #2: Open source

    One of the biggest issues that Linux users have with OS X is the license. Apple took a BSD kernel to create its own Darwin kernel, released it under the Apple Public Source License (which was accepted by the Free Software Foundation), and then layered on top of that proprietary software to create OS X. At one point, Apple created OpenDarwin, which was a collaborative effort between Apple and the open source community. That project lasted four years before Apple took it down because it felt the effort to create an open source Darwin operating system had failed. In 2007, PureDarwin was created to continue the work that was developed with OpenDarwin. The PureDarwin project has come a long way and can even run Linux-based window managers (such as Enlightenment) on top of it. OS X, however, is still locked tightly together and can’t compete with the openness of Linux.
    #3: Command line

    Although most OS X users would balk at this (saying they have no use for the command line), most power users know the command line is crucial to serious administrative tasks. In this department, OS X falls way short of Linux. With Linux, you can do pretty much everything you need from the command line. With OS X? Good luck. Sure, OS X does have a fairly good set of command-line tools, but for the power admin, it’s just not enough. This is one area of OS X that I simply can’t figure out. Why didn’t Apple just migrate the Linux coreutils over to OS X? There are projects aimed at getting coreutils to compile on OS X, but it would have made more sense to have this by default. The coreutils package is a huge toolkit that contains nearly every basic command you need. OS X had to reinvent that wheel. But this goes beyond the coreutils package. What about installing via command line? What about command-line security? What about starting/stopping services from the command line?
    #4: Hardware requirements

    I have two Macs in my household. One Mac is an old iBook running at 800 Mhz with a 512 MB of RAM. That machine is slow with OS X running on it. But with Yellow Dog Linux, that little laptop runs much snappier. Same hardware, different OS. The other Mac is a G4 1.2 processor with 1 GB of RAM. I have an equivalent Intel machine running Ubuntu 8.10. The machines do not even compare in performance. The Ubuntu machine is faster on all levels (from boot to application launch). Taking a look at the minimum system requirements for OS X and Ubuntu, you see:

    OS X: 876 MHz or faster CPU, 512 MB of RAM, 9 GB of disk space
    Ubuntu: 700 MHz x86 processor , 384 MB ofRAM, and 8 GB of disk space

    So obviously Linux can run on lesser powered machines by default. And Ubuntu 8.10 is not the most optimized of the Linux distributions. Mandriva Spring 2008 has even fewer requirements (claiming to run on ANY CPU and only 256 MB of RAM).

    I have read of benchmarking tests claiming that OS X outperforms Ubuntu 8.10 soundly. But real world results would seem to contradict those claims. I ran a less-than-scientific test with the Mac iBook G4 1.2 and the Ubuntu 8.10 on a 1.2 processor. Both machines had 512 MB of RAM. On the Ubuntu machine (running the Enlightenment window manager), I was able to open up the following applications before the machine began to bog down: Firefox, OpenOffice Writer, OpenOffice Calc, OpenOffice Impress, Scribus, The Gimp, Amarok, GnuCash, Thunderbird, Basket, Audacity, Gqview, and aterm. The OS X machine was a different story. With OpenOffice, Firefox, Thunderbird, and iTunes open, the machine started to crawl. There was a noticeable degradation in performance. That’s an OS running 14 applications vs an OS running four applications before the OS comes to a crawl. I don’t know about you, but I would prefer the ability to run 14 apps.
    #5: Security

    In the most recent “Pwn 2 Own” competition, both the OS X and the Windows Vista machines were hacked, whereas the Linux machine was not. Of course there are pundits across the globe who will argue this one from all three sides, and finding unbiased results is akin to finding a definitive answer to the age-old TCO argument. But I can say, unequivocally, after 10-plus years of experience with Linux, that I have never had a machine or server compromised in any way. This, of course, is not to say that OS X is unsecure. But Linux simply is better equipped in the area of security. How? Tools. With tools like iptables, fwbuilder, and SELinux, Linux can lock down in many ways, on many levels. So you take a similar kernel but you add to that kernel-level tools to heighten security, and you can quickly see how Linux overpowers OS X in the area of security.
    6. Portability

    Another area where Linux shines over all other operating systems is in its ability to migrate an installation from hardware to hardware. Linux has an uncanny ability to be able to relocate. I have taken complete hard drives and moved them from one machine to another. So long as the architecture was the same (in other words, not moving from a x86 to an x86_64 machine), the migration always seemed to work with little to no adjusting. OS X, on the other hand, is landlocked to the machine it was installed in. Also, with Linux, you can take certain directories and move them from machine to machine. This works well with the /home directory. Having the ability to migrate your /home directory from one machine to another can make building machines a snap. With OS X, you’ll always be reinstalling from scratch.
    #7: Cost

    This is a big one for many people. First, you have the cost of the operating system alone. Linux is free. Period. OS X is currently selling for $129.00. Next is hardware cost. The cheapest Macbook you can purchase is $999.00. You can purchase a $399.00 laptop that will run Linux like a champ from any given dealer. Add on top of that the cost of the software you will need, and you can run up a fairly large tab. Linux? Nada. You can have an office-ready Linux machine that will tackle most every task you put to it for the cost of the hardware alone. Mac? Not so much. So if you’re looking to cut costs (and who isn’t, in this economy?), Linux is the way to go.
    #8: More available software

    This may come as a surprise to you, but Linux has far more software available than OS X. In a completely unscientific test, I did a search for both Linux and OS X on freshmeat.net (an index of UNIX and cross-platform software). Here are the numbers: Linux 11,781 results. OS X 1,477 results. Of course, many would say that it’s not a fair search because freshmeat.net is decidedly an open source leaning repository. With that in mind, lets turn to Google and search for OS X Software and Linux Software. The results: OS X 19,100,000 hits. Linux 45,700,000 hits.

    One of the things that separates Linux from all other operating systems is that for every task in Linux, there are numerous tools available to undertake it. Let’s look at the task of word processing. For Mac, you have Microsoft Office and OpenOffice as the major players, and then you have minor players, like Bean, Nisus, Mellel, and NeoOffice. With Linux, you have the major player OpenOffice, and then you have the minor players Textmaker, Abiword, Hangul, EZ, Kwrite, gedit, nano, vi, emacs, Flwriter, Ted, Siag Office, LaTeX, EditPad Pro, etc. You get the picture. And yes, you can install Linux apps on OS X with Fink. I’ve done this. It’s not a good solution because the software often is prone to crashing or not running at all.
    #9: Not so dumbed-down

    I have tried to come up with the phrase that is the opposite of “dumbed down,” but I’ve had no luck. So work with me on this one. One thing that Apple did very well with OS X is dumb down the operating system interface to the point where most all tasks are easy for anyone to do. But there are those who do not want that dumbed-down experience. With Linux, you can have a desktop experience on every level. You can have the full-on, dumbed-down experience akin to OS X with either GNOME or KDE. Or you can go to the complete opposite and use the console as your desktop. Or you can experience anything and everything in between the two. With OS X, many power users feel like someone is holding their hand throughout the experience. With Linux, you can let go of that hand from time to time or even chop the hand off and replace it with a hook. When you’re using the Apple desktop, OS X is in control. When you use the Linux desktop, you are in control.
    #10: Keyboard efficiency

    One of my biggest pet peeves with OS X is the fact that there is no normally functioning Delete key. Instead you have to hit fn + Delete to get the delete key to work as it should. This is pretty common practice with the OS X keyboard, which is about as efficient to a hard-core programmer as a salad is tasty. And it’s not just the Delete key. The End key doesn’t do what you would expect, either. To get to the end of the line, you have to add the fn key to the End key (so fn + End will get you to the end of the line.) Another issue — mouse buttons. I know this is a fundamental design that makes sense to Apple. But the majority of people like two mouse buttons. And with Linux, you actually get THREE mouse buttons. With those three mouse buttons, you can even do a simple copy and paste function (highlight text with a left mouse button and then click the middle mouse button to paste). The Linux keyboard is just far more efficient than the OS X keyboard.
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  12. will_123

    will_123 Small childs brain in a big body

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    This is in no way true. OSX is built on BSD. Its Unix. And it has all the tools you need. Just doesn't have a package system like your other distro's there. Why cant you do everything you want from the command line in OSX? I certainly can. Why would apple migrate Linux tools over to a Unix machine? That makes no sense. If you want Linux tools on your OSX machine then MacPorts is there and waiting with a huge repo of great tools ported over.

    OSX has ipfw which may be not be as good as iptables but its effective and does the job.
     
  13. murraynt

    murraynt Well-Known Member

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    Has anybody been using Elementary Luna?
     
  14. theshadow2001

    theshadow2001 [DELETE] means [DELETE]

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    Yes briefly on a vm. I like it. Quick nice light interface. Problem is I found it a bit buggy. Whether thats a vm thing or an elementary thing or a combination of both I don't know. But great potential there. If it becomes more stable it would be a great ubuntu replacement.
     
  15. will_123

    will_123 Small childs brain in a big body

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    Anybody doing anything interesting on their Linux boxes recently? I started out with openbox window manager to give me a shot of something other than KDE. Really quite enjoying it tbh. Very lightweight and quick, not resource hungry at all. And best of all very customizable with shortcuts and likes.
     
  16. CraigWatson

    CraigWatson Level Chuck Norris

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    Currently fine-tuning my Puppet configuration to spin up a new VPS running on WeLoveServers' new OpenVZ DC in London - a few facts I had written didn't play well with OpenVZ, and my modules have dependency issues (hello custom apt repositories and PPAs!). Trying to get Puppet to run as a one-command bootstrap is giving me serious headaches!
     
  17. GuilleAcoustic

    GuilleAcoustic Ook ? Ook !

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    I'm testing openBox and Archlinux on an USB stick with persistency actually. Really enjoying it too. Now I have to make an hard Decision: quad core ARM or Atom Bay-Trail ?
     
  18. deathtaker27

    deathtaker27 #noob

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    currently looking into own cloud and Chef (well Chef is on my once i have servers free again)
     
    Last edited: 7 Mar 2014
  19. murraynt

    murraynt Well-Known Member

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    Not full fledge OS, but i'm using OpenVPN on my raspberry pi.
     
  20. Booga

    Booga Cuppa tea anyone?

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    I have just resurrected a couple of old PC's using Xubuntu and Ubuntu. I like it.
    One of them was for an old peoples home and they aren't having any problems using it. So I think the myth that Linux based OS's aren't for the non-tech savvy is just that, a myth.
     

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