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Education What tools?

Discussion in 'General' started by longweight, 22 Mar 2013.

  1. longweight

    longweight Possibly Longbeard.

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    Hi all,

    I spend a lot of my time visiting sites that require some electrical work / fault finding. I currently carry these items around with me at all times:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    They are both great bits of kit but as I am starting to do more site visits and more wiring work I feel that I need a couple more bits to speed up my work, ideally these tools will be as light and small as possible!

    I would really like another small multitool that has some proper wire cutters / strippers such as this:

    [​IMG]

    Does anyone own this leatherman? Is it good?

    I would also like a very lightweight and small multimeter to give me AC/DC readings and continuity testing.

    I'm not really sure who else I should be looking at for this so any help would be great!
     
  2. bdigital

    bdigital Is re-building his PC again

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    Personally i prefer dedictaed tools rather than multi tools. What is it that you want to speed up or improve on? If it wire strripping then maybe a dedicated wire stripper?

    Oh and a tool box lol because you might end up carrying more around :)
     
  3. longweight

    longweight Possibly Longbeard.

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    Well I carry it all around in a backpack so I'm trying to combine things to save space, I rarely use them all day long so multi-tools seem to be the best option. I have also failed to find any nice, lightweight and compact wire strippers...

    I want to speed up my time for stripping and cutting cable. At the moment I use the knife on my leatherman to strip the outer sheath, then strip a couple of cores, put the knife away and open the wire cutters (which are getting very blunt and rubbish) cut the remaining core, back to knife to strip etc....
     
  4. Krikkit

    Krikkit All glory to the hypnotoad! Super Moderator

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    Just get a pair of strippers, they won't take up much room and using the appropriate tool is better imo. (I'm waiting for Uni to come and drop an epic multi-tool bomb on us now)

    I have a pair of these for general use, throw an elastic band around the handles and they'll take up sod-all room. They do take a bit of finesse if you don't adjust them to the wire size though.
     
  5. monteur

    monteur New Member

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    +1 for dedictaed tools from me too!
     
  6. longweight

    longweight Possibly Longbeard.

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    This looks pretty decent!
     
  7. BA_13

    BA_13 Active Member

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    With regard to the multimeter, Fluke make some very good portable meters that would cover all your needs and considering how durable they are do tend to be quite good value for money (my fluke is over 10 years old and still going strong after years of abuse in the marine environment).

    If you want something cheaper than a fluke I would suggest ensuring it has plug in leads and that you swap out the supplied ones with a decent branded set , again I'd suggest any of the fluke ones (generally (aside from stupid mistakes) if you get a shock while using a meter it's from a failed lead or fingers slipping off the insulated section of the probe onto the live tip and most decent sets have good finger guards).

    In respect of the tools you'd look more professional using the specific tool for the job rather than a multi-tool and should get better results too (Saying this my most used tool is a Bacho adjustable spanner :) )
     
  8. longweight

    longweight Possibly Longbeard.

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    That is true about looking professional...
     
  9. Margo Baggins

    Margo Baggins I'm good at Soldering Super Moderator

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    In my work tool kit (always in my work bag)

    - Knipex wire snips
    - Knipex long nose pliers
    - Wire stripper (adjustable, sprung type that you can spin on your finger)
    - RJ-45 crimp, RJ-11 crimp
    - Wera ratchet screwdriver - assorted ends (about 30)
    - Victronix Swisschamp
    - tiny screwdriver set (like the one you have pictured)
    - bag of cage bolts
    - bag of rj-45 plugs
    - bag of rj-11 plugs

    I got a little tool bag to put them all in and then they live in my laptop bag, but I couldn't find an actual proper tool bag the size I wanted (which bewildered me a bit) - but I ended up getting an airsoft pouch off amazon, which is the perfect size and made of hard wearing material.

    I have this wirestripper:

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Mechh69

    Mechh69 I think we can make that fit

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    Ill give a +1 on the Fluke multi meter they are hands down the best I have ever used, (and being a mechanic for 12+ years I have used a lot). As for tools I will say if you want the best you can order some from Snap On or Mac. I have both and have used them for years they hold up very well to almost any type of abuse, and they have a life time warrenty, but they may not have every tool your looking for.

    Multi tools are ok in a pinch but it is best to use the right tool for the right job and not try to make due with as little as possible.
     
  11. BA_13

    BA_13 Active Member

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    One other point I should have mentioned is that if you are using a multi-tool and have a minor accident that gets reported it is much more likely to cause serious issues than if you were using a dedicated tool.

    Certainly in the company I work for if a sub contractor had an accident using a multi-tool they personally would be unlikely to come back, and there would be questions asked of their employer (even a very minor cut to a finger that you would simply wash and put a band aid on at home can cause massive repercussions).
     
  12. longweight

    longweight Possibly Longbeard.

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    Good point!

    Now to find some seriously lightweight and compact tools!
     
  13. Da_Rude_Baboon

    Da_Rude_Baboon What the?

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    BA-13 do you work in the oil industry by chance?
     
  14. BA_13

    BA_13 Active Member

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    I do indeed :)

    I also realise that most industries / companies don't have quite such draconian safety policies as this industry, but I'm fairly certain most are heading this way to both reduce their potential liability in the event of an accident and ensure that none of their employees come to any harm. I'll leave it up to you to decide which reason takes precedence in the company mindset.
     
  15. Unicorn

    Unicorn Uniform November India

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    +1 to proper tools. I am a firm believer in having the right tool for the job, and also in having high quality tools that last. No £1 store or local hardware store crap in my toolbox. If I get a chance tomorrow, I might post a list of some of the tools I carry, but quickly off the top of my head, I carry tools from the following manufacturers every day:

    Draper
    Duratool
    Sealey
    DeWalt
    Knipex
    Wiha
    Fluke
    Snap-On
    Britool
    Bosch

    I am in the process of putting together a full set of compact tools that take up as little space as possible for my custom foamed Pelican 0450 site box. I need to have all of the tools before I get the case and design the CNC foam cutouts for it.
     
  16. lysaer

    lysaer Suck my unit! Kirk lazarus (2008)

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  17. KayinBlack

    KayinBlack Currently Rebuilding

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    I support Paladin and Fluke with my money, and both are still getting a workout even though I've retired from active cablemaking. If you had shown up to my worksite with a multitool to do anything around one of my machines and it wasn't a complete impromptu **** hit the fan moment you would turn around and go home, and my colleagues would hear of it too. Proper tools save lives and money both in the long run.

    I prefer a Fluke 175 for most of my PC-related work. If you do lots of actual wiring, Molex tools aren't cheap but do very well.
     
  18. longweight

    longweight Possibly Longbeard.

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    I've been looking at tool prom for most of the day, I will post my selection tomorrow.

    I agree, proper tools are much better and that is what I will be buying next week.
     
  19. c.cam108

    c.cam108 Member

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    If your electrical work involves cutting a lot of 1.5 or 2.5mm^2 cable then get one of these: [​IMG]

    They're not cheap, but they're worth their weight in gold for the time saved.

    Pair them with combination pliers, snipe nose pliers and some good VDE screwdrivers and you're good to go (can you tell I like C.K.?)

    I spent about £110 on that lot (cutters, 2x pliers and 7 screwdrivers) a few years ago and I reckon they'll last me for life.
     
  20. longweight

    longweight Possibly Longbeard.

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    I've been looking at a Wiha pair of pliers / cutters just like that!
     

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