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Who will you vote for at the next election?

Discussion in 'Serious' started by Solidus, 24 Mar 2022.

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Who will you vote for at the next election?

  1. Conservative

  2. Labour

  3. Liberal Democrats

  4. Other

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  1. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Lover of bit-tech Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    Dude, I'm not going through your "Corbyn as The Actual Antichrist" fan-fic line-by-line, 'cos it's all supposition. That, however, I had hard data on and wanted to share. Not everyone's trying to attack you at all moments, y'know.

    For all you know Corbyn would have offered *more* support to businesses by *not* funneling tens of billions of pounds of our cash to cronies...
     
  2. Nexxo

    Nexxo * Prefab Sprout – The King of Rock 'n' Roll

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    I pretty much disagree on all these points.

    Corbin would support businesses --especially small ones-- specifically because he is pro-worker. Like you said: if you're bankrupt, your staff lose their jobs too. In fact in his 25th March 2020 COVID debate statement, he made a big point of how keyworkers --and he explicitly mentioned not just health and social care workers, but "refuse workers, the supermarket shelf-stackers, the delivery drivers, the cleaners. They are often dismissed as low-skilled. But I ask, who are we least able to do without in a crisis – the refuse collector or the billionaire hedge fund manager?"

    Also: "Right now, Mr Speaker, the government can give peace of mind to all self-employed and insecure workers with an equivalent income protection scheme to that devised for employees.

    The freelancers, workers on zero-hours contracts, and those with no recourse to public funds still have no support.

    From cabbies to childminders, actors to plumbers, people are being told to do something extraordinary, to stop earning a living. Having made that demand, the government has an awesome responsibility to ensure they don’t immediately fall into hardship and are able to do what’s necessary for public health."


    UBI may increase employment and productivity. People can stop worrying so much about managing the cost of living and focus on their work.

    The UK Vaccine Manufacturing and Innovation Centre, is a joint venture between the University of Oxford, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Imperial College London, and industry partners. I strongly suspect Labour would nurture it --but the Conservatives are selling it off. And Labour would turn to Pfizer before Sputnik --after all the Conservatives did, too. I also suspect there wouldn't be the blatant cronyist grifting we've seen in PPE procurement and Track & Trace.

    I suspect Corbyn would have pursued a much less hard Brexit than the libertarian Tory ideologues. Since he aligns a lot on workers rights, this would be a given. Indeed, Labour's 2017 election manifesto committed to a “jobs-first Brexit” in which Britain would keep the benefits of single market and customs union membership. And at least he had an industrial policy, whereas currently we have a theatrical government of grand, empty gestures and deflecting culture wars.

    Ukraine: the UK consistently has refused giving military hardware to Ukraine until February. It is also little known that since 2014 the US has been giving them a lot of weapons (often with the European Defence Initiative), and the EU has been giving more financial support than the UK and US combined. Corbyn also has a recorded history of being strongly critical of Putin (and Russian oligarch money!) when other world leaders were still trying to schmooze him into line and London was laundering Russian money by the £billions.

    Conservatives have always spun the myth that it is the more fiscally responsible, pragmatic business-oriented government, and Labour spendthrift head-in-the clouds hippie/Commie ideologues. Not only is that factually untrue; the last few years should have disabused even the most trusting voter of the notion that Conservatives handle money sensibly and have sensible answers to complex economical problems.
     
    Last edited: 7 May 2022
  3. RedFlames

    RedFlames ...is not a Belgian football team

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    Sunak had to be dragged kicking and/or screaming into the furlough scheme, tried to end it too early and only relented when it became apparent horrific job losses would ensue.
    Support for self employed came even later, was an utter nutache to claim and most self-employed found they were entitled to nothing more than being flipped off by the govt.

    I got precisely £0 in support from HMG over the course of the pandemic. So if a Corbyn-led govt would've been worse than that I'm struggling to see how.

    If people would rather take the £500/month [based on the trials in Finland] UBI than £1500 [assuming minumum wage] from working for you, maybe... just maybe... you're the problem.
    People don't want to work = people don't want to work for you
     
    spolsh likes this.
  4. loftie

    loftie Modder

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    As someone who hasn't worked for a while, I wish I was in the position that I felt I could. UBI wouldn't solve my issues that I have, but it would make me feel less like a burden, which in turn would ease my anxiety and depression.
    The general idea that people who get paid won't want to work is nuts.
     
    adidan and RedFlames like this.
  5. adidan

    adidan Guesswork is still work

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    Seems we're going down the path laid out by Putin
     
  6. RedFlames

    RedFlames ...is not a Belgian football team

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    This is basically the bits of the Policing Bill that they couldn't get through the Lords.
     
  7. adidan

    adidan Guesswork is still work

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    True.

    I see a Tory MP is now saying there's no need for foodbanks it's just people don't know how to cook. Another said people should by home brand food.

    Not. A. Clue.

    Or more likely don't give a frak.
     
  8. RedFlames

    RedFlames ...is not a Belgian football team

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    Both.

    It's not that that don't know or they don't care...

    They don't know and they don't care.
     
  9. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Lover of bit-tech Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    You mean The Right Honourable Lee Anderson, Member of Parliament for Ashfield? Who earns £84,144 in salary for being an MP? Who was also a Councillor for Mansfield District Council until March last year, picking up an additional £6,385.92 a year on top of that?

    Who, in September that same year, received a "donation" of £7,500 from Cayzer Trust Company? And in the year prior picked up £3,000 from Stalbury Trustees, £3,000 from JC Bamford Extractors Ltd, £4,250 from The Tandridge Club, £5,000 from Mark J Bamford directly? Plus another £22,500 from Cayzer Trust and £2,000 direct from Elizabeth Cayzer, £2,000 from IPGL Ltd, and £2,000 from Enable Trading Ltd in 2019?

    And who on top of all that also claimed, between the 1st of June 2020 and the 31st of May 2021, £46,151.24 in Parliamentary expenses - not including direct staffing costs, which totalled £204,928.09? That Right Honourable Lee Anderson, Member of Parliament for Ashfield?

    Hmm.
     
    Nexxo and LennyRhys like this.
  10. sandys

    sandys Multimodder

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    Sounds like a good crack as an MP, parties and beer at work plus receiving sizable donations/bonuses etc, for being a prick, how did I not discover this career path, I would excel at it :D
     
    Gareth Halfacree likes this.
  11. mrlongbeard

    mrlongbeard Multimodder

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    The former Labour Brexiteer MP.
    There's not a wall long enough in the country to line them all up against.
     
  12. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Lover of bit-tech Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    Yup. Flying under a flag of convenience. Great choice, there, voting public!
     
    Mr_Mistoffelees likes this.
  13. mrlongbeard

    mrlongbeard Multimodder

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    So if the 'reported' tax cuts come about do we expect a snap general election to follow shortly thereafter?
     
    Mr_Mistoffelees likes this.
  14. Mr_Mistoffelees

    Mr_Mistoffelees The Bit-Tech Cat.

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    Hadrian’s Wall is quite long and, you can use both sides!

    I would be happy to assist.
     
  15. David

    David μoʍ ɼouმ qᴉq λon ƨbԍuq ϝʁλᴉuმ ϝo ʁԍɑq ϝμᴉƨ

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    He clearly hasn't learnt how to cook (the books).
     
  16. adidan

    adidan Guesswork is still work

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    Imbecile in charge: “My experience of working from home is you spend an awful lot of time making another cup of coffee and then, you know, getting up, walking very slowly to the fridge, hacking off a small piece of cheese, then walking very slowly back to your laptop and then forgetting what it was you’re doing.”

    Yes Boris, I imagine that is typical for you. For people who actually work and who have a sense of duty it's not typical
     
  17. mrlongbeard

    mrlongbeard Multimodder

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    He hasn't a clue, no mention of Literoctica or Chaturabte
     
  18. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Lover of bit-tech Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    Smacks of that idiot who said that rising sea levels wouldn't be a problem 'cos anyone whose home was about to be literally underwater would just sell up and move. Y'know, the one with the famous response "sell to who, 'kin' Aquaman?!"

    If the "solution" to the cost-of-living crisis is to "get a better job," and assuming that I *can* get a better job (big assumption, there, 'cos you'd assume that if I could get a better job I already would have 'cos why would I voluntarily stay at a worse one otherwise?) then... who's going to do the job I just left?

    If "get a better job" is the answer, then you're literally saying that lower-paid jobs don't need doing. Which... well, have fun when there are no waiters in the restaurant, no shelf-stackers or checkout staff at at the supermarket, no delivery drivers for your online orders, everywhere's filthy 'cos nobody's cleaning, and let's not look too closely at how much nurses and other hospital staff get paid 'cos then we'll really be up poo mountain without a flyswat...

    Well, I guess there is one other interpretation: the lower-paid jobs do need doing, but the people doing them deserve to live in poverty. Which strikes me as being neither humanitarian nor long-term sustainable in outlook, so maybe let's just be generous and assume stupidity instead.

    And let's not forget, this is from a Member of Parliament earning £84,144 a year. And who claimed £56,916.71 in Parliamentary expenses between the 1st of June 2020 and 31st of May 2021 on top of that. Not counting direct staffing costs, which brings the total expenses claimed to £220,488.21. And who is currently receiving £15,000 from Brigam Limited via the Redditch Conservative Association in 12 monthly instalments, ending February 2023 - on top of £10,000 received from same in 2019, alongside £2,000 from Lord Philip Harris, £4,000 from Jason D. Dalby, and £2,500 from David C. Cooke in 2019.

    And who, it's probably worth mentioning, shares in the benefit of functionally-subsidised meals and alcohol at the Houses of Parliament - costing the taxpayer between £3 million and £9 million a year.

    If you're not angry yet, you're not paying attention.
     
    Last edited: 16 May 2022 at 10:55
  19. adidan

    adidan Guesswork is still work

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    Apparently we should also only be spending 30p on ingredients and fuel for a full meal.

    Still awaiting that recipe.
     
  20. Mr_Mistoffelees

    Mr_Mistoffelees The Bit-Tech Cat.

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    We could all use Arnold J Rimmer’s efficient way with toilet paper. Just 3 sheets, “one up, one down and one to polish.”
     

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