1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Blogs Why Software Companies Should Slash Their Prices

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by Cutter McJ1b, 4 Feb 2010.

  1. Cutter McJ1b

    Cutter McJ1b Home-cut jibs at discount Prices

    Joined:
    18 Feb 2009
    Posts:
    123
    Likes Received:
    1
  2. yuusou

    yuusou Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    5 Nov 2006
    Posts:
    1,948
    Likes Received:
    258
    Spot on! I pirated Portal and HL2:EP2 when it came out (ZOMG I'm so evul). I bought the Orange Box on the Christmas Sale (which kind of pisses me off because I already had HL2 and EP1 since release date but hey...).
     
  3. Hugo

    Hugo Ex-TrustedReviews Staff

    Joined:
    25 Dec 2006
    Posts:
    1,384
    Likes Received:
    19
    Correlation is not causation. The Steam sales show that it's easy to manipulate people's perceived value and increase sales by offering a discount from a pre-stated MSRP, not that selling at a lower price will increase sales.
     
  4. ChaosDefinesOrder

    ChaosDefinesOrder Vapourmodder

    Joined:
    6 Feb 2008
    Posts:
    706
    Likes Received:
    7
    I've been saying for ages that £25 for a PC game should be the maximum release price. Not £40, certainly not £50! This does make it infuriating when games are priced at £25.99 or even £29.99! This is the problem with direct-from-publisher sites such as EA's store, where games like Mirror's Edge were £40 3 months after release! Steam has the data that you have already mentioned in the article so they know that lower prices equal more sales so they're a definite exception!

    There's also the argue of "Cost" vs "Worth" - as in "how much does that cost?" compared to "how much is that worth". For example, a 32GB iPhone 3GS SIM free costs £800, but comparing features like for like with other current gen handsets, it's worth only £400 to £500.
     
  5. hardflipman

    hardflipman New Member

    Joined:
    27 Jul 2004
    Posts:
    140
    Likes Received:
    0
    I've bought a whole load of games recently on steam because they were cheap. i even bought company of heroes for a second time cos it was so cheap when i only wanted opposing forces.
    i still occasionally buy games at full price but very rarely.

    i'm sure there was an article on bit-tech about percieved value of games, was very interesting...
     
  6. Skiddywinks

    Skiddywinks Member

    Joined:
    10 Aug 2008
    Posts:
    929
    Likes Received:
    8

    I agree that you can't just associate correlation with causation, but I don't really see what that has to do with the topic. I mean, it is safe to assume that lowering the price increases the sales, since that is exactly what happens everytime there is a Steam sale (or even just weekend deals). Now, unless Valve time these sales with the tide or planetary organisation, I can't really see what makes the idea that low cost equals high sales so dangerous.

    I wouldn't have bought a single £20 game on Steam over Christmas, but I ended up spending about £30 instead. Sure, this doesn't all go to a single developer, but that is still £30 in the industry that normally wouldn't have been there. I bought at least one game every day of the Christmas deal (except the second to last and last). It's a joke. £3 for a game I don't even know much about is hardly a massive loss if it turns out bad.

    I wonder how well MW2 would have sold if it was going for a tenner? Or even £20? I would have a copy, that's for sure.
     
  7. Combatus

    Combatus Bit-tech Modding + hardware reviews Staff Super Moderator

    Joined:
    16 Feb 2009
    Posts:
    2,751
    Likes Received:
    64
    That's more my thinking, it's about people buying things when they wouldn't normally, you're essentially reaching a new audience by doing nothing but lowering the price. If MW2 was £20 instead of £40 I would have bought it too, as would many other people I know who aren't keen on the MP aspect of COD but liked the single player mode in MW and wanted to give MW2 a ago. Those Christmas deals were very unhealthy for the wallet!
     
  8. Hugo

    Hugo Ex-TrustedReviews Staff

    Joined:
    25 Dec 2006
    Posts:
    1,384
    Likes Received:
    19
    If we assume that the sharp increase in sales as a result of discounts is as a result of people thinking "that game is now at a price I am willing to pay," then it seems safe to assume that if it has launched at that price they would already own it. If games were priced lower from the off it would likey just mean those people waiting for the discounts now wouldn't need to.

    For example:

    Game A and Game B are equally desirable titles.

    Game A launches at £50 and after a month has sold 20 copies. Game B launches at £10 and after a month has sold 80 copies. Now Game A is discounted to £10 and over the next month sells a further 80 copies as a result. Meanwhile Game B sells 20 copies, still at £10 a copy.

    After two months both have sold 100 copies, but Game A has pulled in £1,800 and Game B only £1000. Which was the more successful strategy? Even if Game B offered the same 80% discount (i.e. sold for £2) and got the same sales increase (400%) it's second months sales (£640) would still put it behind Game A overall (by £160).

    In reality, the disparity would be greater, because Game A will have planted the idea in everyone's head that it's "worth" £50 in that first month, whereas Game B is "worth" only £10. A reduction from £50 to £10 is (obviously) bigger than from £10 to £2. More importantly, the Game A reduction will take it from "unaffordable" to "affordable" for a number of would-be buyers, whereas the Game B discount merely takes it from "affordable" to "cheap."

    Sales may provide (massive) spikes in sales, but they're just that; spikes. You've got to look at lifetime sales figures and profit before deciding whether setting a lower selling price from the off is going to pay off in the long run.
     
  9. Farfalho

    Farfalho New Member

    Joined:
    27 Nov 2009
    Posts:
    424
    Likes Received:
    2
    Very good article and very good example from HugoB. Although people prefer to see a blockbuster at low, sometimes we got it wrong from the profit view
     
  10. Krazeh

    Krazeh Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    12 Aug 2003
    Posts:
    2,111
    Likes Received:
    56
    While I appreciate what you're saying your example only holds up when you put a massive disparity in price between the 2 titles. If you take the same example but have Game A at £50 for a month then £10 for a month, and Game B at £25 for a month then £10 for a month, then Game B ends up making more money. Even if Game B goes as low as £20 for the first month it'd make as much money as Game A given the sales figures in your example.
     
  11. Xir

    Xir Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    26 Apr 2006
    Posts:
    5,249
    Likes Received:
    88
    In fact, i bought my first Steam titles because of the sale.
    And more than I planned.
    And one "just-to-try-it". (Mirrors Edge)

    Even though company strategists don't like it, pricing does influence the attractivity.
    Who'd buy a Dacia if it weren't for the price?

    And Win7 will be the first OS i've bought since stopping buying pre-builds.
    Shame you need professional just for the network settings though ;)
     
  12. NethLyn

    NethLyn Member

    Joined:
    24 Apr 2009
    Posts:
    971
    Likes Received:
    17
    Good article but moot if the pre-order system keeps some PC game prices below £20, AvP cost me £16 and that was boxed - so I laughed at the current price that comes up after you play the demo of £25. It is perceived value though, paid up straight away for the two L4D games pre-launch.

    On the other hand, I just tried to find Total Immersion Racing - , the £3 I paid was nice, down from Xplosiv's £4.99 but nobody's getting a cut in the industry as I bought through eBay- that's their fault for deleting it. That's totally different from the £3 I paid for the first AvP through Steam where they are getting a few pence and providing continuing dev support on an 11 year old game - win-win all round in the case of the latter.
     
  13. LucusLoC

    LucusLoC New Member

    Joined:
    28 Nov 2006
    Posts:
    91
    Likes Received:
    3
    it seems to me that a lot of "AAA" titles price higher, and keep it there, to maintain a more hardcore user base. i know that is not the real reason, but i feels that way. i would have bought MW2 myself (instead of just playing a friends copy) if it has been even as high as $20. however it just was not worth it at any price higher than that. I was never planning on being anything other than a casual player and $50 was just too much for the entertainment value. for a hc CoD fan $50 is well worth it though, so the player base is much more rich in hc vs. casual players because of the price disparity.

    another example: if wow was $2 a month i would still be a subscriber, but it is too expensive @ $10 a month. this keeps a lot of the casual gamers off the servers, as only the hc player are willing to pay that much month to month.


    @hugoB

    good example, but the "profit maximization" equation has to be considered across the whole company, not just per game. its like a band that gives away a single to increase sales of the album. if you get a reputation for really good games priced cheaper than everyone else, you are going to wind up selling way more copies than everyone else over all, and you will have a better brand image. if you can reinvest that money into making more games then you can make more money producing 10 "high value" games instead of just 2 "game of the year" games that sell for 5 times as much per copy. (of course this also falls back on my feeling that the games and entertainment industry relies to much on pretty pictures and not enough on content. . . make better games and movies, not prettier ones)
     
  14. Aragon Speed

    Aragon Speed Busily modding X3: Terran Conflict

    Joined:
    12 Jan 2009
    Posts:
    168
    Likes Received:
    1
    To keep this in perspective you also have to look at it from the other side. The cost of producing a game today is much higher than it has ever been before, and a company must be able to regain the money they have spent producing said game.

    Though I also believe that 40-50 pounds is far too much to pay. I haven't bought any games for a long time simply because I cannot afford to do so. The one exception to the rule is Dragon Age: Origins. This is a game that I wished to play, but could not due to it's price. Then I found it on Amazon for £16 and snapped it up.

    I think that £30 for a game at release is a fair price to re-coup expenses while not pricing it out of the range of most people. Then dropping the price to £20 after 4 months so that the few of us that cannot afford the £30 still have the chance to experience and enjoy the game.
     
  15. l3v1ck

    l3v1ck Fueling the world, one oil well at a time.

    Joined:
    23 Apr 2009
    Posts:
    12,945
    Likes Received:
    17
    Q) Why am I still using Office 97?
    A) Because it's way too expensive to get a new version (unless you're a student) and it still works just as well.
     
  16. dec

    dec [blank space]

    Joined:
    10 Jan 2009
    Posts:
    320
    Likes Received:
    8
    C) its good to be a student
     
  17. DarkBanana

    DarkBanana New Member

    Joined:
    6 May 2009
    Posts:
    176
    Likes Received:
    3
    There must be a 'sweet-spot'. As price goes down, the number of sales increases. That must be true. The key question is exactly how they are related. If you plotted a hypothetical graph of costs versus numbers sold, you'll probably end up with some sort of reverse sigmoid (there must be a correct name) which would basically look like a backwards 'S'

    If you then plotted costs versus profit, you'd end up with a skewed bell shaped curve@ too low a price and you don't make enough money per copy, too high a price and you don't sell enough. and the highest point would be the cost 'sweet spot'

    Don't really know where I'm going with this but I've always assumed that there are whole departments in companies that just sit down and try to estimate this graph...

    Another interesting point you didn't quite mention but that proxess hinted at: piracy. I think what a lot of people don't realise is that areas where piracy is endemic like. Asia or Russia, the people are just too poor to afford games at full retail price. I come for Malaysia where a £40 games can be 10% of someone's monthly salary (probably a lower middle class income). In terms of McDonalds, it would cost 30 value meals or 230 ice cream sundeas . If games were £10, it would literally open up new markets of 'pirate gamers' in these areas.
     
  18. AshT

    AshT Custom User Title

    Joined:
    9 Jul 2009
    Posts:
    996
    Likes Received:
    31
    There are two reasons why Steam sales work so well.

    Firstly, we all have a price we will pay for anything.

    Secondly, the convenience.

    If a new game releases @ £30 on PC it will sell, but likely to very few people.

    @ £25 the sales increase.

    @ £20 the price enters the appealing price range.

    @ £15 the price is very appealing

    @ £10 we're hitting bargain prices

    @ £5 the price is almost too good to say no

    @ £2 you will find it hard to say no even to games you may not like. At this price it's such a bargain that even the plain curious say yes.

    I can't count how many times I've walked into Game, looked at the chart section and found nothing worth buying, then very briefly scanned over the budget section not even movng any games cases forward to see what lurks behind the front rows and walked out game-less. I also fnd the whole look and feel of the bargain sections (and certainly the second hand section) as extremely tacky and trampy. But with Steam I just feel like a bargain hunter and very pleased when I discover a bargain. With Steam you don't get the Mastertronic or Platinum labels as well, maybe that helps with the psychology.

    At £2-a-game I don't give a monkeys if the game isn't perfect, I don't care if it doesn't hold my attention for longer than 1 hour, I appreciate that even @ £2 the creators get something back for their work - and this is especially true for indie titles. in fact acouple of quid to experience a game you wouldn't normally think of playing is a total bargain.

    The best bargains to be had are usually publisher packs. These can contain a range of games from old to new, cheap to expensive but usually you will get a couple of gems that are worth the pack price alone and then all the extra games are added bonuses that sit in your games list for a rainy day.

    ... this post was created on my iPhone in bed ... I can't wait for my friggin iPad (or other tablet) because long posts are a chore!!
     
  19. PureSilver

    PureSilver E-tailer Tailor

    Joined:
    16 Dec 2008
    Posts:
    3,152
    Likes Received:
    235
    +2 on that; I've little interest in being 24/7 cannon fodder for hardcore online players, so the SP is the bit I'm interested in and I'm sorry but I'm not paying £39.99 for 5 hours of gameplay. On a related note, how come neither MW nor MW2 ever enter the Steam sales?

    D) Much like 7, for something you use as much as Office it's really not that expensive either. Surely £70 every decade isn't that damaging?
     
  20. NethLyn

    NethLyn Member

    Joined:
    24 Apr 2009
    Posts:
    971
    Likes Received:
    17
    97? You've beaten me, my last new version was 2000, but then took the Home and Student deal on Office 2007 (and let's face is MS doesn't care how you divvy up the licences, £20 each in a student house if you wanted a legit original, and you fight over the CD at the end of your course) just because the version before is the one businesses tend to upgrade to, and I want to know the differences.

    To be honest Office help is now online in lieu of a manual so you don't even need to buy a book anymore, but it's just good to have your own original, and in a multi-user pack as well if you have more than one machine. It's perceived value that you just can't get away from. OpenOffice on my CV means nothing as well as costing nothing. £60 is a small price to pay to keep your software skills up.

    Whether AvP '10 is good or bad, it's the second cheapest brand new game I will have bought in at least three years, at £16, if it's not as good as the £3 Steamed-up original then I won't feel short-changed.
     
Tags: Add Tags

Share This Page