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Winbond BH5 ram, why isn't it being made anymore?

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Kryai, 8 Jun 2004.

  1. Kryai

    Kryai What's a Dremel?

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    I started getting into the hardware scene about 5 months ago while i know that BH5 ram is the best currently, and that is is not being produced anymore i am unsure to the reasons that is is not being produced further. If this is the best ram for its great timings etc why would anyone decide to stop making it and selling it! I clearly show my ignorance of anything before i started up again as you can see but i am very curious to the nature of this issue. :D So what happened?!
     
  2. Tim S

    Tim S OG

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    Winbond pulled out of the DRAM market because they weren't making enough money from their DRAMs. Basically BH-5 was costing too much to produce, and winbond weren't making sufficient capital from it.

    That's to cut a long story short.
     
  3. sinizterguy

    sinizterguy Dark & Sinizter

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    :thumb:

    Couldnt they have sold the technology (?) involved to one of the other companies ?
     
  4. Kryai

    Kryai What's a Dremel?

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    I'd imagine there was a premium for the ram once there was information out and about at its performace. I mean if you have the absolutely best ram available it's a shame that you can't keep it alive. I'll make sure to send them a copy of my Econ 101 book and inform them they should have raised thier prices!
     
  5. Gecko

    Gecko What's a Dremel?

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    Was this the hooge earthquake in the far east thing?
     
  6. 8-BALL

    8-BALL Theory would dictate.....

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    You have to remember that the enthusiast market is simply not big enough to fully support a product like that. You would need to shift it in HUGE quantities to make any money, and to the majority of computer users, any memory is the same as any other memory.

    8-ball
     
  7. Gecko

    Gecko What's a Dremel?

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    Yes, but there was a huge earthquake or something in which a lot of the RAm stockpiles were distroyed, or was that to long ago to affect BH-5?
     
  8. Kryai

    Kryai What's a Dremel?

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    Well, the most important albeit incredibally idealistic, they should have pursued the path to test the limits of how far they could go! That is the spirit of overclocking i think, to make the best system you can to further the strive to betterment of things. It's sad that our world makes sure this type of behavior is stamped out so easily :wallbash:
     
  9. 8-BALL

    8-BALL Theory would dictate.....

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    Firstly, they are memory makers, and not overclockers. Make sure you realise which comes first.

    Why did they stop making BH-5.

    Here's my take.

    The market didn't need it. I KNOW, I KNOW, overclockers love it, but we ARE NOT the market, at least, we are not a big enough market. So they were faced with a memory which no-one really needed, so they couldn't price it up relative to how much it cost to make, which they could if enough people wanted it, so they didn't really make any profits.

    8-ball
     
  10. Kameleon

    Kameleon is watching you...

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    Exactly. CH-5 was cheaper to produce, which is why they switched to it in the first place, but it still didn't pull them out of the red so they stopped altogether.
     

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