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Scratch Build – Complete ⭐ WING X99 - A CNC-milled Scratch Build! (Benchmarks,temps and wallpapers posted)

Discussion in 'Project Logs' started by Andreas | Brodholm, 19 Aug 2016.

  1. HandMadeAndroid

    HandMadeAndroid That's handy.

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    Thanks for listening to my grumbles, page is loading great now. Lovely work, looking forward to seeing more :D
     
  2. B NEGATIVE

    B NEGATIVE All Hail Kim Jong Magoo!

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    I do it because its a ball ache tramming the board.....

    XD
     
  3. Hasle

    Hasle nohasslemods›

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    The CNC looks absolutely stunning mate! Loved what you did with Model 01, and can't wait to see what madness you'll be capable of now, with this new toy at your disposal. +sub! :)
     
  4. Andreas | Brodholm

    Andreas | Brodholm Member

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    No worries! Noticed how much faster it was now also. I was in my apartment that have 1000mbit fiber. But when I got to this place where I work from I have 24/1mbit. You get blind with that fast internet. It is only when you switch back you realize how fast/slow the other connection is. :wallbash:

    I find it quite relaxing. I don't have to worry about crashes and I can go around fixing other "****" that needs fixing :D

    Being able to fit a 16mm end-mill also helps with the speed significantly. Wish I had a spindle that could handle a big face-mill and ATC. I guess I just have to keep dreaming :lol:


    I'm designing this chassis on model 01! It have been my main computer since I built it! Learned a lot from that case. And what I don't like about it (like the filter management)

    Here are some more CNC updates! I'm editing some pictures of me cutting the plates for the chassis also! Will be up tomorrow or Monday. Programming the first cuts as I write this!

    [​IMG]
    This is what I am going to make my Z-axis tool setters from.

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    Started with making a 5mm hole through the whole part and a partially drilled 15mm hole. Then I cut it of.

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    22mm drill

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    First drilled with the 22mm then I used the insert to get the correct diameter of 23mm and a flat hole

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    Pushing in a 20mm ID teflon brushing

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    All nice and flat. Measured 20.08mm ID.

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    Making the tool itslef. Got it down to about 20.15mm. That leaves me with some room to carefully grind it down to the correct diameter

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    Grinded down to about 20.7mm and did a small cut that a stop screw will run along.

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    Time to cut of the axis to the correct length and flip it around.

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    Faced of and a 3mm chamfer.

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    Work in the lathe done, now its time to get to polishing and a few holes.

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    Made a small hole for a M4 stop screw.

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    The stop screw keeps the top of the tool from coming of.

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    All the parts for the Zero tool. Tool body, Tool top, spring, sensor (inside) and a stop screw

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    Need this to be very flat.

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    Much better. Did not bother with the small scratches on the bottom surface, its flat, and that is what matters.

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    Quite deep scratches here. About 0.05-0.10mm deep. This is a pain...

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    After A LOT of slow paced wet sanding I got it down to this finish. Went from 120 grit to 240, 400, 800 and finished with 1200. This took probably an hour to get. I was very careful to sand it down flat and on a flat surface granite sheet (that weighs sooo effin much!!!). I had to do this procedure twice since i needed 2 tools. One as Z-axis zero and one as a fixed reference.

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    Light mounted and connected! Its very bright and the phone turned down the aperture way down. So its much brighter than it appears. You can check the surrounding area and this is in the middle of the day with all the other lights on. Very pleased with the amount of light coming from this thing.

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    Fixed the aperture so you can grasp the difference

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    The reference tool shown here.

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    Comparison with no light on (notice the background and how bright that is)

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    And with the light on. As you can see the camera adjusted the aperture down to not over expose the shot. But compare the background to the previous picture and you can see the difference. It's not overly bright but still very bright.

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    Made a tool holder for the auto zero tool. Fits nicely and keeps it secure.

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    Yes, I need to clean the machine, and yes the switches have no labels! All in due time! :)

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    Getting the tooling from a big box of mixed tools is a pita and I spend at least a few minutes checking the lables and fiddling around trying to find the tool I need. So some holders for the mills was really needed. Started with some leftover planks and cut them in to 105mm long pieces.

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    Milling wood is a bit different, and without the dust shoe not yet connected with the new hose it makes a mess.

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    Another one for clamps and tooling. Notice the thin layer of dust that is EVERYWHERE!!! Need to cut that pipe ASAP.

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    All done!

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    Much better! Everything organized and easy to find and put back.

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    The "complete set" of tooling. Starting from the left, the green wood mills, soft metal/plastic mills, screws, and parallel plugs, and finally all the ER25 collets (These are the ones you put your end mills in for those not familiar).
     
  5. eucalyptus

    eucalyptus I am 19 and Swedish!

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    Dra mig baklänges, Andreas, I can tell you that. I had never heard of you before, but o m g, and I see you are from Sweden, your skills, perfection and talent, well obviously also the possibilities with the machines - you are the greatest modder in Sweden of all times!


    Never seen someone this good in Sweden, you are by far the greatest I ever seen. I am impressed and I wish you best of luck with the continues. Hope to see more soon :)


    Lycka till, du gör ett underbart bra jobb!
     
  6. GeneralFun

    GeneralFun Lurker with tools

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    CNC porn! Forgot this was a computer build! I want to play in your shop! Great work!!!
     
  7. shokka9

    shokka9 New Member

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    Damn bro. That machine is allsorts of awesome.

    Good work, no doubt the scratch PC build will be just as good. Your quality levels, and work ethics seems to be up there.

    Keep it up bro
     
  8. Andreas | Brodholm

    Andreas | Brodholm Member

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    Well, I might not agree on that :)

    But thanks for the very kind words :blush:

    Playtime at the workshop! :dremel:

    Thanks! I try and keep everything clean and not skimp out on stuff! I believe that yields the best results in the end. That is what works best for me!
     
  9. Andreas | Brodholm

    Andreas | Brodholm Member

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    [​IMG]
    Yes getting the ore from the ground might be considering from the ground up, but close enough :)

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    10mm casted (GS) PMMA/Acrylic plexiglass or whatever you want to call it!

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    Very big sheets, to big in fact. Next time I will be going for the much more convinent sizes of 1x2 meters. These are 2x3 meters...

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    Absolutely huge!

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    Time to cut these down!

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    As always, safety! Really important to protect your eyes. It is very easy to get dust/particles that is a pain in the ass to remove and worst case you get some framgent that can make you blind. ALWAYS use glasses when cutting material!

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    Lines and a aluminum guide plane! Can't go wrong then with that amount of safety. Really don't want to scrap these. They cost quite a bit...

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    Gap saw i believe its called in English.

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    The saw fits in the straight strip of extruded aluminium. And then follows that exact path for a very straight cut.

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    Went really smooth and the cuts was very nice!

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    Lots and lots of these chips that become electrically charged when you cut. And they want to stick to everything!!!

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    10mm and 6mm sheets are all cut. Left half of each 2x3 meter sheets uncut. This will be more than enough for a while.

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    Time to get down to the harder stuff. Aluminium, got this special blade that is supposed to be designed for this purpose.

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    10mm aluminium EN1050A H111. I ended up not using these since they got heavy scratches after bad storage next to steel sheets!!! I was not happy about this but there was nothing to do other than getting new ones. This time I went for EN5754 H111, which is much harder and better for machining.

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    They are very nice and clean (But as I said, these got deep scratches in them now, rendering them useless for decorative work).

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    A bit nervous here. It's a 10 mm thick sheet of aluminium that is being cut with a tool designed mainly for woodworking and carpenters.

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    To my surprise it cut it like butter. Very impressed with the blade and the quality of the tool.

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    These are the new EN5754 sheets, very disappointed with the delivery. They came wet and have probably been stored like that for a while. The got this oxidation that needs to be removed with either sanding or polishing. Not what you want from a new sheet that you paid good money for.

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    It is not deep or something that can't be fixed. Its just a hassle, not like those 1-0,5mm deep scratches I got in the other plates (although that was not the suppliers fault but the workers at the workshop I am at)

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    This also... This is like an IKEA sticker nightmare. There was this thin sheet of paper between the sheets that is now one with the aluminium. Will probably have to use some alcohole or something to get this of. Sooooo much unnecessary work for me...

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    Believe me I will be making a call to our supplier to see what they have to say about this. They usually deliver everything in tip top shape with excellent quality.

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    Ohh well, I will get started with these plates anyway and if I can get new ones I will switch to those sheets as I progress.

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    Anyway, now everything is cut and ready to go on the CNC router. All sorted in different slots for different materials!

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    Next update will be some cutting action and finally production of the case can begin. Took a lot of steps to get here but I am ready to begin now. And all these delays with the material have enabled me to get all the components that is going into the chassis so I can really check that everything will fit nicely. And I have also improved the CNC a lot. And that should really speed up the milling process of the case. So all in all, they delays have not been all bad. These updates are sometimes lagging behind a few days due to the nature of editing both video and photos as of now. This should speed up when I get better routines as the updates progresses!

    But my question to you is how you want these updates if you could chose. Will be a lot of milling and programming in CAM and also design setup etc. Would you like the whole process with video of me editing code, setting up sheets, doing preparations, video of the actual cutting (cut down into manageable segments etc). Myself I think that gifs for example is a very good substitute for video when there is only short segments that I need to visualize. What is your opinion? Let me know, I would really like to have everyone's thoughts on this :)
     
    Last edited: 28 Sep 2016
  10. GeneralFun

    GeneralFun Lurker with tools

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    My thoughts on your updates? They are YOUR updates. It is YOUR work log. If you take the time to photograph something, add words to it and post it, it will be consumed by the community! I'd not be too concerned with other peoples thoughts on how/what/when/you should post. I'd hope you participate here for your own enjoyment and not worry about the opinions of others! Your posts are great, your work exemplary and that CNC, wow, just freaking WOW!
     
  11. Andreas | Brodholm

    Andreas | Brodholm Member

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    Thanks for your input! :thumb:

    I know that it is my log and I do what I want with it. But I really like input, especially when I can learn from it. I am doing what I like to see in a log, bit I am ALWAYS looking for ways to improve. And If the community have useful feedback and interesting ideas on content I want it :D. My girlfriend thinks I am weird this way, that I usually want people to point out mistakes and things I can do better. Usually people do not want that, I am the other way around. As long as it is constructive and helpful!

    And thanks for the praise on the CNC, basically done now! I will post the renaming pictures as soon as they are done and edited! :lol:
     
  12. Andreas | Brodholm

    Andreas | Brodholm Member

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    Update #03

    Update! These are the first cuts on the project! I have not gotten around to edit the video footage yet. I think I am going to ninja edit some gif's in later and also post them in a separate post. Also working on a youtube video. Hopefully it will be up later this weekend If my very limited skills in adobe premiere prevail! :wallbash: :sigh: :waah: :D

    Tried to describe the whole process as good as I could. Took a looooong time. Probably not going to do this every time since it would become repetitive. But I thought it would be good for those wanting to get into CNC or learn a few things about the process! Hope you enjoy!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    A fresh start, with a fresh spill board!

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    I use these small 12 mm hardened shafts to align the work piece to make sure it is parallel.

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    As you can see here the aluminium sheets gets pushed toward 2 of these to achieve perfect alignment along the Y axis.

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    Very soft aluminium clamps. Too soft maybe, but they usually scratch instead of the material.

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    Bottom side of the clamps. Allows for a range of about 2-10 mm thickness to be clamped.

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    I used six of these to secure a 8 x 300 x 1000 mm 5754 aluminium sheet.

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
    Very flexible, I constantly have to bend these back when I get too rough with them. That's not good since they flex past the yield point and will eventually break. But I just have to make some new and improved versions then!

    [​IMG]
    This is the part I am machining today. The very bottom part of the case.

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    4 mm polished end mill for soft metals like aluminium, brass, copper etc. Also suitable for plastic.

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    These are ER25 collets that holds the milling tools in place.

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    Here is a pack of them. Goes from 1 mm to 16 mm. And to the right you can see the special tool that fits over the "clamp nut" (name?) that squeezes the collets and consequentially squeeze the tool.

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    Here it is, fastened in the spindle.

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    No rush, measure everything twice. And then again to be sure. Then doubt yourself and measure again

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    I am centering the program on the bottom left corner. I need to make sure I don't have a collision with the holding clamps and also don't go too far.

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    The chassis is 235 mm wide. This means I have about 20 mm of space left on each side for the tool path (takes about 12 mm on all passes on each side) and the clamps.

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    The contour cuts, and holes are made on the main/first side I mill. The lines you see here are tool path lines.

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    About to plunge down into the aluminium!

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    Contact!

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    Here you can see the chip evacuation. I am having a hard time showing you since the dust shoe is in the way. I even lifted it up to get some better shots, resulting in a mess! But it was worth it :)

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    Very nice surface finish. Really sharp edges with no rubbing or vibration marks.

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    Cleaned up the cut a bit with some compressed air.

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    First tool cut done, now on to bigger (and better?) tools!

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    Up from 4 mm to a 10 mm end mill! I do not have any tight inner corners this time, and a larger diameter tool produces a better cut than a smaller diameter tool. So I will use this 10 mm for the contour cut!

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    Auto Zero after each tool change. Goes out to the reference position and adjusts the ZERO-plane after the new and changed tool height.

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    I use these droplet canons on each side to apply coolant/lubrication fluids. Works really well. You don't have that mist all over the shop and it also evacuates chips.

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    Now using a bigger ER25 collet! And, you guessed it, the 10 mm collet for the 10 mm tool :) Rocket science!

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    The inner profile cut under way. This is the first roughing pass. I am taking about 2 mm per pass with a feed rate around 600 mm/min.

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    Tabs are starting to show! That means we are close to cutting through the stock.

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    Inner contour done. Now I just have to get that thing out of there...

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    These are the tabs I am talking about. They hold the part in place so it does not come loose during the cutting passes. The part coming loose will result in either the tool breaking, or damaging the part, or pushing it loose from its clamps. A pain in the ass, but better than the alternative.

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    I use a rotating tool that uses air as propellant. And I use these small and neat cutting disks. Much more robust than a Dremel disk, for example.

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    Cut done. But you can see that I am now left with these partially cut tabs sticking out. So that's no good at all.

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    This is solved with another pass. In programming I saved about 0.5mm for a finishing cut. Where I remove the last bit of material and at the same time improves the surface finish quality even more.

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    This will go in the bin with scrap parts that I might have use fore later. It's big enough that I don't want to just toss it.

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    Surface finish is really good. Now I just need to keep it this good until final sanding and glass bead blasting.

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    This is the second side of the part. Chamfers and some M4 holes were made here. You can see that my stock is defined as XYZ with the Z-axis starting on the top of the stock here instead of the bottom.

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    With the outer contour coming next, I need to secure the piece to the table since the outer clamps will do nothing when the piece is nearly free from the stock. If you don't have clamps securing the piece from "inside" like this, you must either use tabs or you'll get a V-shaped artifact when the piece comes loose, as the tool will push the part away the last millimeter or so. This may cause the part to bounce back into the tool and cause all kinds of issues. And because you lose the position of the part when it comes off the stock, that makes it very hard to do a final pass on it to clean up tabs. This is a real issue if you can't clamp it down. I will have some parts like that later, I fear.

    [​IMG]
    I got a bit worried about marks so I put some plastic pieces to protect the surface of the piece.

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    This is what the code looks like. Some basic G-code for those interested, the S defines the tool speed, so in this case 13610 RPM. The M3 turns the spindle on in clockwise direction. M8 turns mist cooling on. Then G0 followed by XYZ with numbers tells the computer to go to that position in rapid speed (the maximum speed you have set it to). G1 works the same way but with the difference that it does not go to XYZ in rapid but in a specified feed rate (F). So for example, G1 Z11.5 F317 tells the motors to move the Z-axis to 11.5 mm above the 0-plane in with a speed of 317 mm/min.

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    The purple crosshair shows the machine's current position. You can also see some G-code, for example those dotted red lines are rapid moves in the XY-plane.

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    Sharp corners. Always nice to know that the machine is capable of that. You can sometimes get round corners, especially when the machine is trying to keep a constant velocity.

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    After a few minutes the cut is done. Here is the result. Now I have to release the clamps and turn the piece around and do the other side. There are some chamfered holes and a few more holes to be drilled.

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    Was deciding on the width for the chamfers so I did a few tests on an aluminium sheet that I was in the bin. Decided on 9 mm for the M4 screws and 7 mm for M3. A bit smaller than the ISO standard of 10 and 7.5 mm respectively. But I think it looks nicer with the smaller diameter so that is what I am going with.

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    10 mm Chamfer end mill. 90 degrees with a sharp tip. Used for plastics, aluminium, iron etc. Some kind of titanium coating, if I remember correctly.

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    Chamfers done!

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    Surface finish is very nice, except from that oxidized surface due to storage... I'll have to sand that down.

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    Really pleased with the first part! No mistakes as of yet!

    [​IMG]
    One completed bottom piece!
     
  13. Vault-Tec

    Vault-Tec Green Plastic Watering Can

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    Mmm, yummy plastic porn !
     
  14. Andreas | Brodholm

    Andreas | Brodholm Member

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    Plastic? :D
     
  15. eucalyptus

    eucalyptus I am 19 and Swedish!

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    What was it you were working with again, you say???


    I LOVE IT, I LOVE IT I LOVE IT!!!! :D :D :D
     
  16. Nexxo

    Nexxo * Prefab Sprout – The King of Rock 'n' Roll

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  17. Vault-Tec

    Vault-Tec Green Plastic Watering Can

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    Dat acrylic :thumb:
     
  18. Andreas | Brodholm

    Andreas | Brodholm Member

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    :lol:

    haha :D

    Now I get it, you mean the renders :thumb:
     
  19. Andreas | Brodholm

    Andreas | Brodholm Member

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    Update #04

    Time for a new update!

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
    Ready to "rock and roll" :D

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    G-code for the PSU holder. Forgot a finish pass here... Might have to redo this part but I am 90% certain that I can fix it with just some sand paper and some manual labor! Blunder by me in the programming. So easy to make a single mistake that can cost you the part and hours of work.

    [​IMG]
    First cut underway.

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    Fist cut done! This is the cutout for the PSU.

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    Time to do some manual cutting and remove the leftovers!

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    One waste piece removed.

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    Cleaned up the tabs with a finishing pass!

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    Next operation was holes for fastening the piece and also the PSU unit itself.

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    Third operation was chamfers on the profile.

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    And also on holes and the top part of the piece.

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    Fastening the piece before the final contour cut. A bit iffy setup. I would have wanted a clamp on the "other side" also but I took a bit of a gamble since I did not have space.

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    Cutting the contour.

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    About halfway through the cut.

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    All finished! Turned out okay. Forgot the finishing cut... The roughing cut took 100% of the finished (my mistake) size so it just did a hallow cut in "nothing" on the final pass... Well it took some material due to tool deflection but still there are some visible tool marks. 3 of the 4 corners will be adjacent to other pieces so I think I will just do some manual sanding on one edge and Ill be fine. Still buggs me, oh well...

    [​IMG]
    Fastened with stainless M4 screws. I am either going to polish these or paint them black in the final assembly. I have yet do decide. What I did want is stainless though. On Model 01 a few screws have gotten rusty in the insex slot due to humidity in the air and I would like to avoid that here.

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    Really pleased with the overall results so far.

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    Going from "2D" to "3D" really makes a difference.

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    MOAR PIECES, NEED TO MAKE MOAR NOW!!! Finally assembling something feels so great. After more than a year of planing and fixing, finally!

    [​IMG]
    On to the next pieces, I have run into some issues with the design or rather "I don't like" the a solution for a assembly that I would want to redesign. It is one of these design vs function questions. A few years back I would have been function all the way. But now I don't know. I want to find a solution that pleases both. It is how the plexi glass should be fastened. Either this VERY clean no fasteners on the whole side or make "tabs" that I can fasten the plexi glass on 4 places in the case. But they are visible. I have been thinking about this issue for a few days. Have to decide right now what I should go for. I believe I have found a good solution that satisfies both issues :)
     
  20. amagriva

    amagriva Member

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    It's all so neat and new and BEAUTYFUL seems like a surgery table...
    WOW
     

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